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Several others have already made suggestions that came to my mind:

 

train in very SHORT sessions and stop before she is 'cooked'. I want my dog to still be begging to work with me when I end the session.

 

Use whatever motivates your dog most. Similar to what urge to herd explained, physical play may be her thing, or puzzle games or throwing a Kleenex or blowing bubbles so she can chase them or .... food, squeaky toys or tug toys. A top agility trainer in Europe will let her little dog play bite at her arm as a reward. I had a dog that had no toy or food motivators, but loved to have her butt scritched. Think outside the box.

 

To try and introduce her to toy play, a lot of people will use a Lotus ball. It's a padded ball that has 'leaves' that can be pulled apart to get the treats hidden inside. There are homemade versions too - an empty water bottle with holes poked in it so the dog can smell the treats inside. Play with it yourself, throw it about and when the dog shows interest, open the top a give her some treats. With the Lotus Ball, some dogs get really good at pulling apart the leaves to get at the hidden treats.

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Several others have already made suggestions that came to my mind:

 

train in very SHORT sessions and stop before she is 'cooked'. I want my dog to still be begging to work with me when I end the session.

 

Use whatever motivates your dog most. Similar to what urge to herd explained, physical play may be her thing, or puzzle games or throwing a Kleenex or blowing bubbles so she can chase them or .... food, squeaky toys or tug toys. A top agility trainer in Europe will let her little dog play bite at her arm as a reward. I had a dog that had no toy or food motivators, but loved to have her butt scritched. Think outside the box.

 

To try and introduce her to toy play, a lot of people will use a Lotus ball. It's a padded ball that has 'leaves' that can be pulled apart to get the treats hidden inside. There are homemade versions too - an empty water bottle with holes poked in it so the dog can smell the treats inside. Play with it yourself, throw it about and when the dog shows interest, open the top a give her some treats. With the Lotus Ball, some dogs get really good at pulling apart the leaves to get at the hidden treats.

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Several others have already made suggestions that came to my mind:

 

train in very SHORT sessions and stop before she is 'cooked'. I want my dog to still be begging to work with me when I end the session.

 

Use whatever motivates your dog most. Similar to what urge to herd explained, physical play may be her thing, or puzzle games or throwing a Kleenex or blowing bubbles so she can chase them or .... food, squeaky toys or tug toys. A top agility trainer in Europe will let her little dog play bite at her arm as a reward. I had a dog that had no toy or food motivators, but loved to have her butt scritched. Think outside the box.

 

To try and introduce her to toy play, a lot of people will use a Lotus ball. It's a padded ball that has 'leaves' that can be pulled apart to get the treats hidden inside. There are homemade versions too - an empty water bottle with holes poked in it so the dog can smell the treats inside. Play with it yourself, throw it about and when the dog shows interest, open the top a give her some treats. With the Lotus Ball, some dogs get really good at pulling apart the leaves to get at the hidden treats.

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Several others have already made suggestions that came to my mind:

 

train in very SHORT sessions and stop before she is 'cooked'. I want my dog to still be begging to work with me when I end the session.

 

Use whatever motivates your dog most. Similar to what urge to herd explained, physical play may be her thing, or puzzle games or throwing a Kleenex or blowing bubbles so she can chase them or .... food, squeaky toys or tug toys. A top agility trainer in Europe will let her little dog play bite at her arm as a reward. I had a dog that had no toy or food motivators, but loved to have her butt scritched. Think outside the box.

 

To try and introduce her to toy play, a lot of people will use a Lotus ball. It's a padded ball that has 'leaves' that can be pulled apart to get the treats hidden inside. There are homemade versions too - an empty water bottle with holes poked in it so the dog can smell the treats inside. Play with it yourself, throw it about and when the dog shows interest, open the top a give her some treats. With the Lotus Ball, some dogs get really good at pulling apart the leaves to get at the hidden treats.

