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Getting close to getting a third...


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Her argument is that there isn't a room left on the bed. I say that's a silly argument. There's one in rescue we both like that has strong herding potential which is what I really want to do, plus Izzy could use a friend that matches her drive. Toby is a really chill BC, he's happiest playing for 20 minutes give/take and then likes to sit and watch.

 

Thoughts on this? Space in the house isn't the issue and we can easily afford a third, probably 4 or 5 even.

 

Tim

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We had a foster in December - making it a 3rd dog. That dog, although very sweet - had a definite extra impact on our life. Although they said he was 2 yrs old he played like a puppy and tackled our dogs ( which Duchess really didn't like). Three weeks ago we adopted a 62 pnd german shorthaired pointer. She is also an high energy dog - but has had a different impact. She and Cody play- Cody wishes more. She is Duchess's new wing woman - allowing Duchess to relax a little. Grace has turned out to be the perfect 3rd dog for us - thank goodness.

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I wish a bigger bed was an option! Our house was built in 1875, so the downstairs living area is quite large, the previous owners put an addition on, the upstairs is typical for the 1800's where smaller rooms were necessary to keep in the heat in winter. I was amazed that we got a queen sized bed in our room.

 

I would love 4, heck I'd have 10 hahahaha, but no way that will happen.

 

DW is worried that we're going to go through what we went with with Toby (he had a LOT of issues that came out when he got here) the one I have my eyes one seems to have come from a great home-she was found as a stray-so I have that on my side.

 

She did agree to go see her next weekend, so my fingers are still crossed :rolleyes:

 

Tim

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A different perspective here - I'm not too fond of getting dogs for dogs.

 

My rule of thumb is not to add another dog until I have my current one(s) trained to a level that I am happy with. What training or classes have you done with your current two? Are you happy with the level that they are at? Are there improvements that you would still like to make? how are they with recalls? I have really, really enjoyed having a good amount of time to focus really working with one dog at a time. I think it really lets you build a stronger bond with your dog.

 

Do you have a trainer lined up? what do they think of this dog for stock work? Unless the rescue is very familiar with actually working the dogs on stock, I'd be getting a trainers opinion of the dog if you want to seriously pursue training for stockwork/trialing.

 

The dynamics of your relationship with your dogs changes a bit with the addition of a third. It's harder to take three dog anyplace (I still do, but it takes more planning/work), with three dogs you start to have a pack much more so that with two. Right now I rotate a lot. One reason is to give the older two a break from the crazy pup, one is so I can accomplish things without having three dogs under my feet, and another is because all the dogs really like their time with/attention from me.

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What Maralynn said. It is very wise to have your current dogs where you like them training and behavior-wise before bringing in a new one. And there is no guarantee that the new dog will turn into a good playmate. Sometimes it works out great; sometimes the best you get is peaceful co-existence; sometimes the dogs hate each other.

 

I also agree that taking 3 dogs places is much more of a challenge than loading two dogs up and heading out. I find 3 harder to juggle and of course there are fewer places/people that want to put up with three dogs. In my case, the Sheltie is incurably car-sick so she almost always stays home. As far as having three dogs at home, I find three about as easy as two. If Quinn and the Lhasa didn't dislike each other, requiring me to keep on top of them and their interactions, I doubt I'd notice much difference in day to day life.

 

And Maralynn is dead on in making sure someone who really knows how to evaluate and train stockdogs is the one saying the potential adoptee would be a good worker. If that is really important to you, at any rate.

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I now have 5 dogs. We only allow the 2 older dogs on the bed at night. The others sleep in their crates or downstairs which is gated off so they can't come upstairs. All dogs do not and should not have the same privileges. It all depends on the dogs and they have to earn certain rights.

 

We choose to only allow the older 2 on the bed because well they have been doing it for years. We doubt we will allow any of the others to sleep on the bed full time once these guys are gone.

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We have three - some nights (when I want a more guaranteed good night's sleep) they are crated. Some nights, when I just want them close, they sleep on their beds in the bedroom (and Celt sometimes gets up and sleeps by my feet later in the night, which I love).

 

It's got to be what works for you all, and you've gotten some excellent advice. I hope it does work out for you, for the dog's sake. Very best wishes!

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We have 4. One is crated at night, two sleep with us, and the last one wanders around and sleeps wherever he wants. If it's only the bed issue, you can work that out! :rolleyes: IMO, going to three dogs was not a big adjustment. Going to four dogs was a pretty big adjustment, though.

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A third dog can really change the dynamics. I would see if you could take her home for a day to see how things will sort out. When I first brought Riley over to my house, I had a foster dog and my own dog. Daisy is a bit dog reactive, but does tolerate other dogs. Cash (the foster) was very playful and fun, but would get overwhelmed easily. Daisy was very, very stressed out that Riley was "taking advantage" of Cash and Riley would get frustrated and the two of them would have vicious sounding barking matches. The dynamics with the 3 of them were not great at all. Daisy and Riley are fine together, just the two of them. He respects her and gives her space when she wants it. It just seemed that when Riley was getting away with murder with one dog, I think he thought he should just be allowed to do it with all dogs. He's since learned to be respectful with Daisy with a little bit of work.

