Jump to content
BC Boards

Would You Sell a Dog at Auction?


Recommended Posts

A recent thread reports that a Border Collie named Bob has been sold at auction for 9,240 British Pounds. I don't know how common it is for dogs to be sold at auction, but it did give me pause. The article linked in the thread said the dog was "destined for life in the US."

 

Do bidders in such an auction have to qualify in some way, or can anyone with pots of money show up and make the winning bid?

 

If I had bred and trained a dog, or even bought and trained a dog like this one was, I think I'd like to know a bit about the person to whom I would hand the leash.

 

What do you all think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I know of the dog auctions in Ohio which many are trying (or maybe they have already stopped?) to ban. They're not $9,000 dogs though but mostly puppy mill wash outs. A former co worker of mine used to buy handful of dogs from there on each trip so she could breed them and sell doodle poo whatever mixes to idiots up here. There is also a livestock auction near me where people (mainly the Amish but not always) can bring puppies and auction them off. Luckily it doesn't happen too much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are different type of auctions.

From fish to exotics.

Most common of course livestock auctions.

There are well run auctions that do not attract too many people with ill will. Others attract only shady people.

Some auctions I would sell at. But not likely.

Now, as far as dogs is concerned...I could not see myself doing it. But, they have a big stock dog sale at Red Bluff (? does it still exist) and an auction that draws that kind of money is probably a well established event.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure. I have, and probably will again. As someone noted, there are different types of auctions. I am familiar with the Red Bluff sale and the sale at National Western Stock Show in Denver. Both are sales for dogs working cattle (Red Bluff specifies young dogs--not sure if there is an age restriction for Denver). At both sales, you show the dog working, and those who are bidding are ranchers looking for a dog to take home to go to work right away on their cattle operations. The Red Bluff sale is in conjunction with their Bull sale; the bull sale has been going over 80 years, and the dog sale 35, I think. NWSS has been going for 5 years, I believe.

 

I also see that Superior just had their first stockdog sale yesterday, online. I'm not sure how this one works, but Superior Livestock auctions are quite well known. I think in these cases, since the target audience is so specific, that most who consider selling or buying see an auction as a great way to place a dog into a good working home.

 

At Red Bluff, you work the dog over three days. Before and after working the dogs, lots of people will talk to the handlers about the dogs--asking about such things as if the dog gets along with children, will also work sheep or goats, rides in the pickup or on the back of the quad, and so on. When I have been there and talked with potential buyers, I am always amazed at their stories--almost everyone who is seriously looking for a dog will speak of their old dog who has been the "greatest dog ever," but who is now getting old, and they are looking to find their new "greatest dog ever."

 

Generally, the dogs (if they are good), sell for pretty good money. If a rancher pays $5,000 or $6,000 for a dog, they see the value of the dog as a work partner, and are not going to be careless with the dog's welfare.

 

If I can raise a dog and train it up to be a useful working partner for a rancher, and it goes to a guy who has 2,500 pairs (and about 1,000 goats, too), and the ranching partner/son in law says, "oh, mom will really spoil this one," as I hand over the leash, it seems like a win-win to me,

A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with stockdogranch.

 

Historically working dogs have been viewed and valued in the same way as the livestock they help with. It makes sense for the people who buy and sell them to do so in a fashion with which they are both comfortable and accustomed. Auctions have always been important in the agricultural community. I do not wish to control every aspect of the lives of the stock I breed, why would I feel any different about a dog?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have no problem with selling dogs at auction, it's a great way for someone to have an opportunity to secure a dog that they otherwise would not even know was available for sale or would have no chance to buy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Anna. I only know about horse auctions where very fine horses often go to the "canners." I find it sad to see a well-bred, mannerly pony or horse end up cat food because some little girl wants a more talented mount for gymkhana.

 

I wondered if it would be likely that a talented young stock dog could wind up in some sport/color breeders kennel, or in a puppy mill, churning out pups by the hundreds.

 

Nice to know that there are places where a dog can be auctioned with relative safety.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMO it would be extremely unlikely that one of the cattle bred dogs sold at Red Bluff/ Denver/Superior etc type auctions would end up in a sport/ color breeding kennel, even though there is sometimes a preference in the cattle world for red dogs.

 

After all, sport/ color breeders want to tout " working lines" not necessarily working "dogs". Normally these dogs go to working ranchers who know the value and time saving ability of well bred and well trained dogs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so long as those selling at the auctions are breeding for work and not promoting and featuring all the stuff that the sport/color breeders want then I don't see were it will ever be a problem, but if some of the breeders realize that the sport/color breeders will pay a lot more and begin to sell dogs through the auctions focusing on different selling points then yeah, but will those dog be truly talented working dogs? Doubt it.