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Several others have already made suggestions that came to my mind:

 

train in very SHORT sessions and stop before she is 'cooked'. I want my dog to still be begging to work with me when I end the session.

 

Use whatever motivates your dog most. Similar to what urge to herd explained, physical play may be her thing, or puzzle games or throwing a Kleenex or blowing bubbles so she can chase them or .... food, squeaky toys or tug toys. A top agility trainer in Europe will let her little dog play bite at her arm as a reward. I had a dog that had no toy or food motivators, but loved to have her butt scritched. Think outside the box.

 

To try and introduce her to toy play, a lot of people will use a Lotus ball. It's a padded ball that has 'leaves' that can be pulled apart to get the treats hidden inside. There are homemade versions too - an empty water bottle with holes poked in it so the dog can smell the treats inside. Play with it yourself, throw it about and when the dog shows interest, open the top a give her some treats. With the Lotus Ball, some dogs get really good at pulling apart the leaves to get at the hidden treats.

 

Yes, and if you want to try a lotus ball let me know - I won one in a raffle at a trial, and it's too big for one dog and the other prefers tennis balls. I took the tag off, but it's never been used. PM me an address and I will happily mail it to you.

 

(Also didn't get to say it then, but Keifer's tunneler's run was GORGEOUS. Good job!)

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We have a Kong Wobbler that she earns dinner from most nights. She knocks it around and it tumbles and drops food.

 

Also, tonight's motivation is evidently pizza. I'm too exhausted to do any real training but we worked on "back" (she backs up) and distance sit with a piece of pepperoni. I got two of each before she decided it was time to mope for the treat and ignore me.

 

Pic incoming...

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Gloria, good points, both of those. A couple of the things I was referring too are ones I've read that say your dog always has to have a collar with tags on it. My dogs don't wear collars.

Or that they can't be left outside unattended, ever, or tied, ever, or crated more than x amount of hours, ever, or put down for any reason without contacting the rescue.

For the last, if my dog ever got so seriously injured that I was sure there was no way of saving him, (vet verified) dog's in agony, etc. there is no way I'd be waiting around for somebody else to give me the permission to put the poor dog down.

The collar one makes sense, but doesn't really pertain to me.

I guess they mostly get under my skin because even though it's your dog, it's not really-you know what I mean?

 

I do know what you mean! :) I have two dogs that wear collars full time and two that do not - because they play and chew on each other, and years ago I had one dog nearly choke his best friend to death when he got his lower jaw caught in her collar. So I could not abide by a full-time-time collar ruling, either. And it would be patently ridiculous for me to hover over my dogs 24-7! They spend plenty of time outside just being dogs. In summer our back door is open so they can come and go at will. So I'd never be able to abide by a rule like that, either. As for terminating a debilitating illness or injury ... My dog, my decision.

 

But I do understand that rescues may have hard-learned, heartbreaking reasons for the stipulations they impose. So, if we want to get a rescue dog, we just have to chose the rescues that we can work with. The selection process works both ways! :)

 

~ Gloria

 

 

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My experience with SMS:

 

I am a veterinarian. I see a lot of dogs, day in and day out. I have practiced in two areas that had large, SMS training facilities. Most pet dogs have some level of training at home with a mix of treats and often ineffective punishment. Most, though obnoxious when asked to obey and stay still for a procedure, can be handled. A few need muzzles. The rare dog needs sedation for even minor things like exams and nail trims. More often, this is due to a lack of handling at home than anything.

 

The SMS dogs are universally and fundamentally different. Every. Single. One. They are fearful, lack trust in their owners and will bite as a result of that fear and lack of trust. They try to bite me, they try to bite their owners. When they look at their owners it is not seeking love, leadership, comfort or guidance. Their looks are wary and nervous. They are trying to figure out when the next shock will come. To the untrained eye, they are very obedient and handler focused. To someone who understands dogs on the deepest level, it makes you want to cry for the harm that has been done.

 

I am not completely anti shock collar. There are a few rare situations where they can work, like rattlesnake avoidance, the worst kennel barkers and car chasers. However, they should be used only rarely and in extreme situations.

