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ok this question is pretty far off topic but its still a dog question. growing up i had a friend who had two huge rots that were probably the most relaxed, friendliest dogs i have ever met. I mean these things were 150 lb teddy bears. Because of this experience i have kinda always like rottweilers but it seems that they get a pretty bad reputation with most people thinking they are mean or aggressive. I was wondering what some of your guys opinion on this breed where as someday i would like to get one when we have more room. if i was to get one i would most likely look for a younger pup and raise it with lots of affection and lots and lots of training while still young. Anybody of any thoughts on the breed or training tips??

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My sister had 2. both died of old age. She had her grandaughter living with her (since baby) and those dogs were great. I'm not to fond of the size and the slobber but they were wonderful dogs for my sister. Be careful, they are known to have really bad hips, both my sisters dogs did.

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Personality wise, they can be great dogs. I have a pitty now, and had an Akita years ago, both dogs just being big teddy bears. The issue is that they have the potential, given a poor owner who encourages poor behaviour.

 

On a health view, my vet once told me rotties would put his kids through school...my daughter's rottie had bad hips and elbows....

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All of the Rottweilers that I know are very nice dogs. They seem to be extremely compliant and train very nicely.

 

Rottweiler owners that I know, though, are very sensitive to the negative reputation. They say that they have to work harder to make sure that their dogs are on their best behavior at all times in public since people are expecting bad things from the dogs. And there is pressure that comes with that. There is more responsibility on the owner to prove that the Rottweiler is a safe dog.

 

So, that's something to consider.

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Assumming that the owner is "responsible" and capable of handling a large, powerful dog, I think that the primary problem with so-called dangerous breeds is public perception, which creates very real insurance and housing issues. A lot of people with pitbulls are able to fly under the radar by calling their dogs boxer-mixes, lab-mixes or whatever. However, it will be pretty hard to fly under the radar (if you need/want to do so) with a Rottie.

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Rottweiler owners that I know, though, are very sensitive to the negative reputation. They say that they have to work harder to make sure that their dogs are on their best behavior at all times in public since people are expecting bad things from the dogs. And there is pressure that comes with that. There is more responsibility on the owner to prove that the Rottweiler is a safe dog.

 

So, that's something to consider.

 

Kristine, that's a very good point. Owning a pitbull for me is a social challenge, in that I have to make sure she puts out a very positive vibe for her breed. If I'm walking the BCs, anyone at all will come up and try to pet them. The pitty gets a more cautious approach. Nyx is, in fact, my most reliable and trustworthy dog with other dogs and people. But the stigma is something to be aware of when out in public.

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All good points here. I had GSD's and worked very hard to make sure they were wonderful examples of their breed. As pointed out by Blackdawgs, there can be an insurance issue with the so-called dangerous breeds. When I moved from OH to MD, we had one insurance company flat out refuse us because we had 2 GSD's at the time. Another insurance company said we need to meet your dogs first. He did, they were good and kept the insurance guy busy throwing balls to them, we got coverage through that company.

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Rotties are also extremely prone to cancers, in addition to the bad joints problem. Bone cancer seems to be the #1 cancer that afflicts them.

 

I don't much care for them as a breed, but I don't tend to favour blocky dogs, or large black and tan dogs as a general rule. But does it matter what anyone else thinks, if you are fond of the breed?

 

As an aside, I had a houseguest this past weekend who is not a "dog person" - he likes them well enough, but would never have one and isn't so interested in spending time with them or talking about them. He mentioned that for a long time he was terrified of dobermans, because growing up every tv show or movie that had bad guys with mean dogs in it had a doberman, and it must have just sunk into his psyche that dobermans were scary, awful dogs. It wasn't until he saw one with natural ears rolling around at a park one time that it occurred to him that maybe they weren't that scary after all. I had kind of always wondered how media hype could suck people in about breeds like pit bulls or what have you, but as a "dog person" I guess I just didn't get it.

 

As long as there are people who use Dobes and Rotties and such as junkyard dogs etc., there will always be people who are freaked out by them. The folks who share my property have a pitbull and a little mop of a lhasa mix, and based on my few interactions with them, I'd much rather meet the pitty in a dark alley than the mop dog ;-)

 

RDM

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Rotties do get cancer, more than the average dog. Many die quite young of osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, etc.

 

The ones I know are either super sweet or holy terrors that you couldn't pay me to own. To be honest, their temperament seems to be even more genetic that many other breeds. Even a good upbringing can't overcome bad genes in an aggressive Rottie.