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A different perspective here - I'm not too fond of getting dogs for dogs.

 

My rule of thumb is not to add another dog until I have my current one(s) trained to a level that I am happy with. What training or classes have you done with your current two? Are you happy with the level that they are at? Are there improvements that you would still like to make? how are they with recalls? I have really, really enjoyed having a good amount of time to focus really working with one dog at a time. I think it really lets you build a stronger bond with your dog.

 

Do you have a trainer lined up? what do they think of this dog for stock work? Unless the rescue is very familiar with actually working the dogs on stock, I'd be getting a trainers opinion of the dog if you want to seriously pursue training for stockwork/trialing.

 

The dynamics of your relationship with your dogs changes a bit with the addition of a third. It's harder to take three dog anyplace (I still do, but it takes more planning/work), with three dogs you start to have a pack much more so that with two. Right now I rotate a lot. One reason is to give the older two a break from the crazy pup, one is so I can accomplish things without having three dogs under my feet, and another is because all the dogs really like their time with/attention from me.

 

I am happy with how my two are currently. The game plan is to bring Izzy to meet this one we have in mind. Tobys anxiety in the car won't let us bring him. And yes, we have tried everything. If Izzy and said adoptee get along, it will be temporary to see how Toby and said dog get along.

 

I wouldn't just add a dog for the sake of adding a dog. Toby, while a full BC is more like a Golden Retriever in his personality, so Izzy is always looking for a playmate, and while I can give that too her most of the time, she would love to have on that's at her level of drive.

 

This dog also has drive to work stock, not sure how strong that is b/c I haven't met this dog yet, but I will be able to get the dog on sheep fairly quickly.

 

There is still a lot to be decided yet.

 

Just because I like this possible new addition doesn't mean Izzy/Toby will like her and that's most important.

 

Tim

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I second the motion!!! (You might need a bigger house that will fit a bigger bed.) :rolleyes:

 

Yes yes ... and then, of course, the bigger house needs a bigger piece of property, and so long as you're going to go with a larger piece of property, you might as well have enough property for sheep and stuff, and then you need more dogs. Oh and a bigger truck. You'll need that for the ranch anyway. While you're at the dealer, might as well get the RV to travel to trials and stuff, too. That way you don't have to go back for it later.

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:rolleyes::D:D

 

Yes yes ... and then, of course, the bigger house needs a bigger piece of property, and so long as you're going to go with a larger piece of property, you might as well have enough property for sheep and stuff, and then you need more dogs. Oh and a bigger truck. You'll need that for the ranch anyway. While you're at the dealer, might as well get the RV to travel to trials and stuff, too. That way you don't have to go back for it later.
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Yes yes ... and then, of course, the bigger house needs a bigger piece of property, and so long as you're going to go with a larger piece of property, you might as well have enough property for sheep and stuff, and then you need more dogs. Oh and a bigger truck. You'll need that for the ranch anyway. While you're at the dealer, might as well get the RV to travel to trials and stuff, too. That way you don't have to go back for it later.

Sounds like a plan to me. Where's the problem??? :rolleyes:

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I have been trying to talk my DH into geting another dog, he does not want another one right now but Jack needs friends of his own species. DH tried to throw the cats in there as a reason not to get another dog stating that we already have 3 pets...I told him no, it doesn't work that way. The cats were a 2 for 1 they were stray kittys that we ended up keeping and they are outside kittys that come and go as they please. I have tried the "puppy eyes", sending him pictures of dogs that I would love to bring in to our family none of these have worked short of me just showing up with another dog and see what kind of war that brings......So you are really lucky to have two or more, as many more are lucky enough to have a great pack. I will be here "wishing" to extend my pack and think of ways to accomplish it :rolleyes:

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I don't believe you should EVER "talk" a mate into another dog. Dogs get sick, which costs money. They can ruin stuff, which costs money. They need interaction, training, and love. If a mate is talked into such a venture, she/he may have agreed just to get you to shut up about it. And then there is the deep resentment, which will show up after a 2a.m. run to the e-vet because the dog ate something, or got hurt, etc.. There will be favoritism and that won't be good. If more than one person is living in the house, it really needs to be a joint venture. Yes, there are times when a mate has been talked into getting another dog, and then talked into person fell in love with the dog, and it all worked out. But there are lots more where it doesn't. Then there are bad feelings between the people, the dog suffers, and most likely returned or taken to rescue or the pound. Boot the person out and then you can do what you want, or accept that they are just not on the same page as you.

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It's a three ring circus at times, and I do remember those days when we had just Ladybug...gentle, quiet, biddable Ladybug....but for all the trouble, the only real drawback I can see it is that it is impossible to pet three dogs at the same time. :rolleyes:, they simply have to learn to wait their turn, and that's not a bad thing.

 

I've found this past year that the important thing is that everyone in the house is in the same page as far as training for basic manners and defining and enforcing house rules.