 

To the OP, nothing you described about your dog would have made me go for a shock collar. I would have put her on a line, made her earn her freedom and done "nothing in life is free." I hope that you continue to grow as a trainer and use more humane and more effective methods in the future. Try reading articles by Dr. Ian Dunbar, Dr. Patricia McConnell and Suzanne Clothier. They will give you most of the information you need.

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Thank you for your feedback and the info, I'll look those articles/authors up.

 

My experience with SMS:

 

I am a veterinarian. I see a lot of dogs, day in and day out. I have practiced in two areas that had large, SMS training facilities. Most pet dogs have some level of training at home with a mix of treats and often ineffective punishment. Most, though obnoxious when asked to obey and stay still for a procedure, can be handled. A few need muzzles. The rare dog needs sedation for even minor things like exams and nail trims. More often, this is due to a lack of handling at home than anything.

 

The SMS dogs are universally and fundamentally different. Every. Single. One. They are fearful, lack trust in their owners and will bite as a result of that fear and lack of trust. They try to bite me, they try to bite their owners. When they look at their owners it is not seeking love, leadership, comfort or guidance. Their looks are wary and nervous. They are trying to figure out when the next shock will come. To the untrained eye, they are very obedient and handler focused. To someone who understands dogs on the deepest level, it makes you want to cry for the harm that has been done.

 

I am not completely anti shock collar. There are a few rare situations where they can work, like rattlesnake avoidance, the worst kennel barkers and car chasers. However, they should be used only rarely and in extreme situations.

 

To the OP, nothing you described about your dog would have made me go for a shock collar. I would have put her on a line, made her earn her freedom and done "nothing in life is free." I hope that you continue to grow as a trainer and use more humane and more effective methods in the future. Try reading articles by Dr. Ian Dunbar, Dr. Patricia McConnell and Suzanne Clothier. They will give you most of the information you need.

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As far as the invisible fence I have had experience with my dogs at my in laws either bolting out and not coming back or the batteries being dead and no one noticing till the dogs took off.

Another comment on electric fences-

A past roommate was thinking of trying an electric fence for her older golden. I decided to put up a 6 ft cedar fence instead. It was only about two weeks after the fence was installed, when two good size huskies showed up the other side. From the growling, barking, and lunging, I think they would have shredded her dog. I was so glad I opted for the fence. Electric fences might keep your dog in, but they don’t keep other dogs out.

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Another comment on electric fences-

A past roommate was thinking of trying an electric fence for her older golden. I decided to put up a 6 ft cedar fence instead. It was only about two weeks after the fence was installed, when two good size huskies showed up the other side. From the growling, barking, and lunging, I think they would have shredded her dog. I was so glad I opted for the fence. Electric fences might keep your dog in, but they don’t keep other dogs out.

 

 

This. They offer no protection or security for the dog whatsoever. And if a dog does get through - say, it goes after a cat or rabbit or another dog - the adrenaline rush that powered it out through the e-fence won't be there to get him back in.

 

~ Gloria

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I've always wondered about this...If the dog powers through, how do they get back home? I imagine many dogs have the will to return home after the squirrel goes up a tree. I know Cal would have a fleeting interested in roaming before she got lonely and hungry (and I know she knows where home is). She'd be stuck outside and then wander off.

 

I'm glad we have a nice fence - it's a 6 ft. privacy fence on either side and a 4 ft. fence on the back side. The gates are nice because we keep one locked for security and the other unlocked but latched. I'd love to lock both, but my husband says we have to let the gas company in. Luckily, Cal is never outside in the middle of the day during the week when they come check the meter.

 

There's a house down the road from us that has a huuuuuuuge front yard and what must be an electric fence. Their dog always scares the crap out of me by charging us when we take walks. Every single time. I forget they have that fence so I always go on the defensive, jump, and drag both the baby and Cal to me.

