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I've recently ordered some buffalo horn from my supplier and the quality of the horn they're getting now is better than I've seen in some time. So I'm going to be making buffalo horn whistles again for anyone that would like one. I've been making whistles for some years and had actually stopped making horn whistles for awhile due to the poor quality of the material that was available. I was the first to make a shepherd's whistle out of Corian, and as far as I know the first to use buffalo horn for a whistle. I'm flexible as far as meeting customers' needs about the shape and size whistle they prefer. Some of the top handlers have been regular customers of mine for years. PM or email me to contact. $40 horn, $30 Corian (includes shipping in US). Thanks.

 

Ray Coapman

(raynamy@4fast.net)

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I would like to order a whistle too but I would like to try a sideways whistle before I order one.

Diane where did you get your sideways whistle that you have now? I'd like to try a cheaper one first if they're out there.

 

I like a straight reg. shape whistle, the A shape one slips out my mouth and the moon shaped one is to big. SO I want to try the a different one before I make up my mind.

Thanks

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And what would you recommend for a whistle for a complete novice. I have no preferences because I'm still at the make hissing noises while driving down the road point. Is any whistle easier than another?

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I found the Montana Lite to be inexpensive (at the time, at least) and one of the easier ones for me to get some sort of sound out of. I did not do well at all with plastic, which was the cheapest.

 

I have a brass whistle which I found fairly easy to get decent tones from but which would stick to my lips in winter weather.

 

At this time, I have a Corian and that seems to do best for me. It has the size and shape of the brass (which thickness, etc., worked well for me) without the freezing factor.

 

Now, I must qualify all of this with the honesty that I pretty much still use all voice commands. Our farm is not that big and I am pretty loud. I need to just make a commitment to whistles and do it (I do sometimes use them for a stop or down whistle, primarily - the dogs are *great* at that off-stock, and not so good on-stock).

 

I am pretty pitiful in the whistle department.

 

PS - I have heard very good things about the buffalo horn. The only drawback I've ever heard is that it may have a distinctive taste that some people do not like.

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GG, Probably the best whistle for a complete novice would be either a triangle or one with the nubs or 'wings' on the bottom (like a plastic whistle). The wings and the corners of the triangle are both designed to catch the corners of your mouth to help prevent you from spitting it out while you're using it. Then you can blow the whistle with a more relaxed mouth because you're holding it with your lips and you don't have to clench your teeth to hold the whistle in place.

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Is it better to begin with the easiest/cheapest whistle or to begin with the whistle you ultimately want to use? I've heard both, that you may as well begin with something cheap and easy since you're just learning, but then also have read from other people here that once they learned one type of whistle they disliked changing. I'm just wondering if it's best to begin with a whistle that produces the best sound first, even if the learning curve is harder simply to avoid the hassle of switching later?

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imo it's best to begin with a whistle that you can reliably get a decent sound out of. You may not be able to effectively use the whistle you think you "ultimately want to use". We're all made differently and there's different styles of whistles to choose from and try. Most of us wind up with a drawer or a cigar box that has all the whistles that we've tried over the years. Some to be tried again, some never again ;) The whistle is a tool, when you learn how to use the tool well the work becomes a little easier.

 

You can also liken the whistle to a musical instrument. How many kids express an interest in playing the guitar. Their well-meaning parents go out and buy a cheap instrument that isn't really playable. The kid's fingers hurt and in a few months he becomes discouraged thinking that he 'can't play the guitar'. Bear in mind that cheap isn't always bad, but you generally get what you pay for.

 

The reason I began making whistles is that all those years ago I couldn't find one that performed well enough for me. I had some that were hard to make a sound with and others that would quit on me if I blew too hard. Faced with choices like that which whistle do you take to the post ? I decided to try to make my own. I experimented with different materials, shapes, blowholes, the whole nine yards. I felt I owed it to my dog/s to come up with a whistle that would help us and not be a hindrance. When I started using it at trials people noticed it and thought it was cool and wanted me to make one for them. Nowadays I also get referrals when trainers are confronted with a 'whistle-impaired' student. Sometimes the student just needs a better whistle.

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I have a buffalo horn whistle that I got through Border Collies in Action years ago. One of your maybe? I also have a BB plastic whistle and someone just gave me a brass Baby Blaster (I think). I've not tried a single triangle shaped whistle or a whistle made of corian. For me, getting a consistent sound AND decent volume has been a major struggle.

 

BTW, my horn whistle had a terrible taste when I first got it, but with use the taste went away.

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Ray,

 

 

Wonderful news! I have one of your buffalo horn whistles from several yrs ago. Maybe if either you or Amy are at Zamora or Santa Rosa trials I could show it to you and get a few more?

 

 

Thanks, you made my day!

 

 

Carolyn

 

 

 

 

I've recently ordered some buffalo horn from my supplier and the quality of the horn they're getting now is better than I've seen in some time. So I'm going to be making buffalo horn whistles again for anyone that would like one. I've been making whistles for some years and had actually stopped making horn whistles for awhile due to the poor quality of the material that was available. I was the first to make a shepherd's whistle out of Corian, and as far as I know the first to use buffalo horn for a whistle. I'm flexible as far as meeting customers' needs about the shape and size whistle they prefer. Some of the top handlers have been regular customers of mine for years. PM or email me to contact. $40 horn, $30 Corian (includes shipping in US). Thanks.

 

Ray Coapman

(raynamy@4fast.net)

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Ray makes wonderful whistles, whether Corian or horn. I have both - and already have another of his horn whistles for my collection! :)

 

I want to also say that I got a Border Collies in Action whistle a while back and like Liz, mine had a nasty "hoof chewy" taste. I rubbed it with a bit of olive oil and the taste eventually went away.

 

BUT ... Ray's whistles don't have that taste. I think he must put a better polish on them or something, so the horn taste just isn't as evident. If you're super sensitive to taste, though, again I think rubbing with a bit of olive oil will help and any taste will soon fade with use.

 

Very glad you're making whistles again, Ray! :)

Signed,

 

A Happy Customer

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Carolyn,

 

Can you email him a photo of your current whistle? That's what I did when I ordered mine. :)

 

See you at Zamora and Santa Rosa!

 

~ Gloria

 

 

Ray,

 

 

Wonderful news! I have one of your buffalo horn whistles from several yrs ago. Maybe if either you or Amy are at Zamora or Santa Rosa trials I could show it to you and get a few more?

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  • 1 month later...

Corian is a hard plastic material that is used for countertops. If you like to grip your whistle hard with your teeth, maybe Ray's buffalo horn will work for you.

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