In my world, a dog belongs on a floor and in its own bed. Ladybug kinda blew that one right out of the water five years ago. When we brought her home, we gave her a bed in the kitchen ( a step up from our previous dogs who had slept in the mudroom). The next morning she was standing in front of the bedroom door like she'd been there all night, so we brought her bed into the bedroom....a slippery slope that was! A few days after we brought her home, I caught her and my son sitting on the LIVING ROOM "best" couch. He just shrugged and said, "I don't know, Mom. She just seems to expect it." And in truth, she did and so sweetly did she insinuate herself that she got away with it

 

DH extended those same privileges to the pups (under the treat them all alike rule) in spite of my protestations that not all dogs are equal. Now, I've got dogs all over the furniture....except in the living room because I put up a gate! This adds to my cleaning chores. They do sleep in crates... except for Ladybug, of course :D. Lately I've been giving Brodie house privileges when I'm gone for a few hours. He and Ladybug get on well, he's not destructive and it does him good to be out of his crate more often. I would never leave the three of them out together or Robin and Brodie together when I was gone for more than five minutes...or come to think if it, even Robin by himself because he'd eat the couch! Take a great deal of time to learn how the three react to each other before you leave any combination of the three together unsupervised.

 

Making time to work with them is important as well. It takes a great deal of effort to make sure everyone the same amount of training time, fun time, and petting and grooming. At least twice a day, I line all three of them up and take them through a few paces to be sure that they understand who is running the railroad around here. I'm sure that either one of the boys would be much further along if they were an "only" dog but we manage to trudge along at a slower pace, perhaps but we're getting there.

 

Give a good deal of thought about how and where you will tuck them away when guests come, etc. One dog is very easy to stash, two is doable, but three becomes a bit of a challenge and three dogs are a lot wandering around loose with a houseful of company.

 

Liz

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I don't believe you should EVER "talk" a mate into another dog. Dogs get sick, which costs money. They can ruin stuff, which costs money. They need interaction, training, and love. If a mate is talked into such a venture, she/he may have agreed just to get you to shut up about it. And then there is the deep resentment, which will show up after a 2a.m. run to the e-vet because the dog ate something, or got hurt, etc.. There will be favoritism and that won't be good. If more than one person is living in the house, it really needs to be a joint venture. Yes, there are times when a mate has been talked into getting another dog, and then talked into person fell in love with the dog, and it all worked out. But there are lots more where it doesn't. Then there are bad feelings between the people, the dog suffers, and most likely returned or taken to rescue or the pound. Boot the person out and then you can do what you want, or accept that they are just not on the same page as you.

 

Casey (husband) needed a bit of convincing for Drama & Fluke and he honestly couldn't love those dogs any more than he does. He worries more about them than I do at times. I think it really depends on the type of person you are with as well as the relationship you have with them.

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Haven't read all the responses, but I will say that 3 dogs is about 5 times more work than 2. I doubt if we'll ever do it again, but who knows.

 

In our situation, 3 dogs + 2 cats, not all of whom got along with each other all the time, meant that when I went out of town, the dogs had to be kenneled, 2 at one place and the oldest at another place. The last 14 months of my dad's life, I made 10 out of town trips, and we spent around 4000 bucks in kenneling. And, when I would leave town, I'd have to put together food for 3 dogs, along with detailed instructions for meds, etc. AND, put together detailed instructions for cat care to leave with my hubby.

 

I thought at the time we brought Buzz home that it wouldn't be that big a deal, adding one more great dog to our family. It is. Dogs get sick, people get sick, the amount of time, energy, and dollars needed to keep everything going goes up as pets age. Three dogs can get along great, or the switch from 2 to 3 can cause a big upset in the balance, which it did in our situation. And then we got to learn what that's all about, and how to live as peacefully as possible with one dog who hates another.

 

There aren't any guarantees, either way, but don't think it's just another bowl of kibbble. It's way more than that.

 

Ruth

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Making time to work with them is important as well. It takes a great deal of effort to make sure everyone the same amount of training time, fun time, and petting and grooming. At least twice a day, I line all three of them up and take them through a few paces to be sure that they understand who is running the railroad around here. I'm sure that either one of the boys would be much further along if they were an "only" dog but we manage to trudge along at a slower pace, perhaps but we're getting there.

 

Give a good deal of thought about how and where you will tuck them away when guests come, etc. One dog is very easy to stash, two is doable, but three becomes a bit of a challenge and three dogs are a lot wandering around loose with a houseful of company.

 

Liz

 

Love it! I know Katie would love a third, she's not worried about training, or the cost, etc. She's worried about where they'll sleep, and we've been together long enough for me to know she wants a third but she'll need to meet the new prospect first.

 

Like I mentioned before Toby is very chill and Izzy is looking for someone else to play with most of the time. She is extremely active, not destructive thankfully, just full of get-up-and-go.

 

When people come over, Izzy is in the middle of it wanting pets from EVERYONE. I honestly believe when people come over she think we're having a party for her. Toby greets everyone then heads upstairs to his crate where he'll chill for about an hour then he'll come back an rejon the party.

 

The new one we're thinking of matches Izzy in social skills, wants to be with everyone and show how cute she is, which is what we're after.

 

I wish Toby would be more like that, but his past abuse still gets in the way, though he has made TREMEDOUS strides since joining our house.

 

Tim

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