 

This. They offer no protection or security for the dog whatsoever. And if a dog does get through - say, it goes after a cat or rabbit or another dog - the adrenaline rush that powered it out through the e-fence won't be there to get him back in.

~ Gloria

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My admittedly limited experience with electric fence is that some dogs are willing to cross it just because they decide they want to, others will cross it in the heat of the moment, and still others will respect it once trained.

 

I got one eons ago when they were brand new, so new in fact that I bought mine directly from the inventor of the original Invisible Fence brand, who was local to me at the time. I got it for a pointer/retriever mix who was a confirmed wanderer. Once trained he mostly stayed home, but sometimes he'd sit near the fence line and decide whether his urge to roam was stronger than his dislike of the shock he got. Most times it wasn't, but the times he just couldn't resist you could see him weighing his choices and then brace himself for the shock. When he'd had his jaunt he'd come into he neighbors' yard on the other side of the fence and cry till someone came to get him and take the collar off for him to come back in. Even though the collar was off, he'd bolt back over the line, still not quite trusting that he wasn't going to get zapped. He's also figure out when the collar battery was dead (no warning beep when he neared the fence line) and would cross if he didn't hear the beep.

 

Later on we trained a female border collie to the fence because she had an intense dislike of another neighbor's dog and would leave the yard to attack it. Once trained she didn't cross the boundary. We had an extra collar with a defective box that didn't work, and as long as she had the collar on she didn't cross, even though it didn't give a warning beep. We'd switch out the collars between the 2 dogs every now and again just to make sure they never figured out for sure that one of the collars wasn't live.

 

ETA: One of the border collie rescues I occasionally volunteer with is OK with IF and I think even often encourages them. The other one that I'm more active with doesn't have a blanket policy against them, but most of the foster homes check off that IF is not appropriate for their foster dog in her or his bio. Several of them have had some pretty negative experiences with dogs who've been exposed to IF and as a result are pretty leery of them.

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Mini Update on the Rescue Situation: The phone interview went great but they're having trouble with scheduling the home visit. They contacted Buckeye Border Collie to do it with us and it sounds like they're either not able to find someone in our area close enough (we're out of range for CBBCR) or they're very busy. So I'm being patient but our rep from Come Bye is really great and says we sound awesome and that the Foster is keeping in touch with him and updating him on the status of each puppy. All four are still technically available and our approval to visit should come through soon, as soon as that home visit is scheduled and done. Today I got an e-mail in response to my question about which food they're eating right now so we can be prepared with a transition bag, and we ordered a new crate, and a few duplicate toys so that the girls don't have to fight over anything until they're very well acquainted.

 

I offered to do a Facetime/Skype walkthrough where he could direct me through my house and I can show him whatever he needs to see, but that's going to be our last resort. I am so anxious because we're missing out on precious weeks with the puppy. By this time with Cal, we'd had her for a month and thoroughly bonded already. I'm going to restrain myself from emailing or texting him again because I'm nearing weirdo territory (I've sent two casual texts in the last week and an email about the food...He seems perfectly happy to give me updates but I don't want to push my luck).

 

But good news so far so let's hope that Puppy comes home soon! I figure that if this all falls through and we're left without a new dog, we'll just donate all the new goodies to the local shelter because we'll probably put getting a 2nd dog on a permanent hold. The puppies ages and our current family situation are lined up perfectly right now, but if we don't get a pup, there's no way we're doing two kids under two, an active adolescent dog, AND a puppy early next year! (Edited to add: Cal doesn't need so many toys, that's why we'd donate instead of letting her have them...She already has two big toy bins and we have some hidden away to swap occasionally).

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We had a similar situation waiting for Livi to come home. She had gotten ill shortly after being pulled from the shelter and tested positive for parvo. They treated it immediately and it seemed to be a mild case. So they told us about her after she'd recovered, then their policy is to wait an additional three weeks after pups come off of antibiotics just to be sure (especially with parvo). Those three weeks seemed like an eternity! And yeah, I think I approached weirdo territory with all of my e-mails too.

