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What's the weather like where you are?

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I live in one of the cooler parts of South Australia, but we just experienced our hottest December day ever recorded at 45.8C (114.4F) for Friday 20 December 2019.

As I write this, I have woken up to a Saturday where the forecast is for a maximum of 19C (66F). 

This weather change in less than 24 hours is insane, from super hot to comparatively cool but pleasant.

So I am curious about the weather where you live. What sort of extremes do you get? Temperature, humidity, drastic changes, wind, storms - wild weather tales wanted!

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I'm in Northern CA, about an hour from San Francisco. Our high temps here have been mid 50s, Farenheit, to lower 40s, which is a fairly moderate winter for us. Further inland it's much colder. We've also been having a good amount of rain, I'll have to look to see where we are as far as total rainfall to date this rainy season. Will let you know.

Summer temps can reach high 90s and above here and there, mostly in August/September. 

Ruth & Gibbs

ETA ~ Nov/Dec of this year we've had a total of 9" of rain. Nov/Dec of 2018 was 6" of rain. Our dry season is from about May through October every year. If the first 2 rainy months predict Jan - April, we may have close to 40" in the 19/20 rainy season. And, we could have floods again.

 

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I live in northern Pennsylvania USA. It was in teens and 20s during the weekdays  but this weekend I heard it is supposed to get up to 50s this weekend. We got about 3 feet of snow so far this winter but it keeps melting since temperature keeps fluctuating. I normally get sinus headache due to the pressure changes with the weather flip flopping back and forth. At least we have pretty falls. Lol My dogs don’t seem to mind too much.

We haven’t had to deal with fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, flooding, or many tornadoes... the worst we get is snow which I love. 

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We are in far northern California, on the Oregon border in a 2500' elevation valley whose climate is semi-arid.  We've had a pretty typical winter so far (typical for the last decade, at least - before that it seems like we got more snow).  Right now we have howling winds and the threat of rain today with snow later on, maybe not down to the valley floor.  Mount Shasta has a great snowpack, and the Sierra snowpack is 113% of normal - good news for drought-plagued California!

My heart is breaking for fire-ravaged NSW :-(  Glad things are somewhat better in SA.

Amy

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Southern Arizona, here. Summers the temperature can (and does) reach 115 degrees F, with the temperature often not falling below 100 degrees for days at a time. It's just something you have to get used to.

In the winter, it can go below freezing, although it doesn't often. Usually winters here are great, which is why we have so many snowbirds that spend the winter here. Daytime temperatures range from the 50s to the 70s, with nights being in the 30s and 40s. Fall  and spring are great as well.

Most of the time, no matter what time of year it is, the sun is brilliantly shining and the sky is a deep clear blue. This is what drew me to this area in the first place. The climate and countryside here are beautiful.

Right now it is raining, and about 50 degrees. We love rain here, because we often don't get enough,. In the summer we have Monsoon, with heavy rains and storms that green up the desert, but in the winter rain is less common. When it rains in the winter we are especially happy about it because some years it will go for months without rain and that is very hard on the desert plants and animals.

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Northern Maryland here. Weather is all over the place. I’ve been trying to renovate one pasture per year for the past several years. The process involves planting grass seed (not cheap: think $500/acre, not counting cost of labor/fertilizer/lime) in late summer/early fall, and doing a rain dance so it germinates before grasses go dormant in the fall.

Fall 2017: Pasture #1 renovated. No rain for six weeks following seeding.

Fall 2018: Pasture #2 renovated. Incessant rains (2-3x annual average that year) made it impossible to plant seed on a normal schedule. Waterlogged soils meant seed didn’t germinate well once planted. Standing water in pastureS *all winter long*. “Poverty rush” (sheep won’t graze, hard/impossible to mow, no effective sprays) grows up throughout Pasture #1 

Fall 2019: Pasture #2 overseeded (after brush-hogging a couple of times and spraying to try to control woody perennials that took over newly renovated pasture). No rain for close to two months after seeding. 

More recently: back to too much rain. Too much mud; hoping sheep don’t develop foot scald. Mud up to my ankles in places. Temps two weeks ago at a sheepdog trial were bitterly cold (as in, people sat in cars with heaters on). Yesterday temps were in the mid 60s and no one needed a jacket. 

I’d be thrilled with some sort of happy medium. 

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Central Minnesota and we have seasons.

In the winter, it can get down to -40C, although that is rare. Typical winter temps Dec-Feb) are around -10C (although lately it's been warmer than usual and temps are between 0C and 1C during the day). We usually get a couple of weeks of -20C and below in Jan/Feb.IMG_0037.thumb.jpeg.b73138518f0ebc99adab680f171b7b42.jpeg

Spring and Fall are mild between 10C and 20C

Summer is moderately hot with the average temps in the 20C - 30C range and a handful of days 37C+

It's moderately humid here too except when it gets really cold in winter when the moisture basically freezes out of the air.

The dogs do well in the complete range of temps. Obviously need be careful when it gets over 75F/24C. In winter, they can work at any temp but usually by the time we get to the coldest months Jan/Feb, there's too much snow to work sheep or dogs in unless absolutely necessary, but they'll happily go for runs down to -25C with no bother.

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