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My DH had two Rotts. Both were very nice dogs. The older (and smaller, he was an American Rott as opposed to the German Rott) was most definately a one-person dog. I was okay, especially if there were treats to be had, but I was not his person, make no mistake. I'm told that this is a common trait to the breed (although I think all dogs have their person). This one did have hip problems and ended up having cancer. The other Rott was considerably bigger and considerably less intelligent. He preferred certain people, but was just happy to be around as many people as he could. He and I had a battle of wills, but in the end, he learned "leave it" and "sit" and "get off the couch". Also, he was smart enough to know who to listen to. He did not listen to DH, but I could be in another room, shout out a command, and he would do it. Keep in mind that Rotts like to "talk". Anyone I know who has a Rott tells me the same thing. Not so much as barking, but the entire vocal range that canines are able to use is utilized.

 

And their reputation? Sure, they get a bad rap, but they are intelligent and loyal and protective. To be honest, I would trust both of the Rotts I lived with NOT to bite before I would trust my Border Collie, who can be a little flighty.

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I have known a few, some were wonderful dogs and a few were a little scary, and most had health issues. If this were a breed I was looking at, I would carefully evaluate the parents for temperament and health for a couple of generations. Or, I would get a rescue dog as an adult with the joints evaluated and a careful assessment of temperament.

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I used to know a trainer who trained for the various police agencies in this area. He trained police dogs for patrol mostly. He had two very nice Rottweiler bitches and we talked about them once. He told me that he used to have German Shepherd Dogs by preference, and that when his Rotties passed he would go back to that breed. When I asked him why he said that the GSDs learned faster and were much less stubborn.

 

As near as I can tell there's very little to choose between the two breeds as per health problems. But if I were to get a Rottie I would try for a small female, as I generally prefer female dogs - they seem less territorial and are (in my experience, more a about watching out for their owner than their home turf.) Also I would hope that a smaller dog would be less prone to bone and joint problems.

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IMO the important thing is the breeding. I've known several with mixed experiences. As could be expected, rotties from good breeders were great dogs who made good family pets; rotties sold on the side of the road and through pet stores had bad temperaments, all kinds of health issues, and in fact one was barred from group obedience class for biting the trainer and acting aggressive towards other dogs. Although I have no desire to have one, I do like the well-bred ones. A friend had one live to be 13 with minimal health issues other than old age.

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I just spend the weekend at some obedience/rally trials. There were a total of 4 Rottweilers in the arena. One, in particular, named Dorlee, laughingly had her name changed to "ILEAN"...because she would lean on you to get a pat on the head, then roll over so you would do her belly! All these dogs had superlative manners, were obviously well trained and had good owners. I was pleased to see them since many people seem to have an irrational fear to large dogs..and Rottweilers, Dobermans and German Shepherds in particular. I think these dogs were all from the same breeder, though I could be mistaken.

 

In fact, at this particular trial, there were more large dogs (Rottweilers, GSD's, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers) than the typical Shelties and Papillons.

 

I can't make a judgement one way or another..but I do know these dogs were the most pleasant, friendly dogs you could ask for.

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Hi there ~

 

I like Rotties just fine. I've known many who are really wonderful dogs, just big, happy lugs. But as has been noted, they seem prone to a lot of health issues, and I don't think they'd be a good match for people who aren't into being the Alpha of their pack. As youngsters, the Rotties I've known are sometimes very exuberant and impulsive, which is a handful when wrapped in an 80 pound pack of muscle. Plus in my admittedly-limited observation, they can be stubborn.

 

But, I'd say if you're comfortable being a take-charge dog owner (and it sounds like you are,) go for it. Just research the bloodlines carefully for health issues. I think well-bred Rotties who are properly trained and socialized (some other dog breeds are utterly horrified by a Rottie's gleeful bounce) can be great dogs. :rolleyes:

Cheers ~

 

Gloria

P.S.

Edited to add, I also agree that temperament DOES seem to depend on the breeding as much as training. So I'd make good temperaments a "must" in researching a future pup for you.

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Rotties can be great with proper handling and good breeding. But because of their size, they can also be very destructive and potentially dangerous if allowed/encouraged.

 

We got a Rott/G. Shep. mix when I was 13. She was a bit wild when we got her because her well meaning previous owners weren't familiar with raising a large active dog. The wife had to have many stitches after a walk one day as the dog (then 9 months old) had wrapped the leash around the owners legs, pushed her over (many Rotts herd by pushing), and drug her down the street after a squirrel. She had also chewed the siding off their house and destroyed their hot tub and somehow removed a significant amount of hair from the cat (while playing...didn't hurt the cat though, just left it bald in some areas). They finally decided she wasn't the right dog for them and needed a new home. By the time we got her, the teething was done with and she really just needed some training (or un-training). Getting her to stop pushing us in the direction she wanted to go on walks was the hardest habit to put a stop to, but once we got past that, she was a great dog. Most of her issues were just a lack of manners and were quickly resolved with a little training. She became a well mannered, obedient dog that loved to play with all the kids in the neighborhood.

