Jump to content
BC Boards
Jenny and Charlie

Bad incident during walk

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

Charlie ripped a woman's jacket today on his walk. She was walking very fast behind us talking on her cell phone. I saw that she was walking extremely fast and thought we should pull off onto a driveway like we usually do, but we were on a very narrow stretch of sidewalk with a retaining wall on one side. Before I knew it she was right next to me and was about to walk into the road to pass us, and that's when Charlie jumped up and bit her coat sleeve. It ripped and some stuffing came out, but she was physically unharmed. He immediately calmed and did not pursue or growl, but I felt horrible. I offered to pay for damages but she didn't seem interested and just told us to control our dog. My husband's stance is that she should never have come up on us that quickly on such a narrow sidewalk. There's not really any room to walk side-by-side, and we had no where to go. But my stance is that most people are just not dog-savvy, and while I know to never walk up on a strange cornered dog, I can't expect everyone to do the same.

 

It might help to know that it was dark and I'm 8 months pregnant, and Charlie's very protective. That protective drive definitely increased when I became pregnant, but is there any training I can do to soften it? He's an absolute love bug if you're in his known circle of people, and he likes to get pets from strangers when we're out and about. But if you're a stranger on or near his property, he's fear aggressive.

 

I'm so thankful no one was hurt, and she seemed so engrossed in her cell phone conversation that she just kept walking despite my insistence on paying for the coat. But I know how delicate these situations are, and other than pulling off into a yard or driveway when I know someone is coming behind us, and letting them know to stay away (things I almost always do), I'm wondering if there's active training that can be done. I don't want him to be the victim of a dog bite law.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My old boy was not good with anyone invading his space, especially quickly like that. I was always scoping out my environment to be sure he had plenty of room if people were coming past us - pulling off, as you describe. I'm not sure what else you could do except be always vigilant. Sorry that happened - it sucks when your good dog does something that makes you worry.

 

Strangely, a couple weekends ago I was at a yard sale when a man and small boy came toward me with a dog. The dog seemed to want to meet - was pulling toward me - so I reached out my hand and started sweet-talking to her. Suddenly, she lunged at me and tore a hole in my pants!

 

The neighbors told me the dog had bitten several dogs, that it was a challenging situation. I was scared, but could tell that the dog had good bite inhibition: it was more nip than real bite. Because there was a small kid there, I didn't really make a fuss. But I did want to tell the Dad that he really shouldn't let the dog approach strangers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so sorry, this stress you do not need now....with a baby on the way. Do you think Charlie would have stayed calm if he had been on a very short leash? I know you have a plan of action when you can step aside.....but I wonder if you went to a really short leash with a mantra of Easy if he would have been okay. Another option, step on the leash with him right next to you keeping from the harness or collar clip, under your foot to the leash in your hand taut. This limits his movement and you can achieve this restriction quickly ( great to practice).

 

Also, it would not help in this instant....but a service vest that says in training, no touch, no talk may give you extra space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang. From my understanding your BC is not mean just leery of strange people in his space until you introduce them and they are acquaintanced. That seems somewhat normal with BC's from my experience with them.

 

Yoti has never bitten anyone (10 months old). He will bark at strang cars that comes to our house and when they get out. If I go out and say "Yoti" he will come to me and I'll pat his head. Then if I walk him to the purpose it's love fest 2016.

 

The other day a road work truck stopped in the road directly infrint of our house and Yoti didn't bark but in ran up our drive way and stopped sit down and watch those men EXTREMELY intense. I thought any second he would bark and run at them but he never did. They got back in and left. They never actually stepped in our yard.

 

Another time about 2 months ago a dude walking down our road and Yoti seen him and bolted at him barking and ran up to edge of the road and was barking pretty good. The dude jumped back, scared. I said "Yoti" and he immediately turned and came to me. That was at 8 months old and the road work men was 10 months old. So I think he may have matured and learned a little since thewalking dude.

 

Also another story is there is one other BC in my area and my brother in laws mama lives beside of it. She told behind name is Sheldon and he's on an electric collar.

 

We went there one time and Sheldon went crazy barking and thought dang is like to pet this awesome BC but he'll bite me for sure. It took about 10 minutes of me saying his name and creeping forth and finally he calmed down and let me pet and play with him. And that's with the owner not even home.

 

If I had rushed him like the woman did y'all I'm sure he would have bitten me out of uncertainty. I'm not sure what you can do that your not already doing. You know to move over off the sidewalk. I reckon if you come to play where you can't move over you can pause and check for people both ways. If there is somebody then create a situation that allows them to pass safely then continue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

\

Also, it would not help in this instant....but a service vest that says in training, no touch, no talk may give you extra space.

 

14SxNIacg1XHRxamZ3GIvV.jpg

 

This thing is my salvation against both people who don't pay attention and against idiots determined to believe all dogs love them. It's not 100%, but it actually does buy us room from all but people who are actually jerks. Those people I just yell at. Is it polite? No. It does, however, seem less rude than 'let my dog explode at or bite them'.

 

Molly's actually very friendly with most people these days, but she's that way BECAUSE I've stopped people approaching her for... well, a year/year and a half at this point and she's stopped being defensive about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I knew it she was right next to me and was about to walk into the road to pass us, and that's when Charlie jumped up and bit her coat sleeve. It ripped and some stuffing came out, but she was physically unharmed. He immediately calmed and did not pursue or growl, but I felt horrible. I offered to pay for damages but she didn't seem interested and just told us to control our dog. My husband's stance is that she should never have come up on us that quickly on such a narrow sidewalk. There's not really any room to walk side-by-side, and we had no where to go. But my stance is that most people are just not dog-savvy, and while I know to never walk up on a strange cornered dog, I can't expect everyone to do the same.

