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hemangiosarcoma/diet ?


jb777
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This BC forum has been very helpful for me and info from members.

 

I wish I came here a year ago. I just had no idea what was happening to my dog, I come here to learn as much as I can. I don't like mystery about what happens during dogs illness.

 

I miss my dog greatly. It satisfies some part I miss about her to ask questions.

 

I will never let a dog get heavy again.

 

I am OK. I just miss her. She was perfect for me. I'm learning so much, it's good for me. Before I just stopped learning, thinking all is well. Dogs are so fragile. The learning must happen, they don't speak and they don't know what is going on.

 

Thanks

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I must admit. The bond between Human & Canine is so strong, that when broken, it leaves quite a hole. And hard to just start over when you thought you just began. So I guess these are all last minute details to losing a loved dog. Wanting to know every possible angle as to why they just left you alone. 8 1/2 is much too young to feel satisfied, but I will be OK. Time has healed me. Life throws some weird surprises, and I just am a slow changer I guess. Losing my dog has been the toughest thing to deal or get used to. If any of you live on a ranch or land with your animals, it must be like heaven in a way? To be at one with nature, must be nice. I know the moments I spent with her in nature were beyond precious.

 

Thanks for listening to me ramble.

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Look I really can't decide if you are a troll (your comment about cloning your dog so you could post the same thread every 8 yrs made me think that) or if you are so racked with grief and guilt.

 

Let me just say I do live in the country. I have a horse farm. It is nice BUT death is a part of nature and on a farm you experience it all the time.

 

A boarder just lost a 10 yr old horse very suddenly (cancer) it was horrible. I myself just lost a dog last week, yes it ripped my heart out. A new puppy was born last week in 8 weeks it will be moving in with me.

 

Why? Because the best way I can honor a dog is to realize that no matter how painful that final goodbye is, it can not over shadow all the good times, love and fun that my dog brought into my life.

 

Let me ask you this. When you got your dog 81/2 yrs age, if you knew it was going to end like this would you have still gotten her. Was the pain in the end worth those wonderful 81/2 yrs? Those are the questions you need to be asking yourself.

 

Some hospices offer pet grief counseling you might want to give them a call.

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My daughter died at 19. My dog died at 6. Both long before their expected time.

 

It's not the past we grieve for, it's the future we thought we would have that will never be.

 

I don't believe in letting things I can't change drag me under, and that includes any feelings of guilt I may have. Guilt that can't be worked through s destructive; the purpose of guilt is to teach us how to avoid the same mistakes in the future, not to punish ourselves for mistakes we may have made in the past.

 

I learned to dust myself off and move on from my daughter while she was here. Every day I am grateful to her for that.

 

I learned from the way my dog died too, and will not cling on to unfounded hope while a dog suffers again.

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What RoseAmy and Mum said. Death is a huge part of nature. In the natural world, death is ugly. Animals don't lay down and go to sleep peacefully. They starve, they die of diseases or accidents, or they are killed by other animals or natural disasters such as flood/fire.

 

Nature seems peaceful and serene to us because we sleep in our beds at night and get our food from the refrigerator in the morning. We don't see the deaths by the thousands and millions that occur all around us. All the time.

 

I understand the drive to make sense of what causes a tragedy. Believe me, I do. To linger in that state, searching endlessly for the why, is what is against nature, IMO.

 

Trust me on this, too. My pets have mostly died at ripe old ages - 14 yrs and up. It's like a knife to the gut and heart EVERY SINGLE TIME. It does not get better because they lived a longer span. I didn't mourn my old girls less because they died at 15 or so than I mourned Buzz, who died at 10. It is heart wrenching whenever it happens. Whatever time we have with someone or something we love is never enough.

 

You can choose to turn back to life as it is, or you can stay where you are, looking for the guarantee. You'll be looking for a long time, and you will be very disappointed along the way. I think the suggestion of counseling is an excellent one.

 

AND, every minute you spend looking for the guarantee of long life, health and happiness is a minute you will never get back, to spend with another dog or a dear friend or just your own self. Life is too short as it is.

 

Ruth and Agent Gibbs

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I see one big difference in losing a dog (or any other loved person or animal or thing) well before the end of a normal life span. When one dies of old age, we mourn because *we* miss their oh-so-familiar presence and what they brought to our lives. When one dies in what might be called "before its time", we mourn because we not only miss their presence and what they brought into our lives, but we also mourn for the loss of "what might have been" in our future together.

 

Which is worse? I guess it all depends on your perspective but either way, as Pam and Ruth said, it is still a loss no matter how you look at it. You must learn to move on, keeping their memory in your heart, hopefully opening your heart to another deserving animal that needs you just as much (or maybe more), and not battering yourself with "...what it I had or had not..."

 

It's not the same for everyone but the best thing that happened to me when I lost Skye was to get Celt, because I had a pup to concentrate my thoughts and energies on, to hold and pet, and to help mend the pain in my heart. Celt didn't take the place of Skye. Dan didn't take the place of Bute. But they both have helped to dull the pain and make my heart happy.

 

Pam - I am so sorry that you lost your daughter. I can not even imagine the pain.

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I see one big difference in losing a dog (or any other loved person or animal or thing) well before the end of a normal life span. When one dies of old age, we mourn because *we* miss their oh-so-familiar presence and what they brought to our lives. When one dies in what might be called "before its time", we mourn because we not only miss their presence and what they brought into our lives, but we also mourn for the loss of "what might have been" in our future together.

 

Sue, there is a difference in what we mourn when losing someone/something way too early. For me, not necessarily for everyone, the 'when' of the loss doesn't change the amount of the loss. The absence of a loved one, never to return except in memory, is always keenly felt. I'm paraphrasing something I think I read on these boards, that we never 'get over' the loss, but we get used to it. As life goes on, other things fill some of that empty space, but never entirely.

 

I think I've said all I'm going to say about this topic. I wish jb777 all the joy of her memories of her beloved dog, and that she heals from the loss and finds more joy in life.

 

Ruth and Agent Gibbs

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Sue, there is a difference in what we mourn when losing someone/something way too early. For me, not necessarily for everyone, the 'when' of the loss doesn't change the amount of the loss. The absence of a loved one, never to return except in memory, is always keenly felt. I'm paraphrasing something I think I read on these boards, that we never 'get over' the loss, but we get used to it. As life goes on, other things fill some of that empty space, but never entirely.

 

I think I've said all I'm going to say about this topic. I wish jb777 all the joy of her memories of her beloved dog, and that she heals from the loss and finds more joy in life.

 

Ruth and Agent Gibbs

 

I think we are in agreement, Ruth!

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Pam - I am so sorry that you lost your daughter. I can not even imagine the pain.

 

Thank you. At the time, 11 years ago now, I thought I could never be happy again but who would have suffered if I had not given myself permission not to remain in misery?

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Thank you. At the time, 11 years ago now, I thought I could never be happy again but who would have suffered if I had not given myself permission not to remain in misery?

 

Pam, I want to add my condolences, too. And my gratitude that you have set such a good example for the rest of us.

 

Ruth and Agent Gibbs

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