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Regularly I look after a friends BC who has very fine fur. She regularly is covered in dred locks. I of course encourage her owner to wash her thoroughly and brush her daily, yet he just can't seem to get on top of them.

 

The only thing I find to tackle them is a "furminator" which basically cuts them off. I have also tried corn starch massaged into each one.

 

Does anyone have some tips for easier removal and prevention?

We both use Aloveen leave in conditioner another shampooing, yet this doesn't help.

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I did read about that product and realised that Garnier conditioner has the same ingredients which does help

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Furminators will cut the guard hairs of double-coated dogs (like Border collies), so are not to be recommended. Something like a Mars Coat King does a better job of removing the undercoat without cutting the guard hairs (as long as you use it in the direction of hair growth).

 

Bathing a dog (or letting it swim) will actually cause a dog to blow its undercoat. My rough Border collie regularly blows his coat every summer about a week after we go on vacation, because he swims several times each day. We've learned to watch for the "dreds" and comb them out the minute he starts blowing his coat.

 

I mostly use Show Sheen on this dog to ward off ice balls. If you do use it, be sure to spray it outdoors - and don't let the dog indoors until it has COMPLETELY dried! It will convert your floors to slippery skating rinks...

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I have mentioned this before - Jeefers Pet online has a great rake - Magic Spring 2 row rake black and red - its teeth are blunt and they push in which makes them easier on the dogs skin. They also rotate so do not get caught in hair. I have used these on every breed from labs to great pyrs - they are 5 bucks get 2. I have given them as gifts. They get out that undercoat.

Most bc I know will blow a coat a couple times a year. If you really bush then a few times a week it takes care of most of the hair. A comb will get that longer coat and separate those individual long strands better than any rake/brush if that is what you need.

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Thank you both ladies,

Now I have no idea what "Blowing" a coat means??

Her coat is quite thin and doesn't seem to have an undercoat as I've seen on other BCs. Nor does Elwood my boy.

I'll stop with the furminator and look up the tools you have both recommended...thank you!

 

"Not swimming" is not an option when you live in the tropics 3 minutes from the beach, they both would get heat stroke just having a quick run during summer. I think a quick daily brush is needed which I'm doing for her to keep on top of the ones I have managed to remove.

 

Can you please explain what Blowing a coat means?

 

Suzy

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I love the strippers (aka dematting comb or undercoat rake) like Alchemist links to. They've made it much easier for me to remove massive amounts of fur from Bodhi when he's shedding.

 

For my late border collie x spitz-type mix, whose coat was so dense on her hindquarters that I couldn't get a normal brush or comb through without its pulling to the point it cause her pain, a grooming rake with rotating covers on the teeth was a godsend.

 

For the mats that form in the really silky fur behind ears I think this type might be the easiest to use: https://smile.amazon.com/Safari-W6116-Safari%C2%AE-De-matting-Comb/dp/B0002ARR2W/ref=pd_sim_199_5?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=1JJEYACK3EJXGVX5EJPN

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Thanks ladies,

I looked up all the suggested tools and bought a round tipped metal comb from the supermarket to try before heading out to grooming suppliers.

 

I wet down the dred locks smoothed some Garnier conditioner in wet again and started combing from the bottom of each dred. Even tho most were so bad they were pulling the skin, they came straight out, so much faster than cutting them with the furminator.

 

Great advice,thanks ladies....no more dreds!

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I mostly use Show Sheen on this dog to ward off ice balls. If you do use it, be sure to spray it outdoors - and don't let the dog indoors until it has COMPLETELY dried! It will convert your floors to slippery skating rinks...

I love Show Sheen, for me and my dog. I have liquid (in a bottle, not spray) kind, but nearly killed my husband when I brushed it into Sonic's tail while he was lying on the kitchen floor.

 

Great stuff--but the warning is worth repeating.

 

I never thought of using it for snowballs, will try that tip this winter.

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"Blowing a coat" is when dogs shed their undercoats quite suddenly. It can be triggered by swimming or bathing if it's not something the dog does regularly.

 

Even my two smoothies have undercoats. They aren't as fond of swimming as my rough-coated dog, but the one that swims will start to blow his undercoat afterwards. It's shorter so won't mat the way my rough-coated guy's coat does, but I still need to brush him if I don't want to find clumps all over the house.


Now I have no idea what "Blowing" a coat means??
Her coat is quite thin and doesn't seem to have an undercoat as I've seen on other BCs. Nor does Elwood my boy.

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