Jump to content
BC Boards

Recommended Posts

I had a lab x pit x border collie for almost 13 years (adopted her at 1 1/2) and she was the most amazing dog ever. She was smart, reliable, intuitive and such a gentle soul. I know that there are a lot of horror stories out there about pits but I would encourage you to judge your by her actions and behaviour rather than condemn her for the actions of other dogs. As a puppy, she will most likely be a yahoo for some time, regardless of her breed.

 

Whether she is a pittie or not, she should not be allowed to bother your older dog. Teach her good manners or keep them separated until she can behave respectfully.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 58
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I would be the first to agree about NO pit breeds in my home, but that was before I raised one myself and learned what type of dog they really are. I have every right to be afraid of the breed but again I am not. It wasn't the breed that attacked me, it was the owner. I pit breed will react they way that they are raised. If you raise it to be a happy healthy well socialized dog then there is not going to be issues. If you raise it like a junk yard dog that is out for blood then that is how the dog will react. My DH's heartdog was a Pitbull Bull Mastiff mix. I also have a neighbor who has a pitbull service dog, sweetest dog you could ever meet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I've said, I REALLY hope she's not a pittie :( I know someone who had a pit bull with no signs of agression, and one day it was left with a friend's dog alone and when they returned the friend's dog was torn to pieces. Like a crime scene. With my fragile 15 pound miniature poodle in the last years of her life, I cannot deal with that breed. I owe it to her to give her a peaceful and stress-free last few years.

I agree with what others have said in that how you raise the dog is the most important thing.

But.......and please don't take this as a criticism, as it is in no way intended to be...........I cannot help wondering, if you are so very certain you do not want a pit mix, why you got a puppy of uncertain heritage in the first place? I know you went to a shelter, which I applaud, but not seeing either parent does make the puppy's lineage completely unknown.....

 

she's a cutie, and I wish you the best of luck with her.

and, welcome to the border collie boards. :-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will add my voice to the ones that say Pit Bull/Labrador Retriever cross. I've seen plenty of dogs including pure Pit Bull and Pit Bull crosses that have that coloring. Funny how people always assume Border Collie or mix when the Irish Spotting shows up. (And equally funny how many people assume "mix" when a Border Collie is not colored/marked like that.)

 

I too have known several Pit Bull / Border Collie crosses (verified parentage) who were great dogs - never "went off."

 

I think if you are really all that apprehensive about the possibility of Pit Bull blood, then perhaps you should consider rehoming the pup while it's still young. If you do, please do lots of homework before choosing another pup. Many shelters/rescues (not all!) are guilty of trying to convince prospective adopters that a pup is something - anything - other than part Pit Bull. It increases their chances of an adoption.

 

Sorry...

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I've said, I REALLY hope she's not a pittie :( I know someone who had a pit bull with no signs of agression, and one day it was left with a friend's dog alone and when they returned the friend's dog was torn to pieces. Like a crime scene. With my fragile 15 pound miniature poodle in the last years of her life, I cannot deal with that breed. I owe it to her to give her a peaceful and stress-free last few years.

 

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I always become skeptical when I read about incidents like this that happen (whether between two dogs OR a dog and children) when no one was there to supervise. Did these two dogs know each other well? How long had they known each other? Had they been left alone together before? How long were they left alone unsupervised on the day this happened? Were there any high value items laying around (bones, special toys, etc) that could have triggered a fight? I'm not excusing the fact that one dog killed another and I can't even begin to imagine how heartbreaking the situation was for all involved. I just wanted to point out that since they were left alone together your friends may never know what really happened on that tragic day.

 

I certainly think you could (and should) train her not to harass your poodle. You've gotten many good suggestions here, I especially agree with the baby gates and the crate. Once she is crate trained you could also leave her crated while you are away and not have to worry that she may harass or injure your older dog. The situation seems very workable to me!

 

She's quite a cute little girl and it sounds like you have really taken to her! However, if you think you would be at all afraid of her, or constantly worried she might hurt your older dog or others, then it might be worth considering geonni's suggestion of re-homing her. I really hope it doesn't work out that way and I hope you enjoy her for many years to come! All the best to both you and your pup!

Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, I wouldn't leave two dogs loose together while I was gone several hours if there was significant age/size differential between the two regardless of breed. Stuff happens when you least expect it. Might be best to get your new pup crate trained from the get go and then you can always be sure that both dogs will be happy, peaceful and safe while you're gone! Your old girl can still have the run of the house and being crated will always be "normal" for your youngster.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Camden's Mom.

 

It's not just pit bulls. I heard of a west highland white terrier introduced into a stable yorkie pack, got on well with everyone until they were left together alone and the owner came back to a fair number of dead dogs and a happy little red westie. I wouldn't leave any kind of terrier alone with a dog that wasn't from the same pack, especially if they're the same sex.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys are right about her unknown parentage and getting her from a shelter. I picked her because I could see all of her brothers and sisters and they certainly looked more border collie or aussie, one of them even had fluffy spotted fur and a tri-coloration that suggested aussie, and she happened to be the most calm one (at the time). I just figured she got a different mix out of it, and I didn't even consider the fact that she could have a different father than the others. Also, at the time her face looked NOTHING like a pit bull face.

 

On top of this issue I am having a little bit of the puppy blues since she is my first puppy in 12 years and it is obviously a LOT of work. Another dog passed away 3 months ago and I am still grieving a bit from that. She is a totally sweet gal but these puppy blues as well as the pit bull possibility is giving me a little anxiety and I am now questioning whether I made the right decision adopting her. So far I've had her 3 weeks.

