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Tommy Coyote
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One other thing to be careful of. I hadn't ever seen avacado on the list of foods to watch.

 

It's not the avacado - it's the pit. Can cause blockage. Zeke will eat anything so I now make sure those pits are safely out of his reach when I fix avacado.

 

And I just added corn cobs to the list.

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According to the PhD vet at the pet poison control, dogs are not poisoned by avocado. The persin in avocado skin, leaves, and bark is poisonous to birds and some large animals(I've heard), but not dogs. The pit is still definitely a blockage danger.

 

We had a Bull Terrier come in that had eaten quite a number of things, including a training collar, some screws, a ball point pen, and the owners credit cards(mostly whole). We actually had to do surgery on that dog on 3 different occassions to remove foreign objects. There was a training collar involved every time.

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According to the PhD vet at the pet poison control, dogs are not poisoned by avocado. The persin in avocado skin, leaves, and bark is poisonous to birds and some large animals(I've heard), but not dogs. The pit is still definitely a blockage danger.

 

I am not qualified to argue, but the http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/foods-are-hazardous-dogs appears to think that some avocados (Specifically Guatemalan ones -- Hass are bred from Guatemalan avocados, I believe) are poisonous. I simply keep avocados skins and pits out of reach.

 

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I've heard this about avos for some years. I'm not sure what to think. I live on a ranch that has commercial avocado groves. I see lots of evidence that the ones that fall get eaten by the 'yotes for sure, and I know my LGDs eat their share, as well. When I take the border collies into pastures for a run, we often find pits, and the dogs crunch them up and eat them. We have several diferent varieties--Haas and Fuerete that I know of, not sure if there are others.

 

A

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I am not qualified to argue, but the http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/foods-are-hazardous-dogs appears to think that some avocados (Specifically Guatemalan ones -- Hass are bred from Guatemalan avocados, I believe) are poisonous. I simply keep avocados skins and pits out of reach.

 

 

From the website linked above:

While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care. (emphasis added)

 

While it's not dismissing any potential for toxicity, I wouldn't interpret this as a declaration that avocados are "poisonous" to dogs.

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I may be daft, but I would think pet poison control would know quite a bit about what is actually poisonous to different pets, more than pretty much any other source, and especially more than what gets passed from site to site on the internet, just me though.

 

BTW, ASPCA is not a dog or cat organization, it is an animal organization. They have lots of info about animals, not all of it applies to dogs and cats.

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BTW, ASPCA is not a dog or cat organization, it is an animal organization. They have lots of info about animals, not all of it applies to dogs and cats.

It may also be worth pointing out that they operate an emergency phone line which states: "A $65 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.".

 

The problem is not so much knowing what is poisonous (e.g. potatoes contain solanin, an alkaloid poison), but how much is dangerous. What exactly is "a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel."? (and how much cleaning up will a "mild stomach upset" incur?)

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Kale is a good example of that. On another forum, someone just posted that kale is poisonous to dogs. It's not. But it and all cruciferous veggies are thyroid inhibitors and should not be eaten every day, by any creature that has a thyroid gland. To keep our loved ones safe, it isn't always about whether or not something is poisonous, but more about knowing how much is safe and healthy.

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