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Weird dog training advice


simba
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In fairness to the lady who tried to advise you, Maralynn, physical methods can work well sometimes for teaching. Next time line yourself up beside the lady and give her a good hard shove. That'll move her into the correct position, away from your dog, hopefully in the 'down' position if you were really successful, and then you praise and give them a treat.

:)

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In fairness to the lady who tried to advise you, Maralynn, physical methods can work well sometimes for teaching. Next time line yourself up beside the lady and give her a good hard shove. That'll move her into the correct position, away from your dog, hopefully in the 'down' position if you were really successful, and then you praise and give them a treat.

 

 

:D:lol::D:lol::D !!!

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Dear Doggers,

 

When we slaughter I freeze the bones and on special occasions I thaw and dole them out to the sheepdogs and sheep guarding dogs. And every morning, the sheepdogs get tiny bits of my breakfast biscuits. They don't do anything for these crumbs but politely wait. Not much nourishment but they enjoy the ritual.

 

We've a good neighbor with a big heart who decided our non-treat policy was cruel so she brought doggy treats with her when she visited our house every second day? I thought it was funny. The dogs started jumping up and nipping at her hands so she proceeded to try to train them to "sit" which sometimes some did sometimes some didn't. Now when she comes, with or w/o treats the dogs are all over her. She's the queen of chaos.

 

Do I put a stop to it? Nope. I'm hoping even Sentimentals can learn.

 

Donald McCaig

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I have gotten some weird training advice. Off the top of my head . . .

 

1. To "cure" a fearful dog, secure its tail up in the air so the dog cannot put it down between it's legs.

 

Uh . . . huh . . .

 

2. Have a "party" with a severely thunderphobic dog during a thunderstorm (those people obviously do not understand a severe form of the condition)

 

3. Never allow a Border Collie to go in circles.

 

Seriously? This wasn't in the context of an obsession or anything where an unusual measure must be taken - this was general "training advice".

 

 

I'm sure I'll think of more . . .

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In fairness to the lady who tried to advise you, Maralynn, physical methods can work well sometimes for teaching. Next time line yourself up beside the lady and give her a good hard shove. That'll move her into the correct position, away from your dog, hopefully in the 'down' position if you were really successful, and then you praise and give them a treat.

Oh gosh - what an awesome thought! Totally cracked up reading this :D :D :D

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Not from an expert by any stretch of the imagination- but I had spent some weeks training a fearful little jack russell to not lunge and scream at cars when they drove by. Every time they drove by I'd exclaim 'A car, good dog!' in a happy voice, praise her, and treat.

 

Initially she was a screaming snarling mess, who would freeze and hunker down if two came at once and then turn to attack the nearest dog. She'd do the 'spinning crocodile' if a bus went by. Not fun. If off-lead she would run straight for the car and try to attack it.

 

So after a few hours of this training she is able to sit and shake and lick her lips and cry, but without screaming, when a car goes by. A few weeks later and she looks at me for a treat and reassurance when the scary things happen. Now the treats are gone except for when something very unexpected or loud drives by, or she's more worried than usual. She'll flinch back a little when a car goes by fast, then look up happily at me for praise. She can walk down a busy street with cars driving past and have enough brain left under the panic to actually stop and sniff things, or listen to commands.

 

Haven't tried her off-lead obviously, she's not trained for that yet, and I wouldn't walk her unmuzzled with other dogs along a busy road, but I'm very proud of the little dog. She isn't unafraid, but she's learning to deal with the fear.

 

One of my friends told this guy about this training I was doing, and he said to me "You know how to cure that of course? You just bring a stick, and every time a car goes by you hit the dog with a stick. That way she knows to be afraid of cars, and won't get hit by them." I tried to explain that the problem was already that she was afraid of cars. Didn't get anywhere.

 

Don't get me wrong, I'm not a good dog trainer, I'm happy to take advice from basically anyone since basically anyone is more experienced than me. And I'm not above roaring at the dogs when there's need either, and have seen some vicious little sobs whose owners mistakenly thought they were 'afraid'. But there are some things that are just so self-evidently wrong.

