Jump to content
BC Boards
gcv-border

Bone broth

Recommended Posts

Recently, I have been hearing, and reading, about bone broths (for both humans and canines). A lot of the narrative reads like the old 'snake oil' advertising - it cures anything, and everything, that ails you. So I would like to try to separate fact from fiction.

 

Has anyone been feeding bone broths routinely? And why? Have you noticed an improvement in your dog? Do you purchase the bone broth or make your own?

 

I tried making bone broth with some rib bones in the freezer. I knew that the broth would not be gelatinous because I wasn't using joint bones, but I thought that there still might be value in the broth. Any opinions on broth from non- joint bones?

 

Opinions, experiences and thoughts are welcome.

 

TIA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feed my dog honest kitchen, and they have a bone broth with turmeric that I give him occasionally.

I use it mainly in this period, when we come back from our morning walk and it is freezing outside.

I was thinking to try doing my own using a pressure cooker, this is how my mom prepares the broth at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make it for Finley. I roast a chicken, then simmer the carcass with a turkey neck or 2 and some chicken feet and a splash of apple cider vinegar all day. Separate the grease off and strain through cheesecloth. It sets up and 'gels' nicely every time and I get enough to last about a month (freeze it in containers that last 5 days or so). Separates when you freeze and thaw, but I heat it again and it re 'gels' in the fridge.

 

As for the why....I don't believe all the hype is true but figured it can't hurt. He gets some with every meal with some cooked chicken breast, his probiotics and a supplement to help with loose stool plus a tablespoon or 2 of canned food....I guess it's a half homemade topper for kibble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried making bone broth for myself and it tasted disgusting. Probably I did not make it correctly.

For my dogs I occasionally will crock pot some meaty bones or some chicken along with veges for their kibble topper.

I don't think bone broth is any kind of cure all or anything all that fabulous. But if a dog or person would not eat and would only drink, it would be a good way to get some nutrition into them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there is any difference between stock or broth... other than maybe I do cook it longer than I would if I were making chicken soup and it does develop a stronger flavor and get more gelatinous. Fin likes it, he eats kibble so it's a way to add more moisture to his meal and I do think there is probably some nutrition in it. It doesn't aggravate his food sensitivity or give him loose stools so that's a plus in our book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sort of wonder if this is a resurgence of the days when 'beef tea' was the magical health food- possibly because of a desire to market imported beef in the days before refrigeration. And beliefs that you could distill 'essences' of meat that could sustain strong men for several days etc. Florence Nightengale talked about how people thought that beef tea was the most nutritive of all foods (and how it was wrong).

 

I can't see it providing comparable value to meat. But I'm all for more stock in the world, even if just for flavour and having more gelatinous foods. Pig's feet are a much undervalued dinner. And maybe if people get into the habit of collecting and freezing and using bones, we might get less food waste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We buy all of our meat (that we don't raise ourselves) from local farmers, so making stock is something we do every week or two in our house (a big kettle of it is simmering as I write). Yes, it's a great way to use chicken carcasses/lamb or beef bones. It's also a great way to use those okra pods from the garden that were so big as to have gone to woodiness; bottom parts of asparagus; parsley stems from the batches of pesto we made last fall; leek greens; the last few cloves of garlic that are too small to want to mess with. Throw everything in the freezer, then transfer to the soup pot. Strain and chill overnight, then transfer to one-quart or one-cup containers and freeze. (We waste almost no food. What isn't eaten, is converted to stock, is fed to the chickens, or (in the case of vegetable peels that the chickens won't touch) goes on our compost pile. The only thing that goes in the trash is citrus peels or avocado skins/pits, pretty much).

 

Except we use most of it ourselves - only on rare occasions will we part with enough to use as a kibble topper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We buy all of our meat (that we don't raise ourselves) from local farmers, so making stock is something we do every week or two in our house (a big kettle of it is simmering as I write). Yes, it's a great way to use chicken carcasses/lamb or beef bones. It's also a great way to use those okra pods from the garden that were so big as to have gone to woodiness; bottom parts of asparagus; parsley stems from the batches of pesto we made last fall; leek greens; the last few cloves of garlic that are too small to want to mess with. Throw everything in the freezer, then transfer to the soup pot. Strain and chill overnight, then transfer to one-quart or one-cup containers and freeze. (We waste almost no food. What isn't eaten, is converted to stock, is fed to the chickens, or (in the case of vegetable peels that the chickens won't touch) goes on our compost pile. The only thing that goes in the trash is citrus peels or avocado skins/pits, pretty much).

 

Except we use most of it ourselves - only on rare occasions will we part with enough to use as a kibble topper.

 

Yep. We meal plan and meal plans include making stock for stews and soups out of the leftover bones. Less waste and no canned stock tastes as good as what you make with meaty bones and veggie leftovers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You usually need to do a fast, hard boil for about 20 minutes, then skim the foamy crap that floats to the top. Then do a low simmer for a long period of time. Otherwise, yeah, it can be gross.

 

It's stock. I've always given it to animals. I've always used it myself. It in no way cures anything. Except maybe an upset stomach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bone broth (which may be a confusing term since it already means something else) to which I am referring is a jelly-like consistency, not the watery stock/broth that can be purchased in the store or simmered for a few hours on the stove-top.

 

Here is a link which is representative of other links I found when searching "canine bone broth recipe"

 

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/reasons-your-dog-love-bone-broth/

 

(and yes, I know not to believe everything I read in Dogs Naturally magazine, but still, it is an interesting idea)

 

I was wondering if I was getting a richly nutritious broth by extended simmering of rib bones with apple cider vinegar. I found out that without cartilaginous bones, the jelly-like consistency doesn't develop, but was hoping that otherwise, it would develop into a very nutritious broth (albeit lacking the chondroprotective compounds infused into the broth from boiling cartilaginous bones). Probably, no one knows without extensive testing. Apparently, the best I can hope for is that at least it cause any harm, and may add some minor nutritional benefits.

 

I agree with a previous poster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is "bone broth" different from what we have always called "stock?"

In my house broth is boiled bones, but stock has celery and onions added for flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a huge believer in bone broth for gut health. Some people drink it straight, but I find that disgusting so make a lot of different soups out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a huge believer in bone broth for gut health. Some people drink it straight, but I find that disgusting so make a lot of different soups out of it.

 

What would make it good for one's guts, specifically? I had not heard this, just curious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The stock I make and *Does* turn to gel. Broth is watery and made primarily of meat. Stock should gel, ,because it's getting the collagen out of the bones. It's also consomme in other cultures and *also* sets up like jello when cold (well some of it, not all - norse in particular tend to slice it and put it on open faced sandwiches). As a FYI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What would make it good for one's guts, specifically? I had not heard this, just curious.

 

It's supposed to provide easy to digest nutrition for damaged intestines, as well as help them heal with it's amino acids. I have a lot of health issues stemming from my gut, and bone broth, along with tons of dietary restrictions and supplements has made a lot of difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Internet nutrition experts; half of your food ís superfood, the other half pure poison...

 

That's true, but I didn't get my information online-my Dr. is what I'm going by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...