 

I must respectfully disagree with your husband. The lady was not trying to engage your dog, and she was minding her own business entirely. Her behavior after the incident was more gracious than 99% of other people's in this situation. People have a right to walk on public pavements at a pace and in style of their own choice even if it is straight form the Weird Walk Academy or Odd Gallops College.

 

I applaud your attitude about the incident and I feel your anxiety concerning your dog's behavior (I have dog with a similar problem). I would start by training the dog to wear a muzzle, so that you can work out this issue relaxed, without being scared that he might bite (your description seems to indicate that you were tense before it happened, you should work on consciousness of how you tense your muscles and body and on relaxing them), because your emotions will only exacerbate the issue.

 

The second thing I would consider is trying to see what makes him think (in terms of your relationship and interaction) that he can have this sort of initiative. Make him realize that it is not what you want, both by training obedience in commands, training in obedience to a "no" - practice by not allowing him things, making hims stop other innocuous activities, observe whether you let him get his way in everyday life.

 

Third thing is dogs rarely lunge without showing tension first. React to this tension, with a calm and decisive no, engage him so that his attention is on you not on the person. You too don't pay (tense) attention to the person, this is a wrong clue for the dog. With a muzzle it should be easy.

 

I hope this helps some in addition to other things suggested here, and I wish you and yours all the best. It's hurts when our beloved dog causes trouble, but they are pack animals and predators, so what we are doing is teaching them to live in an unnatural environment. He was just doing what he thought was being a good dog. Now you have to communicate to him, he is mistaken and what it is that you do want of him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty much everything Maja said - yes.

 

On another note: you have a dog who has exhibited a problem/behavior. In one month, you're going to have an infant in the house. If your dog is that protective of you - what will happen with the babe? Will he protect YOU from the baby? Will he protect the baby from YOU? Will he protect both of you from anyone else??

 

You need to be the dog's protector, not vice versa.

It may not be in your cards, but I'd research a veterinary behaviorist - now, not tomorrow.

You may be looking to rehome the dog in a few months, and I'm guessing - because you ARE concerned and are seeking help - that you won't want to do that.

 

Please do something, soon. And best of luck to all of you in your growing family!! (seriously, I'm not being facetious here...)

 

diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cal is a total jerk when I'm pregnant. With my first, she'd snarl at anyone who even dared to approach me. Like, full on snarl with teeth, slobber/drooling, and crazy eyes. Now she just guards me - posture low and stiff, tail down, ears lowered, teeth ready to be bared but seems more at ease and actually allows people to approach as long as I remain relaxed and welcoming.

 

It subsided as soon as kiddo was born and started back up when I was about 12ish weeks along with this next one.

 

We're currently working on just controlling her response rather than her desire to protect me. She's going to guard me, we've figured that much out. Now we just have to strongly signal that snapping/chomping/being a frightening jerks are NOT okay responses to feeling protective. I treat like crazy when she sits nicely by my side and keep petting her. I also go out of my way to greet new people in a big way (for instance, a new neighbor...I made the poor girl hug me and Cal definitely relaxed after I initiated the approach and physical contact and THEN introduced Cal).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hardly doubt she'll look to rehome the dog because of one instance where the dog may not have even been fully to blame...What an alarmist thing to say!

 

Also, I had the same issue with Cal with my first child and she's obsessed with him. She actually guarded him too and we worked on easing off that behavior slowly and carefully.

 

Charlie could have been startled, feeling protective, or just feeling out of control because of how fast the woman approached and reacted just because. Obviously there's a need for some behavior modification and a behaviorist isn't a bad idea, but really, it's silly to start dreaming up aggressive behaviors from one incident!

 

Pretty much everything Maja said - yes.

 

On another note: you have a dog who has exhibited a problem/behavior. In one month, you're going to have an infant in the house. If your dog is that protective of you - what will happen with the babe? Will he protect YOU from the baby? Will he protect the baby from YOU? Will he protect both of you from anyone else??

 

You need to be the dog's protector, not vice versa.

It may not be in your cards, but I'd research a veterinary behaviorist - now, not tomorrow.

You may be looking to rehome the dog in a few months, and I'm guessing - because you ARE concerned and are seeking help - that you won't want to do that.

 

Please do something, soon. And best of luck to all of you in your growing family!! (seriously, I'm not being facetious here...)

 

diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A service vest for a dog that is NOT a certified service dog is not a good idea and will receive a lot of backlash from the service dog community.

 

A Service Dog performs a task of some sort for someone with a medical need or disability such as identifying seizures, being available to help a person up, to reach/fetch an item, or to indicate low blood sugar. It is NOT okay to put a service dog vest.

 

There are plenty of alternatives such as "DO NOT PET", "ASK TO PET", "IN TRAINING" vests or leash labels (velcro things that hang off).

I am so sorry, this stress you do not need now....with a baby on the way. Do you think Charlie would have stayed calm if he had been on a very short leash? I know you have a plan of action when you can step aside.....but I wonder if you went to a really short leash with a mantra of Easy if he would have been okay. Another option, step on the leash with him right next to you keeping from the harness or collar clip, under your foot to the leash in your hand taut. This limits his movement and you can achieve this restriction quickly ( great to practice).

Also, it would not help in this instant....but a service vest that says in training, no touch, no talk may give you extra space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think she's referriing to the patch I often use with Molly - it's not a service dog thing. It's a Julius K9 Harness with patches that say 'STOP. NO TOUCH, NO TALK, NO EYECONTACT" and it's fantastic. There's also no official 'service dog' vest, and many service dogs have a similar harness and patches.

The problem isn't in the gear. The problem is if you present your dog as a service dog or label them as such (via a patch that says 'service dog' or by treating them such and demanding access rights or outright lying)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...