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Regarding siezures


Tommy Coyote
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Has anyone heard anything about using medical pot to help control siezures in dogs?

 

There has been so much in the news lately about medical pot being able to help children who suffer from uncontrollable siezures. I just got to wondering if the same compound might help dogs, too.

 

I am not advocating giving pot to your dog willy nilly.

 

I did see where there have been more cases of pot overdose in dogs in Colorado since the drug has been legalized. Mainly I think it is dogs finding the pot on a table top or on a countertop and just eating it. If the pot is very strong it can cause really serious side effects for the dogs and they end up in the emergency room.

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Law enforcement dogs help control pot through drug seizures ;) . But that is a different issue than you raised. I understand that cops carry overdose kits for their own dogs.

 

I am reading more about little kids smoking pot, and showing up to school with it.

 

I live in Washington. They just yesterday granted the first license in the State for a retail store here in my little City. I hope the impacts of limited legalization have been thoroughly thought through. -- TEC

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There was an article in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) last summer about the topic of using marijuana in vet medicine. There are a number of vets who have patients using various tinctures of cannabis orally and topically, and while seizures were listed among the uses, most of the animals (dogs, cats, and horses) were being treated for chronic pain or nausea. The gist of the article was that there is enough anecdotal evidence out there to justify studying its use in animals.

 

And yes, I've seen dogs who are high come in as emergencies ;) This article made the clear distinction that it's not about "getting your dog high" but rather giving it a better quality of life when conventional practices aren't enough. I think it is very interesting, myself. Thanks for bringing it up!

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I just wondered if it might help some of the dogs whose siezures are difficult to control.

 

I was around a dog who had uncontrollable siezures just one time and it was just the most awful thing. The siezures just never stopped. Even under heavy sedation. The vet said that it was about the worst thing that vets ever have to deal with. They thought the dog had come into contact with lead.

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Tommy,

Lead is definitely one of several things a good vet should rule out first before diagnosing a dog with epilepsy. But from what I can see border collies very often have very severe seizure. One of the pups from my kennel died within four months of the onset. And they were terrible.

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