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The price is kind of steep at $7+/dose. It would be helpful for those with only thunder phobia or only fireworks, especially dogs that are a danger to themselves during those times. But for sounds that happen often, it would seem cost prohibitive. Good to see another option out there though.

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Waffles, not cost effective IF you live in an area with daily thunderstorms

Yikes! Daily. I cannot imagine. We love thunderstorms here, watching them roll in, but we don't often get them. Mostly in the summer and the occasional thunder-snow.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The drug has been around for a while but only as an injectable. It was new back in 99-2000 as an injectable heavy sedative (domitor). We use it in combination with an opioid pain killer all the time at my work for sedation to do rads, wound repairs etc. I'm curious to see how it works for the noise phobia.

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A horse tranquilliser (as said above this is not a new med, just a new application, it is btw not only used on horses here but also as part of narcose meds for operation on cats and dogs) I am sure it will work. Practical as an oral gel.

 

But if I needed such a medicine on a daily basis to keep a dog manageable, I would consider more drastic measures.

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  • 4 weeks later...

My clients have been loving this. Depending on the size of the dog, you can get anywhere from 1-2 up to 7+ treatments per dog, however once a tube is open it's only good for 2 weeks.

 

I have a few clients using it and they love it - dog is calm and able to focus on them, not really sedate. It is meant for thunder/fireworks and that type of noise phobia - I agree that for a dog that is consistently bombarded with noises that bother them, or in general just a noise phobic dog, we would look at another option.

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DOBEDVM,

 

What are some of those other options? Star is affected by loud cars, buzzing sounds, such as a saw or drill, and high pitched sounds. She will first react by barking and if possible going after the sound. If she can not go after the sound (most cases) she will grab a toy and tear at it. Sometimes she will run to her kennel. Later when she is coaxed out or comes out on her own, she will refuse to go outside, even if the noise is gone. She is not affected at all by thunder and loves to play in the rain. I will also play a soundtrack on the radio to help cover the sound affecting her. I will be discussed this with her ortho vet, but it helps to have some knowledge before hand. Just today he mentioned the Sileo as a possiblity as she had a negative first exoerience at rehab (you have commented on my other post, regarding rehab). He has used the injectable when treating her with acupuncture. It knocks her out though. No moving around.

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There are a couple of options - first, do you know if your girl is MDR1 affected?

 

I don't know if your orthopedic or your rehab vet is the best one to talk about this, or your referring vet who typically sees your girl - they would be the most likely one to prescribe meds used for daily use.

 

The caveat of course being I haven't seen your girl - but in some dogs I have used clomipramine quite successfully for noise issues (one dog is even affected by the buzzing of insects). For some more isolated incidents I have been able to use things like alprazolam (xanax) for thunderstorms, and trazodone given daily to take the edge off some dogs who were just super reactive.

 

Trazodone may be a great drug to give prior to your visits to enable both your orthopedic vet to examine her as well as them to do rehab - but in some dogs who are exceptionally painful i DO need to sedated them for the rehab. Trazodone can take the edge off the anxious dog but still keeps them quiet. I love it for post-op recoveries.

 

Dexdomitor is the drug in Sileo - its just a very small amount in the oral (transmucosal) version, but the injectable is very useful in my clinic. The dose can be adjusted so less sedation is seen.

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In a more natural option - there is a thunder shirt you can try to see if it takes the edge off her (not just for thunderstorms, but also for the visits), Adaptil (used to be DAP - dog appeasing pheromone) - I love the spray version for spraying down the car), or Solliquin as an oral chew.

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I find the Thundershirt does help my thunder/gunshot phobic dog quite a lot. It does not remove the problem but it seems to help him achieve a level of calmness I don't see without it. I know this does not work for all dogs but it might be worth a try.

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DOBEDVM,

 

Thank you for the suggestions. We have used the pheromones. I plug them in when during the school year when I am teaching, in the room that Star stays in while I am gone. I also have the spray. I am not sure if they work.

 

Star had Trazadone when she was spayed at 14 months last summer to help keep her quiet. The clinic was worried it would knock her out. It only made her sleepy for about an hour and then seemed to have no effect, but I still used it for a week.

 

My vet thinks the Solliquin is a good product for Star. He has ordered some of the tablets for her. I am looking forward to trying them. I would not have known to ask about Solliquin if you had not suggested it. For anyone else interested, the Nutramax website has more info on it, including ingredients.

 

I have not tested Star for the MDR1 gene. I did send away for the kit (from Washington University, I think) but have never taken the swab and sent it in. I should do that.

 

Star is so different from the last border collie I had in some ways. Choco was a very confident dog, though he did not like storms. Star is not confident but could care less about about storms and even loves to play in the rain. Choco was easier to train, Star loves training, but does not make it easy, though once she learns something she has it down pat. She is more "herdy" as well.

 

So thanks again for the advice.

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