 

 

Edit: who was on here who had someone else try to teach their dog via treats? The woman asked the dog to sit, the dog hesitantly did, the woman did a pat-pat-pat "Goooood doooog" and shoved a treat into the dog's mouth, which was then spat out? See, the image I had in my head reading that, the sequence of the human, is pretty much exactly what I pictured for your friend after 'down' Maralynn.

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I've heard that you can tug with your dog but you must always win or your dog will think its dominant and not respect you.

 

LOL!! Oh yeah!!

 

Right up there with, "never tug with your dog, it will make the dog aggressive".

 

And, your dog will "think it's dominant" if you:

 

A. Allow the dog to eat before you

B. Allow the dog to go through a door before you

C. Allow the dog to walk ahead of you

D. Allow the dog to "be at your level" (on the sofa, bed, etc)

 

Basically, if you don't micromanage every detail of the dog's life at all times . . .

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Someone once told me that dogs eat their owner's dirty socks, etc., because they want to take the human's essence into themselves and thus become more like the human. Or something very like that.

 

Humans make up some weird s**t.

 

Ruth and Gibbs

That is such a weird thing for someone to say lol

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Someone once told me that dogs eat their owner's dirty socks, etc., because they want to take the human's essence into themselves and thus become more like the human. Or something very like that.

 

Oh, that is bizarre.

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Same thing about "levels", I read once that you can't sit on the floor near your dog because that puts them on your level. And I actually heard a trainer spout that stuff about the not playing tug in case it creates aggressive. He was an assistant to the main trainer and she promptly made him look like an idiot for saying it. :lol:

A little more sinister, I had someone come up to me while Aed was just a puppy and I didn't know much about training and start talking about how I needed to make him know who was boss and be dominant over him and force him into obedience etc etc. She then leaned down to pet him and before I knew what was happening he was whimpering and squirming because she was squeezing the back of his neck so hard until the pretext of "training him". Needless to say as soon as I realized I told her that that was quite enough and we walked off. I wish someone would dare to try that on me nowadays, when I'm more confident in my training methods and beliefs.

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Thankfully, I've never had stupid training advice given to me though a brother did tie a chicken on Duke's neck when I specifically told him not to. Duke ate the chicken. Brother abandoned that idea.

 

 

LOL!! Oh yeah!!

 

Right up there with, "never tug with your dog, it will make the dog aggressive".

And, your dog will "think it's dominant" if you:

 

A. Allow the dog to eat before you

B. Allow the dog to go through a door before you

C. Allow the dog to walk ahead of you

D. Allow the dog to "be at your level" (on the sofa, bed, etc)

 

Basically, if you don't micromanage every detail of the dog's life at all times . . .

 

I heard the tug one and believed it for awhile when I was younger. The never let them win, that is. And them I graduated to never allowing them to growl while tugging. Thankfully, I've given up that also.

The other ones, I've heard of all of them, and did C for awhile. Now I don't care who goes, first, eats first, etc. But they do have to wait until I say for A and B. I think that's self control though, and nothing to do with dominance.

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A local farmer told me he trains his sheepdog puppies off horseback. This was ten years ago, I had just gotten my first BC and was wide eyed looking for any "advice" the old man could give. All the while I am wondering "how the hell do you correct the dog from way up there?" His solution? Whenever the pup does something wrong he shoots it with a pebble from a slingshot!

Yeah, whatever. Aint gonna happen, not to my dog.

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You can only train things in a set order.

 

Different disciplines don't mix.

 

"I am an expert in training because I have had dogs for years."

Haha ! I read a quote recently on a training site in respect to the "I am an expert because I have had dogs for years.

It said, "just because you have owned a vagina all your life, doesn't make you a gynaecologist"

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I've heard the tugging and the you must enter all places before your dog a lot, but the weirdest to me was that you shouldn't show your dog any affection for the first few weeks so it will know you're dominant.

 

Oh, I've heard that, too.

 

Also, keep a dog crated and segregated at all times unless you are directly interacting (micro-managing) the dog. (Not for safety or anything, but just to keep the dog "interested in you") UGH!!

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They were very insistent it wasn't sexual, and there was a bit of derision for anyone who would think this was odd or sexual or not a necessary training practise. Though they did say one of their clients refused on the grounds that "I'm not gay"- and eventually gave in and it greatly improved his dog. You know the pattern.

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