 

Edit: My personal opinion also, is that she does not have the face of a dog that is even more than 25% pit bull at most, she has a longer snout and her body is very lean and slender with long legs. Also, didn't anyone look at the pictures of her brothers and sisters? There are lots of dogs out there with "square" faces, not just pit bulls.

 

here is a pic online of a spaniel/border collie mix---I could see her looking like this as she gets older:

 

http://cdn-www.dailypuppy.com/media/dogs/anonymous/jack_border_collie_spaniel_mix_01.jpg_w450.jpg

 

What do I know though....it seems like you guys have seen more dogs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto on what Camden's Mom said.

 

I'm sorry you're feeling worried now about what she is and I hope you can get past that. But I think it's important for you to step back and try to realistically assess both how you feel about her now and how you anticipate you'll feel about her if she does indeed turn out to be a pit mix. Because if you're hesitant or reserved or scared around or about her, it'll come through in your training and handling of her, and she'll sense it.

 

Remember, too, that it's difficult to ID pups from pictures, and also even in dog, so to speak, when they're this young. Are there any trainers or all breed rescues near you who you could ask to take a look at her and give you an unbiased opinion?

 

I don't think anyone here wants to put you off on your puppy, but it is important for you to be prepared and willing to accept that she might not be what the shelter thought she was.

 

I adopted a 6 month old pup about a year and a half ago, and I thought she was a BC pup when I met her. She turned out to be definitely a mix, still possibly BC but also possibly Sheltie (from all the barking she does!), and definitely some sort of sight hound in her mix. Definitely not what I was expecting, in either looks or behavior.

 

I just saw that posted more pics as I was typing . . . earlier pictures are even less likely to be helpful. The younger pups are, the less likely it is to be able to ID them with any accuracy. And as Liz P said, it's quite possible to have puppies with different dads in the same littler. And though this litter looks consistent enough to me to have been a single father litter, it's no guarantee.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On top of this issue I am having a little bit of the puppy blues since she is my first puppy in 12 years and it is obviously a LOT of work. Another dog passed away 3 months ago and I am still grieving a bit from that. She is a totally sweet gal but these puppy blues as well as the pit bull possibility is giving me a little anxiety and I am now questioning whether I made the right decision adopting her. So far I've had her 3 weeks.

 

OMG do I know those blues!!! Camden was my first puppy ever and I nearly contacted a rescue to give him up because I was so overwhelmed. I actually think I was clinically depressed for well over a month, no joke. Now I can't even begin to imagine life without him. :wub: Puppies are really hard but well worth the effort in the long run.

 

Great to hear you are already crating, that'll be good for you and your poodle when you need some down time from the crazy puppy energy! Also I just wanted to second what GentleLake said; absolutely no one here wants to discourage you from your new puppy. In fact I would wager everyone is rooting for you and your gal... we just want you to be sure you can be comfortable with her, whatever breed(s) she ends up being. Who knows what mix she is... all I know for certain is she is absolutely adorable! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, there are plenty of border collies out there with broad pit bullish heads. One of my favorite dogs has a big ol' head and that's how his owner/breeder likes them. Personally I wouldn't worry if there's pit in there. If there is pit, it's not 100%, and although litters can have different sires, it's also just as likely that there was just one sire.

 

I have nothing but border collies. There are some I will not leave loose with the rest of the pack for their own safety, even though my pack is pretty cohesive and well behaved among themselves. But I do have, for example, an epileptic, and a seizing dog can cause a predator reaction in other dogs, even dogs that normally live happily with the seizing dog. Although my dog hasn't had any seizures for the past several years, thanks to medication, I still wouldn't take the risk of leaving her loose with all the others. Same for my old/feeble dogs. My point is that people are often quick to blame pit bulls for such disasters by assuming it's just their nature to kill other dogs, but any breed will turn on another dog if there's sufficient motivation.

 

My suggestion is to focus on the positives with your puppy and don't worry what she might or might not be. Many mixed breed puppies look similar and when looking at photos, the best anyone can do is guess. Even on this thread, you have people who say not a border collie mix and others who say she could be a border collie mix (I'm in this latter group). Why not assume that she *is* a lab/border collie mix and move on and train her as you would any puppy?

 

The blues will pass. We all go through it, but the rewards will be great. Don't obsess over what she is/might be, but instead focus on what you can help her to become.

 

J.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My grandpa has a similar dog. She came from the neighboring farm and honest to goodness, I have no idea what all is in her. She's black and white, stocky as can be, piercing yellow eyes, one rose ear and one floppy ear. She's also very smart, high prey drive, extremely extremely high energy (just sprints everywhere on his 1000 acres all day long), rough in play, fetch maniac, goofy...

 

I look at her and I swear every time I see something different. A lot of times I see pit bull and lab and maybe some herding dog or cur back in there too? Whatever she is, she's a cool dog and a handful. I think she's a Kansas farm special.

Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm....so I gather.....but it sounds weird to me.........

I believe it if you say it happens, I just do not remotely understand how anyone would not be delighted with having a new puppy.

 

(says D'Elle, who has been wanting a puppy for years now)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can attest that the "puppy blues" are very, very real. In all of the books I had read while researching getting a puppy it was never mentioned, but boy did it hit me hard.

 

This is a VERY dramatic comparison, but think of it like postpartum depression in mothers. Obviously postpartum depression is largely hormonal, but it can also be triggered by the dramatic and instant change of lifestyle, disruption in sleep and loss of any routine in life. Clearly pregnancy hormones are not involved, but seems to me the anxiety and stress of a new puppy can bring on a similar type of reaction. It certainly did for me, anyways, and I've never been a terribly stressed out person nor had I ever suffered from depression beforehand. It was pretty awful...

 

My husband jokes that "he lost me there for a few months". :P

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...