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Hips - Cornell VS PEN?


Betsy
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Can someone explain what exactly is the Cornell test for hips? I've done a search for the term "Cornell" and did not find what I'm looking for.

 

Also, how does the Cornell test compare to PEN hip?

 

(Asking for a friend of mine, so excuse my poor terminology if there is any.)

 

THANKS!

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Here's a question from my friend. She warned me I may get flamed for the OFA statement.

 

"I guess my question is why is ABC still using OFA for the standard for hips? Is there a possibility that PenHip will be used in the near future? I don't have a lot of faith in OFA and far to many dogs that are OFAd excellent seem to have a problem with fluid movement. "

 

Anybody have any thoughts?

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The thread is still there in the FAQ -- only posts older than 9/15/03 in the General Border Collie Discussion forum had to be purged. The easiest way to get to that thread is to scroll down to the FAQ in the list of forums and then click on the underlined red "Re: Info for Cornell hip..." over on the right. The other way to do it is to enter the FAQ forum, and at the top right change the box that says "Show topics for last 10 days" to "Show all topics" and then click on "Go."

 

For background behind the Cornell test, the best thing to read IMO is Dr. Todhunter's article at the "Canine Hip Dysplasia" link posted by Kim above, and Denise Wall's article at http://www.stilhope.com/hipartical.htm . Denise's article also has a very good comparison of OFA with PennHIP. My opinion is that PennHIP is not particularly suited to border collies, because our breed needs a certain amount of hip laxity to do the quick cutting movements required in herding, and they compensate for it with increased muscle mass which holds the joint in place. Therefore, passive joint laxity, as measured by PennHIP, simply isn't that good a predictor of degenerative joint disease in our breed. But if I were you, Betsy, I'd refer your friend to Denise's article.

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Eileen -

 

Yes, I can read the post titled 'Info for Cornell Hip consult" in the FAQ section. What I cannot find is the quoted posts in that thread.

 

For instance, the 3rd post (from Denise) in that thread is quoting something she (Denise) previously wrote, I'm assuming it was a previous post on these boards. Maybe it's not. But if it were, a search using the term "Cornell" should show it, but I can't find it.

 

Anyway, I'll direct my friend to Denise's article.

 

Thanks!

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Betsy,

 

Most of the pertinent links have already been posted so I'll just address a couple of things for clarity's sake from my point of view.

 

There are two types of evaluations available from Cornell that are being discussed in this thread. One is the new DLS procedure, which is described in the link Kim provided:

 

http://www.sheepdog.com/Todhunter/diagnosis.html

 

The other is a consult service provided by their radiology department for x-rays using the same hip position as the one OFA evaluates. ABCA now accepts results from either this type of evaluation or OFA for certification on the registration papers of dogs that they have been found free of hip dysplasia. It was this evaluation that was being discussed in the FAQs thread.

 

Later in the thread, you wrote:

 

"Here's a question from my friend. She warned me I may get flamed for the OFA statement.

 

"I guess my question is why is ABC still using OFA for the standard for hips? Is there a possibility that PennHIP will be used in the near future? I don't have a lot of faith in OFA and far to many dogs that are OFAd excellent seem to have a problem with fluid movement. "

 

Anybody have any thoughts?"

 

The traditional OFA-like ventrodorsal position (whether evaluated by OFA or Cornell) is still the standard for diagnosing hip dysplasia at this time, whatever people feel are its faults.

 

PennHIP does not evaluate whether or not a dog actually has hip dysplasia. It gives a number (DI) for passive laxity that is supposed to predict (with varying accuracy depending on the DI and breed) whether the dog will develop hip dysplasia.

 

As far as using PennHIP for hip dysplasia free certification on ABCA registration papers instead of, or in addition to, OFA or Cornell -- there is no information PennHIP provides that can be used to assign a hip dysplasia free status. The DI value definitely cannot, since it's only a predictive measurement. And while PennHIP does include an OFA-like view and reading in their procedure and evaluation, this view is not consistently evaluated by a qualified radiologist or even a veterinarian. There is also no assignment of hip dysplasia or no hip dysplasia on this evaluation. We on the ABCA Health and Genetics Committee have looked into using the OFA-like view from PennHIP for hip dysplasia free certification on the registration papers, but felt the evaluation standards were not high enough to accept this portion of PennHIP's procedure as proof a dog does not have hip dysplasia.

 

I hope this answers your questions. If not, please feel free to ask whatever needs clarification or more information.

 

C. Denise Wall, PhD

ABCA Health and Genetics Committee Member

ABCA Director

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