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chelstfrox

Been looking for a breeder for so long! Help Please :)

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Where's that hitting your head against the brick wall icon? <sigh>

 

As others have said, Beth, WildBlue and breeders like them are anathema to everything these Boards stand for. Please read the "Read This First" information to see where we're coming from before recommending faux border collie breeders.

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Please don't be to hard on her. What is a little frustrating is we all want to preserve the breed (which I agree with 100%) but it's also a secret club in that no one will give me one!! haha I'm going to try to call a few breeders again tomorrow and see if I can get in contact. I have 6 BC mix puppies coming this spring and they will all find great BC smart owners that I approve of and I sit without my own working BC. Ahh how the world plays games with me ;)

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I think most people here understand that not everyone's born knowing the right way to go about getting a well bred border collie.

 

But you've gotta admit, with all the "Read This First" stuff everywhere on this site, especially when you first sign up, there's really no excuse for not knowing what the BC Boards' philosophy is. :P I suspect that's what's got people's knickers in a twist. I know it's what frustrated me.

 

And I don't think it's a secret club. It's just a "club" (or, more accurately, a way of life and thinking) that doesn't promote itself with slick advertizing and glitzy websites. I've never been treated anything but warmly and with welcome when I went to sheepdog trials as a newbie, or when I started going back again after many years away and no longer with sheep or dogs who actually worked them any more.

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Hi there,

 

Like others have touched on, the people in the East are gearing up for a string of some of the biggest trials of the year (this weekend in PA, all next week in KY, and the following weekend in NC). Please don't be discouraged if you do not hear back for now, because many people are going to be hitting the road this week for 1-2-3 weeks in a row and have a lot to do and a lot on their minds. Be patient and if you do not get a response, try again in a couple weeks. There are many nice people in your area who can help you, just maybe not right now. Cheryl and Dick Williams would be my recommendation for you, they may not have responded because they are getting ready for the trials.

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Okay, I am going to share this even though it's not about a puppy because it may help shed light on any obstacles you think you are stumbling in to. When I was new to the working border collie world (I started with two adult rescues, who both became trial dogs, and with whom I did pretty well at the novice levels), I didn't even know where to look for a pup/dog. I really knew nothing about working border collies; my first rescue was my jogging and rollerblading partner. But a rescuer suggested I take another of my rescues (whose breeding was known) to try on livestock and that started the journey and of course the many wonderful friendships that have developed within this working community over the years.

 

I got a pup from someone who bred her bitch, whom I liked a great deal, to a stud I also liked a lot (because I had seen them run at multiple trials). I knew the owners of both dogs because I had been going to those trials and running my own dogs there and hanging around watching the more advanced dogs/handlers run. So I was a known quantity when it came to buying a working bred pup. Truly, attending trials and getting to know people is definitely a big help.

 

Also, while I was waiting for my youngster to grow up, I kept hearing about a successful open level dog that might be for sale. I am not one to make cold calls, but I did call her owner, more than once, and although the owner was very nice, she wasn't ready to sell (and I don't think it was because of not knowing me necessarily, but that certainly played a part).

 

Then my youngster got old enough to start training. I was a novice training a youngster and I knew enough to know what I didn't know and when I needed to get additional help (specifically teaching her to drive). The person recommended to me for lessons was the same person whom I had called a year earlier in hopes of buying that fully trained dog. I started getting lessons from this person, and once she got to know me she *knew* I would be a good home for her dog and so I ended up being given the dog I had tried to buy. She was the dog I took to the post for my first open run. And I learned so, so much from her and kept her till she died.

 

Granted, she was an adult dog, but my point is that I got her and the puppy (who went on to become my best working dog and took me to the finals on more than one occasion) because the people who owned or bred those dogs got to know *me* through my attendance at trials or taking lessons.

 

I really do believe that the best way to find a puppy will be going to the places where you can meet the breeders (e.g., trials or clinics). Once people get to meet you and know you then you will find many more doors open to you with regard to getting a pup.

 

J.

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I started looking for my first BC before I had internet. I was calling up names that I found in sheep publications. My second dog I got from a guy who put on herding demos at a fiber festival and used his dogs on his own sheep and cattle. I had seen/chatted with him each year for several years and when I was ready for dog #2 I asked him about a pup (and ended up with a 18 m/o). I'm now looking for a pup again and getting about 50% response from people I contact. I think I found a breeder that has what I'm looking for but it will be a 11 hr (one way) drive to get a pup.

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I stalked the two handlers I got Belle and Fee from. Took almost a year to get my grubby hands on one and over five for the other.

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When I was looking for a pup, I sent several emails to working breeders and received responses from everyone but 1 person. If there was a litter in the near future, I always followed up with a phone call--I always asked the person when was the best time to call.

 

Sometimes they would say that they were expecting a litter in X months and they would contact me, but they never did. So, it was important to follow up with the person before the litter was expected to be born.

 

In the end, I had to be very persistant with my chosen breeder. These people get a lot of emails and need to seperate the serious from the tire kickers (my chosen breeder pretty much said this after she ascertained that I was serious)

 

Also, I think that the tone and content of the intial email is very important. You may want to ask someone to read your email, there may be something in it that is actually discouraging breeders from returning your emails.

 

.Added to say: I found the breeders of working dogs to be very kind and helpful. No one refused to sell me a pup. Interestingly, my experience with several hobby breeders of sport collies (located within my state) were much less positive.

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If it's *easy* to get a pup from someone, sometimes that's because it's not a very good person/place to get a pup. Just saying...

