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philosophical and a procedural question on Border collie training


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This is a philosophical and a procedural question on Border collie training. I have read that it is unfair to train more than one dog at a time, because in doing so, it does not give enough training time for the other dogs. With this said, I have worked with border collies for over 30 years.

 

It would appear that there may be merit to this augment. What is your opinion?

 

Bill virginia

 

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are you talking about getting a dog, training it, then when trained considering getting a 2nd dog? or I have 2 pups and try to teach them to sit at the same time?

the second scenario would be unfair and probably unproductive. but if I train one pup for 15 mins, put him in his crate and get the 2nd out and work for 15 mins., I can't see why that would be unfair or lesser training. dogs/pups can only handle short training sessions anyway, so working multiple dogs while others rest and process what they've learned should be more than fair. i'm sure the pros,in any venue, herding, agility, etc, bring up several young prospects at the same time, with practice and training for all.

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Don´t remember who it was, but I read about a top handler training about twenty dogs, next to his day job. He did pretty well.

 

As for me I am training my first "real" stockdog at the moment, And being the novice I am I don´t think having two dogs in training at the same time would be a good idea. The one takes enough attention.

 

That said I do feel the need for a second stockdog for various reasons.

If I would take on a pup late this summer stockwork training wouldn´t start before ten months later, and at that stage Gláma should be more or less "graduated", she´d be four by then. I am hoping for a smoother start for that second pup, because of the presence of well dogged sheep on the farm.

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yes, smalahundur, I agree-it would depend a lot on the individuals experience as a trainer. no sense training 2 dogs poorly LOL. please-i'm not referencing your training-just making a joke.

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Haha, no offence.

 

But it is not so unlikely. I know of some farmers that own three bc´s (or more..) none of them well trained (or trained at all).

They had been way better off in stead off spending the energy/money in keeping those numbers, and concentrate on one dog, getting in some serious training time, even if it was just the basics, teaching the dog recall, down, his flanks, and driving.

 

I think that would have been way more effective.

 

It seems part of the problem at least is the attitude towards training (in some people). If things don´t go as planned, the dog is the first one to blame, and what do you do? Well, get a "better" dog of course.... :rolleyes:

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I like having multiple dogs in various stages of training. During a training session, I take the first dog out for 15 minutes, put that dog up and get the next one out for 15 minutes, then put number 2 up and get number 3. By the time I am ready to work the first dog again, its had a 30 minute break. It's a good system for me.

 

I've done multiple pups before and don't want to every repeat that. Way too much work and not enough focus on each individual.

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Back when I was working and training my dogs more, they're all older now. Wherever we trained at, whether it was my house in the field across the road, or out in the desert, we would each bring several dogs in various stages of training and tie them to a fence or the truck and work one, put it up, then work another. Obviously the older more experienced dogs would help the younger ones by holding sheep and fixing wrecks. This way the younger ones could watch and learn also. I miss those days as I have nobody to work with anymore.

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I also like having multiple dogs at different stages. I think the only way they get shorted is in house time. Dogs that don't know how to behave in the house need to be dealt with one on one, just like any other training situation, but I think they need more than 15 minutes at a time to learn to settle in the house or to find trouble so they can learn to avoid trouble. For us it is almost like living with a dog aggression problem. We have to plan shifts for who is loose in the house or for who needs tethering, or for who(person) is responsible for keeping an eye on whom(dog).

 

My son says I don't know how to use who and whom, sigh, He's probably right, but I thought my way sounded better.

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i guess i'm with the others... i don't quite understand the question. Two dogs on the field at the same time? More than one dog in your kennel? If one had the energy and skill I should think they could start/train quite a few dogs at the same time. As was stated above... train a dog, put it up, grab another and train again... I know some folks that make a living doing just that and their dogs turn out quite well. Well being defined as competent Open dogs.

 

dave

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I asked the question because i am interested in other's opinion. I have three BC, two are working dogs and one a cheerleader. the two working dogs i try to give them equal training time. Very interesting discussion and look forward to other folks opinion.

 

 

thanks

 

bill virginia

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I think I would disagree with this idea. If I take a dog out to train in the morning, I'm done with him in 10 to 20 minutes, depending what we are doing. If it's a pup, I might be done in 5 minutes. Why should I not put him away and get another dog out, and work for another 5 or 10 or 20 minutes? The alternative I guess is to go back to the house and have another cup of tea. ;) In summary, I don't see any reason not to work more than one dog in a day.

Provided of course that I keep a clear mind on which dog I'm working, what that individual dog's needs or quirks are, and where that particular dog is at in his training, at that time. One should never lose track of which dog they are working and what is required to help that dog that day.

Personally, I can't remember when I only had one dog to school! :P
Respectfully submitted,

Gloria

 

 

 

This is a philosophical and a procedural question on Border collie training. I have read that it is unfair to train more than one dog at a time, because in doing so, it does not give enough training time for the other dogs. With this said, I have worked with border collies for over 30 years.

 

It would appear that there may be merit to this augment. What is your opinion?

 

Bill virginia

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