Jump to content
BC Boards

Puppy has hard time staying in yard


Recommended Posts

I have 2 bc. One is 4yr old and the puppy is 7 months. My older one learned to stay in my yard at a young age and NEVER leaves the yard, even when her favorite ball or frisbie goes out in the road. I live on a 3 way corner and the limit of 25 is NEVER observed. I am constantly yelling at people to slow it down. They are going at least 50 and it is dangerous. Naturally the first thing I taught my current 4 year old and my previous bc was NO STREET!

My current puppy has dashed across the street at least 3 times luckily without incident. Each time I practically drag her by her collar and yell NO STREET and put in the house and that is the end of playtime. The main problem is that she is extremely social and knows all the dogs in the neighborhood and wants to dash over and see them if they are out. Once again it happened this evening even after I saw her dog friends outside. I told her again NO STREET. She sat for a moment and then in an instant she was across the street! She will get hit. I don't have an electric fence nor does my husband want to get one. He thinks it is my responsibility to train her. Besides keeping her on a long leash and having a fit when she does go into the street, what else can I do? I am at a loss.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am at a loss as to why you would trust a puppy (even if trained) to stay in the yard. I would never trust any dog (young, old, crippled, BC or non-BC) to stay in my yard. It only takes once. Err on the side of caution and keep her on a leash or long line. Heck, I wouldn't trust an electric fence either - particularly since your yard is so exposed. But then again, I have heard too many stories of dogs losing against cars.

 

Jovi

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am at a loss as to why you would trust a puppy (even if trained) to stay in the yard. I would never trust any dog (young, old, crippled, BC or non-BC) to stay in my yard. It only takes once. Err on the side of caution and keep her on a leash or long line. Heck, I wouldn't trust an electric fence either - particularly since your yard is so exposed. But then again, I have heard too many stories of dogs losing against cars.

 

Jovi

 

This.

 

Its more unusual than not that a dog will quickly learn a boundary so well that when excited by play he will remember the rules.

 

Stick a long line on tied to the house or you step on it and consider finding a more secluded or enclosed place for playing. Or, put in a real fence.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rehome her before the inevitable happens?

 

This is a joke right?

 

Why would you expect a 7 month old to stay in your garden? There are SO many distractions for them at that age. Why do you even let your dogs go off leash near a road where people speed? The solution seems very simple... Keep your dog(s) inside.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would also add that my personal experience is that fences are just a suggestion to Border Collies. If there is something they really want on the other side, they'll sail right over it. In a busy neighborhood, there might be someone who enjoys tormenting a dog as well. Never leave the dog unsupervised even in a fenced in yard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All I can say is wow to these replies.

I have basically solved the problem by keeping her on a long leash whenever we are out in the yard. In retrospect it may sound like a foolish question but I was really taken aback by the sheer bluntness and basically rude and higher than thou attitude. It is very obvious from my post that I do not want a dead dog. Honestly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think people were quite astonished that you have a 7 month old pup (and have had a previous dog that is now an adult) and have lived on a corner without fencing, and wonder what you can do to avoid your youngster from running out of the yard. Physical fencing is the single most effective (when built right) protection from a dog running into the road or getting into a fight, other than being on leash all the time.

 

As one person pointed out, fencing is not only beneficial for keeping your dogs in their yard but also for keeping many unwanted animal intruders out. Those are benefits #1 and #2. Of course, to be effective, a fence must be properly constructed to contain (or keep out) the animals. I am not a fan of the electric fence - it does nothing to keep other animals out; many dogs do well staying within its boundaries but others, when tempted by passing animals, people, or vehicles, may just dash right through the shock, and then often will not come back through it and so are "locked out" of their own property.

 

And, as another responder mentioned, dogs should not be left outside without supervision, no matter how good your fence. An aggressive dog can leap the fence; your dog could leap the fence; a gate could be left open inadvertently; a neighbor or passerby could tease or torment your dog (even a neighborhood cat can do that); and your dog could be easy prey for a dognapper.

 

I hope you and your husband are able to determine what will be effective in your situation and make it happen or, as many have pointed out, your dog could become a casualty that could have been avoided. Trust me, I've been where you are figuratively speaking, and my dog paid the price for my ignorance and naivety.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All of my previous dogs (non-BC -- Lhasa and Shih Tzu) were homebodies. Neither would leave the yard for any reason during any stage of their life. Having Murray and buying a home on a very busy road opened my eyes. We have a 75' trolly run which has a 15' lead. This gives him run of a good chunk of the yard and allows the neighbor's 4 young children space to retrive stray toys without getting slobbered to death. Formal fence is in the works, but I would say a trolly line would be best if you can't do the real fence. (I've heard of too many dogs that cross an electronic line and don't want to be zapped a second time coming back in the yard).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Look up how to boundary train. Very similar to doing with the electric fence flags etc but without the actual electric fence. Put it on a long line for now, put something physical in the grass like flags so the dog has a better idea where he can go and where he can't.

 

Never ever trust them to be alone and respect it, but at least then you have some security in that you did teach the boundary...before they cross it

 

Cynthia

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...