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I'm planning on attending a trail in July so hopefully I can meet someone who has a litter planned for next spring. It's hard because right now I'm dog less in the sense that I don't own any. I don't want to rescue a dog as an adult or adopt a puppy. Have 7 BC mix coming in June. I fall in love with many dogs but just really want a dog that I have put a lot of thought and research into. I want to support the working breed much like I support the rescues everyday.

 

That being said it's hard for me to drive 3 hours away or further for a trial if I have 7 puppies here lol I also don't have a dog to work on trials with to be seen by breeders. I'm going to have to be a pest and chat with lots of people to find those that breed ;)

 

I plan on taking about 5 months off fostering when I get a puppy but if I'm dog less myself I can foster around 25-30 dogs a year. That means house training, crate training, leash, manners, behavior problems, learning the stairs, discovering how to play and so on over and over again. I love it but its hard to get too involved in trials until I have my own dog to focus on. If it's between taking a 3 hour drive and being gone 12hrs or spending the day hiking or meeting with an adopter right now thats a no brainer. When I have a dog I can slow down the fostering and spend time with my OWN dog! so excited already haha

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http://www.wildblue.us/ this is where I got my current 8 month old BC puppy from! They're primarily from show lines, so are bred a little smaller, but a lot of working traits and drive have been bred into them! Overall, they are great dogs!

 

 

https://scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/1958419_10200554065093369_2029616539_n.jpg

pic of Skye!

 

 

Sweetie ... no. Show lines are a big negative here. This is a forum for the preservation and promotion of the working border collie.

Please read this:

http://www.bordercollie.org/boards/index.php?showannouncement=1&f=6

 

Best regards,

 

~ Gloria

 

 

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FWIW, I didn't mean that you had to have a dog to trial. But if you want to find good, reputable breeders of working border collies, you sort of need to go where they are, and where they are is at trials, for the most part. If you rescue, you know the value of meeting potential adopters face-to-face vs. just relying on internet contact. That's what people are trying to point out here. Go ahead and be a pest when you do go to a trial--that's the whole point, to meet people and talk to them. The ones who don't have litters planned may know someone who does. As I've gotten on in years, one valuable lesson I have learned is that most good things (jobs, places to live, etc.) happen because of who you know or who you've networked with. Finding a well-bred working dog, though obviously not as crucial as jobs and housing, works pretty much the same way.

 

J.

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chelstfrox, good for you for doing your homework before getting a dog! And thank you for fostering dogs that need homes!

 

You have received a lot of really good advice.

 

I just want to echo what Julie P said, you do not need to run a dog at a trial. Go as a spectator or volunteer! That's a great way to learn and to meet people. Talking to open handlers is the best way to find out who may have a litter planned and when. Meeting people in person is always better than trading emails or phone calls. Also going to a trial will allow you to see dogs in action and you may find one that really strikes your fancy. :)

 

Also just as an example, I have been on a list for a puppy for over a year. And the next breeding is not likely to happen until this winter. That's a two year wait. I'm not complaining one bit. I know I want my next dog from those particular lines. So, I am happy to wait.

 

Best wishes!

Vicki

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Volunteer at trials - it's a great way to make friends and connection, see dogs and handlers you like, and learn a lot.

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Slightly off topic and do not want to start a pile on. I just looked at the wild blue site and there are over 40 border collies there, 25 of them apparently in the breeding program and the other 15+ listed as "youngsters". Is this common for breeders like this?

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Slightly off topic and do not want to start a pile on. I just looked at the wild blue site and there are over 40 border collies there, 25 of them apparently in the breeding program and the other 15+ listed as "youngsters". Is this common for breeders like this?

 

 

It seems to be not uncommon for some of the color breeder types, and their dog descriptions all seem to mention what color genes each dog carries.

 

~ Gloria

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Yes the exact breeder I want to stay away from! That's why I am here asking you guys that have all networked who is breeding litters of well breed working dogs. I am trying to get to trials but all are 3-5 hours away and I will have two litters of puppies coming into my house from rescue this summer. Can't leave them for 11 hours to go and maybe meet someone. Once I get a puppy of my own I will slow down the fostering and get into this world easier. I hopefully will get to fetch gate trials in July it's two hours away. Just have to find someone to let out the pups.

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Chelstfrox,

Could you slow down fostering for a few months just to give yourself a little more time to look for a good breeder?

 

J.

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In regard to the fostering, I would refrain from fostering until you have bonded with your new pup and certainly until it has been completely vaccinated. In addition to the time issues..., you risk bringing disease into your home with fosters, especially pups....parvo, distemper, ringworm, respiratory issues, parasites....

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25 of them apparently in the breeding program and the other 15+ listed as "youngsters". Is this common for breeders like this?

And a bit more questioning is that it took 6 tries to figure out who the sire of an older litter *really* was....no wonder *clear by parentage* carries no value.

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Haha with a dog less house slowing down fostering would be a bad idea. Then I would be even more anxious about not finding a breeder. ;) I will of course not foster when I have my own puppy! I will start fostering again when my dog is around 6 months. This will give my dog a chance to meet many dogs and people. I don't plan to foster as much as I do now with my own dog. I can't see not fostering this summer to go to a few trials and come home to no dogs! To sad haha. I will get out to the July one near me though. Thanks everyone.

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Okay, it was only a suggestion. We can't stop you from choosing to limit your options. Maybe you'll find a breeder at the trial you do attend.

 

J.

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