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Hey,

Anyone here compete in AAC trials? If so, could you fill me in on what to expect? I hear it's like USDAA, which I love. Since BC is about the same distance as Oregon from me, and this area is mostly NADAC, I'd love to escape to BC to get in some more USDAA-like competitions.

 

Also, info on what to expect and what to bring when crossing the border with dogs would be appreciated.

 

THANKS!

Laura

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I have never been to one, but know some people that have. If they like USDAA they usually like the AAC. The are pretty close. Only the AAC doesn't have as many jump heights, they DO have the crossover, and they don't have as many games as NADAC. But they have more games then AKC!

From what I have heard, it is a great org. to trial in. Very nice and fun, but not as quite as easy as NADAC (so USDAA people tend to like it more than NADAC lovers).

 

About crossing the border:

I know that you need proof of vaccs - not just tags. Sometimes you need the whole signed vet paper that says the dog is healthy and OK to travel. But other then that, it isn't to hard to get a dog over the border. If you were doing it often to trial you would have all those papers and it would be pretty easy I would think.

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Oh yeah, and it has been awhile since you could delete posts (that is why there are more posts that just say "double post" - because they can't delete them like before, so they just edit them)

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I crossed into Canada with my dogs in July and I just had the print out from my Vet of their Rabies Vac cert. it was photocopied signed. I had no trouble at all.

 

Here's the website about crossing the border, it includes pet info:

http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/region...ional_1170.html

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You don't see the crossover very often, unfortunately. It is one of my favourite pieces to train on but as an AAC Judge it can be a pain in the butt to design courses around as it takes up so much room.

 

You aren't going to see too much difference in courses for the standard rounds, except we are more restricted as to course design for Starters standard.

 

You are also going to see different course design depending on the judges, just like USDAA.

 

In gamblers you have 40 secs in the opening to collect points - we have mini gambles that can be done for double the point value of the obstacles in the mini, and then the main gamble. Starters and Advance need 20 points in the opening to qualify and Masters you need 28 - for regular and specials. The gambles test obstacles discrimination, directionals, or combinations thereof, and the distance required varies in Starters (10 - 14 feet), Advance (14 - 18feet) and Masters (18 - 22 feet). Those distances apply to the mini gambles as well.

 

Snooker is played similar to USDAA, but you always have the same amount of time - 60 secs in Starters and Advance, and 55 Secs in Masters. There are 3 or 4 reds, depending on what the Judge designs. You need 37 points in Starters and Advance and 40 points in Masters for regular and specials. We don't have as much discretion in dictating how the courses can be run. i.e. if there are 4 reds in the course, we can't dictate that you can only do 3.

 

Steeplechase is relatively new - just brought in last year but runs the same as USDAA.

 

Specials dogs jump one jump height lower that they would normally - A frame is 5" and there are no spreads. You cannot bounce back and forth between Specials and Regular.

 

Vetarans are allowed a double drop - i.e. a dog jumping 26" as a vet can drop to 22" vet and then to 16" or can go directly from 26" regular to 16" vet.

 

You are also allowed to jump 1 jump height higher than your dog measures, so if you have a dog that normally jumps 22" you can opt to jump 26", but you have to stay at the same jump height for all classes at the same trial.

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I just write USD when I send cheques for US trials (and speeding tickets), so I imagine you could write CDN on your American cheques ... or use money orders.

 

Slats are optional on teeter and dogwalk. In BC, you rarely see a slatted teeter, though you might see a slatted DW. A-frames always have slats.

 

I've taken the liberty of selecting for you your first AAC trial. :rolleyes: Come to PAC in October, in Abbotsford. 8 (yes, 8) steeplechase runs, with a run for the money at the end. 3 standard, 2 gamblers, 2 jumpers, 1 each of snooker and team. That would be 16 runs in one fun weekend. My Wick wants to meet your Wick!

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Originally posted by wicked:

I was looking at these two trials possibly, although I'm not sure how easy Victoria is to get to...

 

October 7-8, AAC, Saanich, Victoria, BC

 

October 20-21, AAC, Matsqui, BC

October 20-22 is PAC. It's way easier for you to come to Abbotsford than Victoria (unless you live in Port Angeles, in which case you can take the ferry and end up pretty close to Saanich). But 16 runs! Come on, you have to come for that! You only need 10 steeplechase Qs for your title ... you could be 80% of the way there in one trial AND run for the money (which was about $450 last year for 22" Reg). Wick loves getting to the money round and then forgetting how to weave. :rolleyes:
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There's a Super 8 in Abbotsford that is about a 10 minute drive from the site. The PAC trial is unlimited, the DAWG trial in Victoria is limited and will fill fast. Trial organizers have a choice of making them limited, unlike USDAA or NADAC.

 

Wick on Wick! And next year, come to the NW Super Regional and we may have all 3 Wicks!

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So about how many AAC trials are in BC each year? I think this may be a better option than doing so much NADAC. No offense to NADAC lovers, I just prefer USDAA. My girls love NADAC b/c they can just run wide open and barely have to think/listen. However, I prefer a bigger challenge. :rolleyes:

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Lots! If you go to the Island and the Lower Mainland trials, you could do probably 20 in a year. We do about 5, plus AAC Regionals, and a couple NADAC and USDAA.

 

Are you going to the flyball tourney at Argus Ranch (Auburn, WA) in October? That will be Bear's farewell tourney.

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yes I think I'm doing that one. My (new) team is looking for a height dog for that one I think, so even if I can't run, I'll probably still go since it's so close. We're also doing the Ufli one in September. Are you going to that one?

 

Why the farewell for Bear?

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Originally posted by wicked:

...

Why the farewell for Bear?

Because he's frickin' slow and the border collies are getting tired of carrying him? No, just because he's getting a bit on (he's going to be 10, or 11, or 12) and he doesn't have a turn (when you run 7-8 second laps, a stapler turn is ok, I guess). He only started last year (at the same tourney!) and, well, did I mention he's kinda slow?

 

However, unlike an unnamed bob-tailed smooth-coated, one-blue-eye-one-brown-eye border collie, at least he can pass and be passed! Too bad timed run-backs aren't a competition unto themselves. Wick has a very fast run-back. :rolleyes:

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