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Pupdate: We're approved! Our home visit went great and we talked about the collar training at length. The board asked no follow up questions and approved us within 48 hours. We're going to forgo training this dog the same way and spend a year or so bonding before we enroll doggie in anything more than basic puppy classes. We'll use our friends for people and dog socialization (our dog-friendly social circle is huge now that we're involved in the therapy dog stuff) and we'll do clicker training at home. I so hope this dog is driven by SOMETHING. Anything really! LOL

 

We just have to set time to go out to visit the foster (they're 4.5 hours away), which has to happen on a weekend and in a manner that won't make my one year old melt down. We're thinking we'll put the new crate in the car and Cal has a collapsible soft crate that fits under the stroller, so we'll be prepared to stay the night at a dog-friendly hotel if the ride back seems too tiring.

 

Cal update: We've been working on her collar-free training and it's going SO well. She's really getting super focused and wearing her Go Team vest helps a ton. I guess she really does get that it's "work" time when it goes on! She's been off-leash with me everywhere we go for weeks. I keep a traffic lead on her so I can keep my eyes open for other dogs. She's still pretty reactive with her excitement to meet new friends, so I always hold and sit her and make her wait for the dog to pass. She's been very politely sitting next to me, but I still hold her because I don't think she's that mature that she can contain herself! :P

 

I'll post pics if we end up taking one of the BC girls home!

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That is wonderful news! Dixie is just now a year and a half and we are still fine tuning some things. She keeps me thinking outside the box with our training as she presents completely different challenges than our other current border collie. Can't wait to see some photos and hear some updates. It is great that you were patient with the rescue and will hopefully be very happy with your new pup!

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post-17030-0-87217700-1475900394_thumb.jpg

 

Someone likes her holee roller (on sale on Chewy, by the way, and SUPER durable).

I put a tiny one in a big one and then stuffed in a squeaky ball and a squirrel. We had to take it away a few min ago since it's bed time and it's going to be the first thing she goes for tomorrow morning when she goes downstairs!

 

Anyone else's dogs use their paws like hands?!

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Anyone else's dogs use their paws like hands?!

All our border collies, and most of our fosters, we have decided it is just a border collie special skill

 

Congratulations on getting approval and hope the new edition works out.

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Anyone else's dogs use their paws like hands?!

Tess uses her paws just like hands to flip a frisbee that landed on a flat surface, so she can grab it. I find it amazing, but probably most if not all frisbee playing dogs can do that.

 

Congrats on your approval :)

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I will be patient...I will be patient...I will be patient...

 

I gave in and finally called our rescue contact last week after we hadn't heard anything from the foster regarding when we could visit. She's very, very busy which I totally get but...I want to get my dog, you know? We're missing out on bonding time and I'm jealous that we're also missing the puppy stage.

 

I'm being entirely selfish because I completely understand that this woman has a life, probably a family, definitely a job, etc. I just want my pupper!!!

 

I just emailed her asking for an address because our rescue contact called me on Saturday night (and laughed when I answered with "Hi [first name]!" See, rapidly entering weirdo territory...). Anyway, he said that she invited us on Saturday morning at 11 AM. So we're taking a risk and got a hotel for Friday night within an hour of where she should be located (they give the city in the adoption info but not details) so we don't have to drive 4.5 hours early in the morning with a crabby baby. Our son sleeps great in the car so we'll put him in pajamas, eat dinner, and then once he's groggy for the night, just drive through to the hotel. He'll let us tuck him into his pack n' play without waking up, so it'll be an easy drive in the morning to get breakfast and then our PUPPY!

 

Cal knows something's up. She's been clingy yet so playful this week. I think she's going to LOVE having a permanent playmate even if I do anticipate jealousy too. We're so excited...Even my husband is getting antsy. He says I really got him excited and he can't wait, even though he started out doing this just for me because my heart was set on a second beast.

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