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Jump then turn left

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I am working with my young Border Collie in the back yard. I have a jump set up on the right and a table set up on the left, nearly side by side. The goal is to sent him over the jump and then on to the table crossing behind him. If I send him over the jump, standing on his right, he goes over the jump starts to turn right and then goes left on to the table. But if I start him standing on his left, he turns left straight away on to the table.

 

I have tried turning my shoulders towards the table sooner but then he does not go over the jump.

 

Any Suggestions

 

He is a fast dog and I am not (fast that is). I am trying to learn to work further away from him.

 

 

 

Thanks

 

PS I like herding better because you just get to stand in one spot :)

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You are making too much of a change for a baby dog - i.e. you are standing on his left to get a left turn, then abruptly you stand on the right and expect the same behavior. That takes some training.

 

Start on the left and send to jump, then table to get the desired behavior. Then gradually change your position relative to keeping everything else the same. When I say gradually, I mean move your starting position one inch or 2 inches (not more) towards the right and ask for the same behavior. Eventually you will be standing behind the dog and then will migrate your starting position to the dog's right (gradually).

 

You shouldn't expect to accomplish this in one or two training sessions. Move gradually to your right, then move back to the left (starting position) abruptly when you think the dog is beginning to understand what you are asking of him. Mix it up, but make your expectations clear, and the dog should pay more attention to you. Once the dog knows his job (and not before), you may want to put a verbal command (LEFT) to the same action. Trade out the table for a jump or a tunnel so the dog understands that you are asking for the left turn and not a particular obstacle.

 

Since your dog is fast, you will want to be able to handle at a distance, when appropriate, to save yourself some steps and allow you to get in position for the next obstacle. Use the same gradual technique to train distance. For example, run your dog through the tunnel with the dog at your side (as we all do when we start out). throw a toy reward at the end. Then move a couple of inches away from the tunnel and repeat. Stay at the same distance for a couple of reps, then try an incremental move in distance away. Add the verbal when the dog knows his job, move back and forth, side to side. (Note, when you train the other side, you will probably have to train again by incrementally increasing distance since dogs often don't generalize from side to side.)

 

The take-home lessons are to only change one aspect of the behavior at a time, and to change very, very gradually so the dog isn't put off by the change.

 

Other handlers may chime in with good suggestions. I am always interested in hearing other options.

 

Good Luck,

Jovi

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have you taught your dog the verbal left and right. Without seeing what you are doing, it also sounds like he does not understand the body language for a rear cross, and of course, without a video, we can't tell if you are giving him the correct body language for a rear cross. Have you taught him the pre-cue for a rear cross?

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have you taught your dog the verbal left and right. Without seeing what you are doing, it also sounds like he does not understand the body language for a rear cross, and of course, without a video, we can't tell if you are giving him the correct body language for a rear cross. Have you taught him the pre-cue for a rear cross?

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have you taught your dog the verbal left and right. Without seeing what you are doing, it also sounds like he does not understand the body language for a rear cross, and of course, without a video, we can't tell if you are giving him the correct body language for a rear cross. Have you taught him the pre-cue for a rear cross?

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have you taught this on the flat without equipment first? i believe it's a good idea to teach both, the verbals and body cues away from equipment first, then when i do start adding equipment, i will keep the jumps low, or no bars at all, working on understanding first, less tork on dog's body while "we" learn. i also find, that many times, it is me/timing, not the dog, when things aren't going as planned :), if you can, video yourself just to make sure you are giving clear info to your dog.

 

regarding the title of this post... actually the dog should know how to set himself up for the jump BEFORE he even takes off, for example, correct lead to jump left... so they need the info earlier then later :).

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I was thinking the same. That he either doesn't understand a rear cross or you are not cueing him right. Which leg are you leading with?

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Thank's everyone. It is clear I need to learn more about rear crosses, but my goal for this exercise was to learn how to work further from my dog. Attaching a verbal cue to it like jump left seems to be the answer.

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