 

My aunt had/has Rottweilers. Her first Rottie was a well bred dog that they got as a puppy about 18 years ago. He was well trained and an all around well mannered playful dog that could be trusted with small children and strangers. Then she got a female...a bit more hyperactive, but still a good dog. She wasn't quite as easy to train as the first boy, but with some work, she came around. Then my aunt and her husband-at-the-time started breeding Rotts...they didn't really have a clue and the genes pretty much went downhill pretty quickly. I'm not sure if they weren't spending as much time on training or what, but over a few years time their house which once had three well behaved dogs turned to one with 8-10 crazy rotts...the kind that lead to the breed getting a bad rep. One dog (from their breeding) was perfectly fine with my petting him one second, then had me pinned me against the wall the next second. Had my cousin not quickly stepped in, I don't doubt that I would have gotten bit. Apparently, that particular dog was prone to 'quick mood changes' and was 'a little crazy'. My aunt has been severely bitten twice by her dogs (once when breaking up a fight...the second time she's 'unclear' as to why the dog bit her) and last I heard she also has one dog that has to be locked in a crate at night or he attacks the other dogs. I don't know if this is poor breeding or lack of socialization and training, probably both, but her's are not dogs I'd want at my house or in public.

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My son and his family have rottie brothers. They were not planning to get dogs, but there was an adoption thingie at a pet store when they went to the grocery. They wanted one, but agreed to the pair.

 

I visited when the dogs were about a year old. Their crates served as coffee tables. By then, son et al had acquired two kittens. A kitten would go into a crate, with a dog inside, and steal toys. Or sit on top of a crate and poke a dog. Both dogs accepted it with amazing grace.

 

My cousin (the dog trainer) said that Rotties were perfect dogs. They are calm and adaptable. And, if you need to train them for protection (he trained dogs for the Groton neuclear submarine base), they understand serious commands but can still be pets.

 

I don't care what the breed is, unless the dog has real physical/psychiatric problems, I think that it is way more the training than anything else that matters.

 

I've known wonderful chows & akitas and nasty labs.

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My son and his family have rottie brothers. They were not planning to get dogs, but there was an adoption thingie at a pet store when they went to the grocery. They wanted one, but agreed to the pair.

 

I visited when the dogs were about a year old. Their crates served as coffee tables. By then, son et al had acquired two kittens. A kitten would go into a crate, with a dog inside, and steal toys. Or sit on top of a crate and poke a dog. Both dogs accepted it with amazing grace.

 

My cousin (the dog trainer) said that Rotties were perfect dogs. They are calm and adaptable. And, if you need to train them for protection (he trained dogs for the Groton neuclear submarine base), they understand serious commands but can still be pets.

 

I don't care what the breed is, unless the dog has real physical/psychiatric problems, I think that it is way more the training than anything else that matters.

 

I've known wonderful chows & akitas and nasty labs.

 

Have you ever trained a Basenji? :rolleyes:

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I've only barely trained our bc/(reportedly)lab Fergie - and even less with our 1967-1982 lab/shepherd Vamp. But one of Fegr's good friends some years ago was a Basenji named Tasi, because she was taciturn.

 

What's the point?

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I've only barely trained our bc/(reportedly)lab Fergie - and even less with our 1967-1982 lab/shepherd Vamp. But one of Fegr's good friends some years ago was a Basenji named Tasi, because she was taciturn.

 

What's the point?

 

What's the point of the post? Or what's the point of training a Basenji?

 

If the former, it's meant to be funny.

 

If the latter, I can only quote the late Vicki Hearn. "The way to train a Basenji is to tie the dog under a shady tree and then go find a nice brick wall to bashyour head against."

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Day before yesterday 3 rotties attacked a five year old boy - he is in critical condition. They pulled him out of his bed and just ripped him to pieces.

 

The man who owned them has had other dogs euthanized by animal control in the past - all for being agressive. Well, I think the police actually shot two of his other dogs.

 

What bothers me about this breed is that a lot of the dogs may be just fine but the potential for extreme violence is still there. If they ever do decide to attack they have the potential to kill children and adults.

 

I would just never, ever take that risk.

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well it sounds like the owner is mostly the problem in that situation. if he has had several dogs put down or shot because of aggression then my feeling would be he is probably doing something to encourage unstable behavior. The ability for aggressiveness is there in any animal, domesticated or not.

 

On another note i hadn't really thought about the health issues much but now that i do both of the ones i knew could hardly walk towards the end but they were both pretty old and kinda overwieght. Is their much one can do as far as diet and exercise to help with the joint problems?

 

The social stigma would be a challenge to overcome but it would be fun to take uneducated people that my have some apprehension about such dogs and show them that they are just as friendly as any other dog.

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