 

Here is the video from the high selling dog, was a red dog, he brought right around $7000.00, I doubt that anyone worries about him going to a sport/color breeder.

 

http://www.superiorlivestock.com/onlineVideoCatalog/?contractId=922&lot=s3#lot

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't worry much about the dog going to a sport/color breeder, but worry much more about whether it ended up in a good home or not. (I know, I know, my idea of a good home and some working people's idea of a good home are two entirely different things...)

 

I'd never find myself in the position, but my answer would be no, anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Raising and training working dogs is a business for a lot of people, whether full time or as a sideline.

Auctions are often the sale method of choice for farming people for selling all sorts of things as they want to get the best prices.

Why would that not also apply to working dogs? A working dog is worth what it is worth to the buyer and the price that buyer is willing to pay could be way over what the seller has in mind.

 

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A working dog is worth what it is worth to the buyer and the price that buyer is willing to pay could be way over what the seller has in mind.

 

Good point.

 

I know, I know, my idea of a good home and some working people's idea of a good home are two entirely different things...

 

I think people often have a misconception of how "working people" treat their dogs. Many working people have their dogs with them most of the time, riding in the truck, or on the quad, or whatever. At the end of the day, maybe they're in a kennel, or maybe they're in the house. But, let's try looking at it from the *dog's* point of view. What is the dog's idea of a "good home"? I think sometimes we anthropomorphize too much, and look at things from *our* point of view.

 

I would much rather see a dog work all day and hang around with its person in the truck or on the quad, and then sleep in a kennel at night than to see one dressed in cutesy clothing, carried around in a purse or wheeled around in a stroller, talked to like an infant, and then sleep in the bed. Sure, that's the extreme, but you get the idea...

A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. It seems that people, especially from the "pet paradigm" tend to be overcritical of how others manage their dogs. I think it's ironic that the all too often under-exercised, overfed, over-washed and misunderstood pet dog is often seen as better off than the working dog that sleeps in a kennel. Dogs are adaptable, but there's a limit. I think if you asked the dog, they'd choose the challenging work, partnership with a like-minded human, and sleeping in peace in a kennel over being coddled on a sofa and being taught all sorts of cute but rather pointless behaviors to "engage its mind." (Mine included.)

 

Not to say my dog doesn't have a good life. She's fit and happy. But if she knew "how the other half lived..." ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good point.

 

 

I think people often have a misconception of how "working people" treat their dogs. Many working people have their dogs with them most of the time, riding in the truck, or on the quad, or whatever. At the end of the day, maybe they're in a kennel, or maybe they're in the house. But, let's try looking at it from the *dog's* point of view. What is the dog's idea of a "good home"? I think sometimes we anthropomorphize too much, and look at things from *our* point of view.

 

I would much rather see a dog work all day and hang around with its person in the truck or on the quad, and then sleep in a kennel at night than to see one dressed in cutesy clothing, carried around in a purse or wheeled around in a stroller, talked to like an infant, and then sleep in the bed. Sure, that's the extreme, but you get the idea...

A

 

Notice I said SOME working people's idea of a good home. I'm not talking at all of a situation like you describe, nor do I mean sleeping in a kennel. (which mine have all done)

 

Again, SOME working homes...I realize there are plenty of working homes I'd agree that the dogs are treated great, and I'm not lumping them all together. Just as I'm sure you're not lumping all pet owners into the "dress in cutesy clothing and ride around in stroller" group.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope, choose a side, Paula. You're dog is either in a stroller or riding a quad. :P

 

And I agree that there are some working (and trialling) homes into which I would wish no dog. I think those were the ones to which you were referring, not the "work all day on the ranch and then come into the house and watch TV in the evening" homes.

 

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to make sure Rex's new hat fits him. He's running in Open in a trial next weekend and he has to look good.

 

Again, SOME working homes...I realize there are plenty of working homes I'd agree that the dogs are treated great, and I'm not lumping them all together. Just as I'm sure you're not lumping all pet owners into the "dress in cutesy clothing and ride around in stroller" group.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dear Fellow Sheepdoggers,

 

I am not criticizing my friends who sell dogs at auction and if I had the money maybe I'd buy one.

 

I don't view this as a moral issue but it is a personal one.

 

I'm sentimental and there are open trial winners, commercial stockmen and pet owners I wouldn't sell a dog to. I won't offer a dog at auction because I will decide who gets my dog.

 

Donald McCaig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...