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Hello!

I am brand new to the boards (though I have been reading up while waiting for validation for around a month)

 

I am bringing home my first BC pup in about a week and a half. After reading a post about a pup running into the road, my head really started spinning. I had always had a strict no paws on the road policy with my dogs growing up, so if they ever got away from me they would be less likely to step in the street. Now, we have moved into a house with a wonderful yard, but no sidewalks. I also happen to have cranky neighbors who get angry if I step on their grass.

 

So, my question(s), should I walk my pup along the road? Is it worth trying to train him to move over when a car comes? Should I just avoid it all together and resort to the backyard and the park?

 

Here's some photo of my little nugget in case you were curious! :wub:

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post-18644-0-90030900-1455683851_thumb.jpg

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Are you in a more rural, suburban, or urban setting? How big is the fenced in yard?

 

As your dog gets older, it will probably be difficult to get him enough exercise just in the yard or park to fulfill his needs. We're in the outer-reaches of Philadephia, and I can't imagine it working out to not have my dog step on the road ever, but maybe where you are it would work. We cross a number of streets on our walks, when we go other places we sometimes park the car on the street, etc. I'm trying to think of how you could be consistent enough to make that work.

 

I think working on good leash manners, recalls, and maybe an emergency "drop" or "down" command would work better, to prevent the dog from getting away from you and having solid commands to get him to stop before he goes into the road.

 

 

 

Oh wait ETA: PUPPY PICTURES :wub::wub::wub:

 

Every time someone posts new puppy pictures I tell my husband how much I want one. I mean rational brain says no, but puppy brain says yes.

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I imagine that was my post you read. I'll tell you something: Aed has always been trained to stay off of roads. Since the day we got him he had to sit before crossing and only ever stepped onto the road with us. There has never been a point in his life where he's been comfortable being on the road, the few times he's escaped he runs along the sidewalk (except for the moment of trying to chase the car) and when I tried rollerblading with him he consistently tried to pull me off the road and onto the sidewalk.

None of that had any effect when pitted against his genetics, his intense drive to do what border collies were bred to do - herd those things that move.

Prevention goes a long way with a lot of things, but sometimes things just happen. I know the temptation when you hear about something scary is to fight for more control, but helicopter parenting a dog is even less useful than doing it to a kid. Don't worry about the roads. It's an uphill battle that isn't going to achieve what you're hoping it will. Instead, focus on the things that will help you and your dog in a variety of situations. Work hard on impulse control, get a rock solid recall, even add an emergency recall/down/sit if you prefer, and be well aware of how he reacts to cars and other common things before he's off leash.

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There are no sidewalks where I live either, so if I want to take my dogs for a walk from the house (as opposed to putting them in the car and going somewhere else) there's no alternative but to walk on the road. But I keep them leashed when walking there. I always walk facing traffic and keep the dogs on my left. They aren't allowed to cross onto my right side, which would take them towards the center of the road and away from the edge.

 

As for your neighbors, there's always a few feet of right of way along the side of the road. Residents generally maintain it, but it's public property, not theirs, and you're not trespassing if you walk on it. ;)

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Thanks! I guess I'm just being a little over protective. I appreciate all the advice!

 

Are you in a more rural, suburban, or urban setting? How big is the fenced in yard?

 

As your dog gets older, it will probably be difficult to get him enough exercise just in the yard or park to fulfill his needs. We're in the outer-reaches of Philadephia, and I can't imagine it working out to not have my dog step on the road ever, but maybe where you are it would work. We cross a number of streets on our walks, when we go other places we sometimes park the car on the street, etc. I'm trying to think of how you could be consistent enough to make that work.

 

I think working on good leash manners, recalls, and maybe an emergency "drop" or "down" command would work better, to prevent the dog from getting away from you and having solid commands to get him to stop before he goes into the road.

 

 

 

Oh wait ETA: PUPPY PICTURES :wub::wub::wub:

 

Every time someone posts new puppy pictures I tell my husband how much I want one. I mean rational brain says no, but puppy brain says yes.

We are in a county-like city in Va, near Norfolk. So there's not much choice to avoiding streets. As far as keeping my dogs off the road previously, I had some pretty small dogs who would wait for me to carry them across the street(spoiled brats, I know). Our little Tibetan Terrier was quite the fence jumper, luckily he never stepped into the road alone.
I am hoping my BC will be interested in doing obedience, that and therapy work is my main plan for him. Maybe I should trust in my training skills a bit more and focus on his recall early.

 

I have so many pictures of him (we visited at 2.5 &4.5 weeks) I have to supplement with pictures of everyone on here's pups in between!

 

 

I imagine that was my post you read. I'll tell you something: Aed has always been trained to stay off of roads. Since the day we got him he had to sit before crossing and only ever stepped onto the road with us. There has never been a point in his life where he's been comfortable being on the road, the few times he's escaped he runs along the sidewalk (except for the moment of trying to chase the car) and when I tried rollerblading with him he consistently tried to pull me off the road and onto the sidewalk.

None of that had any effect when pitted against his genetics, his intense drive to do what border collies were bred to do - herd those things that move.

Prevention goes a long way with a lot of things, but sometimes things just happen. I know the temptation when you hear about something scary is to fight for more control, but helicopter parenting a dog is even less useful than doing it to a kid. Don't worry about the roads. It's an uphill battle that isn't going to achieve what you're hoping it will. Instead, focus on the things that will help you and your dog in a variety of situations. Work hard on impulse control, get a rock solid recall, even add an emergency recall/down/sit if you prefer, and be well aware of how he reacts to cars and other common things before he's off leash.

 

Yes! It was your post. The prey drive in BC's make me a bit nervous sometimes and your story reminded me of that. I will surly make a strong recall a top priority.

 

There are no sidewalks where I live either, so if I want to take my dogs for a walk from the house (as opposed to putting them in the car and going somewhere else) there's no alternative but to walk on the road. But I keep them leashed when walking there. I always walk facing traffic and keep the dogs on my left. They aren't allowed to cross onto my right side, which would take them towards the center of the road and away from the edge.

 

As for your neighbors, there's always a few feet of right of way along the side of the road. Residents generally maintain it, but it's public property, not theirs, and you're not trespassing if you walk on it. ;)

 

I actually wasn't aware that the city still owned that area if there was no sidewalk! That is some very good info. Now I can tell my neighbor to shove it about his "sensitive grass." :D

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I actually wasn't aware that the city still owned that area if there was no sidewalk! That is some very good info. Now I can tell my neighbor to shove it about his "sensitive grass." :D

 

It might be worth checking with the city to find out just how deep the right of way goes. Then you'll have the correct information to offer your neighbor. ;)

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In addition to the advice above, we've instituted specific commands for crossing the street (green light). We walk a LOT and every day in a largeish city. We've noticed Pivo sees when the traffic light changes and when there is a car coming as he slightly (maybe half a second) anticipates the command. I didn't train this per se, but it makes me feel so much better knowing that if, god forbid, he did ever get out, he could cross the street and walk without getting hit.

 

BTW, I agree about not helicopter parenting dog or kids. Our dear dog has, however, helicopter parented our child since birth. Learning to walk was very stressful. Read frightened border collie saying, "OMG, he fell down!!!!! Why do you keep encouraging him!!!"

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