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Experience with McNabs? Just adopted a rescue puppy.


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Reliable and interesting McNab info:

 

http://flyballdogs.com/personal/mcnab.html

http://stockmanship.com/?p=313

 

Comments on Bud Williams (noted livestock handling guru now deceased) article above:

My initial working dogs were McNabs from Doug Lane. I could write a book recounting gathering cattle with him and his McNabs…much of it more than a little hair raising. :o Hands down the best Lane dog I had was "Baldy" circa the early 70's who could easily been mistaken for a classically marked, black/white, medium smooth coated and prick eared Border Collie.

 

Dean Witter (Lone Pine Ranch) was the Witter of stock brokerage fame and fortune. Lotsa of bucks and hence Lone Pine was comprised of a staggering amount of acreage and cattle. The Wiggin's ranch mentioned in the article was adjacent to a ranch we leased from 1976-1988. The other local ranches noted are still in existence. Most ran significant numbers of sheep as well as cattle. The former were phased out (i.e. succumbed to the pressures of depredation, mostly coyotes) long ago. Also mentioned was Rich Hunt who is now in his mid 80's. Hunt & Son's are one of the largest stocker operations in the county. They have a small (2,500 acres) ranch across the road from us.

 

The McNab and derivitives (assorted crosses, primarily with local working Kelpie lines who've proven their mettle) are common place here. When asked, 99% of ranchers would unhesitatingly refer to their dogs as McNab's. More than anything else, its a reference to dogs who originated from the Mendocino ranch that gave rise to their name and not a "purebred"breed per se in the classical sense. Read "I bred my good bitch Queenie to old John's tough Tip dog and got a whale of a nice bunch of heading dogs". Pedigree purist's aside, ability was all that mattered then and now. In a nut shell, they're short coated, athletic dogs with a strong work ethic and admired for their gathering ability in the face of challenging circumstances. Mandatory in this steep, decidedly rugged and heavily timbered environment.

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Is the pup a known McNab/Border Collie mix? Nothing in the pic screams 'McNab' at me. What a cutie, regardless!

 

Amy

Hi Amy,

 

I got him from a herding dog rescue and they understood the dad was a McNab and the mom a full Border Collie both from a ranch in Oregon. And I agree, he is a cutie! He is strong willed and full of self confidence.

 

Becky

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Reliable and interesting McNab info:

 

http://flyballdogs.com/personal/mcnab.html

http://stockmanship.com/?p=313

 

Comments on Bud Williams (noted livestock handling guru now deceased) article above:

My initial working dogs were McNabs from Doug Lane. I could write a book recounting gathering cattle with him and his McNabs…much of it more than a little hair raising. :o Hands down the best Lane dog I had was "Baldy" circa the early 70's who could easily been mistaken for a classically marked, black/white, medium smooth coated and prick eared Border Collie.

 

Dean Witter (Lone Pine Ranch) was the Witter of stock brokerage fame and fortune. Lotsa of bucks and hence Lone Pine was comprised of a staggering amount of acreage and cattle. The Wiggin's ranch mentioned in the article was adjacent to a ranch we leased from 1976-1988. The other local ranches noted are still in existence. Most ran significant numbers of sheep as well as cattle. The former were phased out (i.e. succumbed to the pressures of depredation, mostly coyotes) long ago. Also mentioned was Rich Hunt who is now in his mid 80's. Hunt & Son's are one of the largest stocker operations in the county. They have a small (2,500 acres) ranch across the road from us.

 

The McNab and derivitives (assorted crosses, primarily with local working Kelpie lines who've proven their mettle) are common place here. When asked, 99% of ranchers would unhesitatingly refer to their dogs as McNab's. More than anything else, its a reference to dogs who originated from the Mendocino ranch that gave rise to their name and not a "purebred"breed per se in the classical sense. Read "I bred my good bitch Queenie to old John's tough Tip dog and got a whale of a nice bunch of heading dogs". Pedigree purist's aside, ability was all that mattered then and now. In a nut shell, they're short coated, athletic dogs with a strong work ethic and admired for their gathering ability in the face of challenging circumstances. Mandatory in this steep, decidedly rugged and heavily timbered environment.

 

Hi 76 Bar,

 

Thank you for the information! There's not much out there about these dogs. The idea that they are prized more for their ability than breeding is nice to hear.

 

Becky

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I've met a few McNabs and a few McNab/Border Collies. Every time I have sworn they were a slick coated border collie. I think they're a little bigger, sometimes with docked tails, and occasionally more aggressive on stock than some border collies. In my limited experience they're BC's that happened to grow up in a certain area. They may have some kelpie or ACD in them, but they have been close enough to all the border collies I've known that I wouldn't consider them any different. Others may have different experiences though.

 

I have really liked all the ones I've met! Your pup is gorgeous, be sure to post lots of pictures! :)

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Is the pup a known McNab/Border Collie mix? Nothing in the pic screams 'McNab' at me.

 

It's not always easy -- or even possible -- to tell a McNab from a smooth border collie just by looking at it.

 

And that's a purebred. It would be even harder in a McNab/border collie mi8x.

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