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novice trial course


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Catfish,

Because the novice classes aren't sanctioned, there are no set rules for course layout, etc. What sort of course is offered may well depend on what region of the country you're in. That said, a novice-novice course usually consists of a short outrun, fetch to the handler, a wear (an assisted drive is allowed, but not required, in some regions), and a pen. Some N/N courses are even shorter, where you'd fetch straight back to the pen and pen the sheep, with no wear. It might be best to ask the trial host of the trial you're thinking to enter and get details on the novice course. Depending on the type of trial (all novice, fun day type trial, full open trial) different things may be allowed, so you may or may not be allowed to leave the post and still complete your run (as leaving the post normally means you've retired your run). At many novice trials, the trial manager will allow handlers to leave the post and fix problems and complete the course if things aren't going badly, but you will be considered retired. Others, especially at a large trial that's pressed to get through all the runs in the hours available, may simply say if you need to leave the post, you're retired and you should gather your dog and leave the field. That's why it's always good to ask the host/trial manager before entering (if at all possible). Hope that helps.

 

J.

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Catfish,

Because the novice classes aren't sanctioned, there are no set rules for course layout, etc. What sort of course is offered may well depend on what region of the country you're in. That said, a novice-novice course usually consists of a short outrun, fetch to the handler, a wear (an assisted drive is allowed, but not required, in some regions), and a pen. Some N/N courses are even shorter, where you'd fetch straight back to the pen and pen the sheep, with no wear. It might be best to ask the trial host of the trial you're thinking to enter and get details on the novice course. Depending on the type of trial (all novice, fun day type trial, full open trial) different things may be allowed, so you may or may not be allowed to leave the post and still complete your run (as leaving the post normally means you've retired your run). At many novice trials, the trial manager will allow handlers to leave the post and fix problems and complete the course if things aren't going badly, but you will be considered retired. Others, especially at a large trial that's pressed to get through all the runs in the hours available, may simply say if you need to leave the post, you're retired and you should gather your dog and leave the field. That's why it's always good to ask the host/trial manager before entering (if at all possible). Hope that helps.

 

J.

Thank you for the input. I'm just really, really, nervous!

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Well, do what you can to relax, because the more nervous you are the more your dog will be able to tell, and that could make for a worse run that you're both capable of. Have you seen this thread: Stage Fright

 

and this one? Article by Don McCaig

 

Also this one:Before your run

 

If you've already read them I apologize for the repeats, but for anyone else who might be wondering about a first trial, they're good resources.

 

J.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Looks like novice classes are now sanctioned ... ??? Am I reading this right?

 

USBCHA Board Minutes

 

July 12, 2007

 

After a lengthy discussion of sanctioning Novice classes Beverly Lambert motioned the USBCHA begin a program of sanctioning novice trials. The HA will charge a $1 per dog sanctioning fee for novice trials. This will earn the trial "Novice Sanctioning". Such trials will fall under all of the applicable rules and regulations of the HA. All handlers competing in such events and all groups putting on such events must abide by those rules.

 

This sanctioning is Novice Sanctioning only and does not qualify a handler for regular membership in the HA. This sanctioning is purely voluntary and is an opportunity for trial hosts to take advantage of HA insurance coverage and the protection of running under HA rules, seconded by Mike Neary. Motion passed.

 

Gene Sheninger – yes Lena Bailey – yes Sandra Milberg - yes

 

Emil Luedecke – no Dean Holcomb – no Michele Howard – yes

 

Dale Huhrt – no Beverly Lambert – yes Laura Hicks - yes

 

Wilda Bahr – yes Mike Neary – yes Barb Ross – yes

 

Bruce Smart – yes Kate Broadbent - yes

 

 

 

Francis Raley

 

Jodi

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Looks like novice classes are now sanctioned ... ??? Am I reading this right?

 

USBCHA Board Minutes

Jodi

 

Yes and no.

 

The USBCHA Board of Directors has decided to allow trial hosts, on a voluntary basis and at their discretion, to apply for sanctioning for novice classes in order that they might avail themselves of the USBCHA liability insurance. Sanctioning fee will be $1/run.

 

One will still need to compete in either Nursery or Open to qualify for a voting membership.

 

There will be no USBCHA novice awards.

 

This was intended to indemnify trial hosts who do not have the advantage of local club liability insurance coverage.

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More to the point re this thread, the HA will still not be setting any format or standards for these classes, so their format and rules will remain up to the local association and/or the trial host.

 

Just IMHO, it's a shame the board used the term "sanctioning", which seems to imply that USBCHA will specify the manner of the junior classes as they do the open and nursery. Bet we'll see a lot more claims of USBCHA Titles or whatever from ack folks running in N/N.

 

But, I guess if that's our biggest problem, we're doing OK. And, as one who spent many years in the junior classes, I'm glad that the HA is offering support to folks willing to put on novice trials. I learned a lot in those trials, though you rarely see the positive results in my open runs of late.

 

Colin

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  • 3 weeks later...

With the exception of the Finals, I wasn't aware of any official HA formats/standards or "specified manner" for sanctioned Open or Nursery classes either, leaving the course format and rules up to the local association/trial host. Or, am I off base?

 

... the HA will still not be setting any format or standards for these classes, so their format and rules will remain up to the local association and/or the trial host.

 

... it's a shame the board used the term "sanctioning", which seems to imply that USBCHA will specify the manner of the junior classes as they do the open and nursery....
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Well, Section 22 of the HA rules does contain a course/point description, which says "in judging the HA Sanctioned trials judges shall apply the following general rules," and which specifies and describes the usual trial elements (phases of work). Also, as regards Nursery, Section 31 says that "The nursery dogs must run a full National style course, without the shedding work, in order to be a qualifying class." Certainly trial hosts have a lot of discretion in how they set up their trials, and I have never heard of a trial being refused sanction or de-sanctioned because it departed too much from the traditional format, though I suppose it could happen. But generally it's tradition and "just understood." I don't think there's that kind of consistent tradition in the novice classes, which vary quite a bit in different regions of the country.

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Interesting... I recall a motion some time back about not sanctioning arena time trials for sheep/cattle, which was subsequently withdrawn allowing continued sanctioning. Although I don't recall the specific why (for the original motion or the subsequent withdrawal) it does seem that most arena/timed trials certainly don't fit neatly into Section 22 or 31.

 

Anyway, I've departed down a rabbit trail... you're right of course, the real point is novice classes do vary quite a bit... and it is best to call ahead to someone who has knowledge of the specific course.

 

Well, Section 22 of the HA rules does contain a course/point description, which says "in judging the HA Sanctioned trials judges shall apply the following general rules," and which specifies and describes the usual trial elements (phases of work). Also, as regards Nursery, Section 31 says that "The nursery dogs must run a full National style course, without the shedding work, in order to be a qualifying class." Certainly trial hosts have a lot of discretion in how they set up their trials, and I have never heard of a trial being refused sanction or de-sanctioned because it departed too much from the traditional format, though I suppose it could happen. But generally it's tradition and "just understood." I don't think there's that kind of consistent tradition in the novice classes, which vary quite a bit in different regions of the country.
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