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well just the dogs. it's that time of year again when the vet starts reminding me that the dogs need their booster shots (not rabies). i've been hearing different opinions on annual vaccines. what say you? is every year needed? upsides? downsides? thanks.

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I booster rabies as required (here in TX, it's every three years).

 

For most of the others, I titre. The titre is a bit more expensive than the vaccine would be, but its not a killer, so I think it's worth it.

 

Annual vaccines run the risk of vaccine related sarcomas, negative reactions, etc. I think there is a pinned post in the "health" section about some of the adverse effects.

 

That said, since my dogs are show dogs (Agility), I have started vaccinating for Canine Influenza. Last year there was an outbreak in San Antonio (i'm in Austin, so, close), and it is a very serious disease. A friend of mine who is a vet strongly encouraged the vaccine because she said that even mild cases of CI can cause lung scarring... not something I wanted to risk. If I boarded them or did doggie daycare, I'd definitely do Bordatella, but I don't... so I don't worry too much about that one.

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It would depend on what is going on in your area and where your dogs go along with what their exposure is to other dogs.

 

We go to trials but there really are not that many dogs at the trials, for the most part it's the same dogs and very rarely do they come in direct contact with one of the other dogs. We don't allow them to play together or anything with other peoples dogs.

 

Our vet has suggested for dogs over a year that have had their puppy shots and the 1 year follow up to either titre or go on a once every 3 year schedule. He is here a few times of year...was just here today, and I always ask him if there is anything new that we need to be worried about so that we can get the dogs vaccinated if we feel that our dogs would be exposed and if there is a vaccine avaiable.

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Go to the Health and Genetics section and read the pinned thread "Concerned about overvaccination?" I personally don't know anyone who is still doing yearly vaccs, except for things like bordatella and leptospirosis (for those who vaccinate for them) because those vaccines don't confer long-term immunity.

 

I get mine through their puppy series and then may do a shot a year later (except for the Intervet vaccine that I used for one set of pups that was labeled for 3 yrs from the start). After that, it could be every three years. Once my dogs reach a certain age, ~10 or so, I no longer vaccinate them at all, except for what's legally required, which is rabies.

 

There are certainly risks that come with vaccines, and even the AVMA is now suggesting a 3-year interval for the core vaccines, so I definitely think that you don't need to get yearly vaccines. What spacing you choose aside from that is entirely up to your own comfort level.

 

ETA: I think also that most problems stem from a huge assault on the immune system all at once. I will not allow my vet to vaccinate for a bunch of things at once. It may be more costly/time consuming to make several trips in order to space vaccines out, but I think from a holistic standpoint of the health of my animal, spacing them out (and avoiding those huge combo--5- and 7-way--vaccines) can go a long way toward reducing some of the risks.

 

J.

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thank you for the input.my dogs also do agility and we travel together for trials and fun times quite often.

 

i was thinking once every 3 yrs or so. kinda like with my dentist-he's only allowed to xray my teeth every3 to 5 yrs. riles him up a bit, but now i find i'm ahead of the curve and perhaps you shouldn't let people xray your head every year. i will read the pinned article.

smalahundar-sorry to disappoint. we'll drink at 5!

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do a search on Dr Jean Dodds and vaccinations, lots of interesting and informative thoughts on vaccinations and their effects on long term health. Her Hemopet website has some good links as does her FB page with blogs on vaccinations, nutrition, thryoiditis...etc

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I come from a culture of "you're irresponsible if you don't vax your dogs yearly". It was a very hard transition for me, but I've transitioned over to a 3 year vax schedule for the core vaccines. 3 years on Rabies too, as required by law here.

 

My previous vet (and this is WHY she is my previous vet) was hard core 1 year. I started exploring, and for the first time I tried titers. Then I read some more and concluded I was comfortable with 3 years, and so I finally found a vet that supported and encouraged a 3 year schedule. I would love to get to a place where I only gave puppy vax and then stopped, but I'm not comfortable there. So for me it's a 3 year schedule (and truly, I think that 3 year thing is an arbitrary number).

 

It's a tough call, but good on you for thinking about it!

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another thing to investigate is cost of titre. There is a wide range of charges for titres. Some vets charge an outrageous price to titre. Hemopet will run titres for $45, of course, there is the additional cost of having your vet pull the blood to send to Hemopet, even considering that "extra" expense it is still cheaper than the quotes from some vets that have been as high as $250.

 

And it is important to spread out the vaccines and not do huge combo vaccines......it does make a difference.

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I do puppy series (either 2 sets or 3 depending on how young when it got the first vaccine). The last puppy one I do is a 3yr one and then I do it every 3 years for the core (parvo, distemper, adeno and parinfluenza). Rabies the first one is good for 1 year and then I do every 3 years. I don't do any other vaccines but then we don't really have any other diseases prevalent around where I am. This is also the recommendation the clinic I work at has although they recommend kennel cough if the dog is going to be at dog parks or boarding.

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Every three years for Core Vaccines. Any other depends on where you live, and the prevalence of that particular disease there.

 

You can always do titers, if you need proof of your dog's immunity. Better than overloading your dog's system with unnecessary vaccines!

 

Rabies is the only one required by law in many States, and that is every three years. If you are not trialing or showing a dog, (keeping your dog at home and don't worry about the dog biting anyone) you don't have to worry about it, because the vaccine is often good for life, or at least, seven years.

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Rabies is the only one required by law in many States, and that is every three years. If you are not trialing or showing a dog, (keeping your dog at home and don't worry about the dog biting anyone) you don't have to worry about it, because the vaccine is often good for life, or at least, seven years.

Just to clarify, rabies laws vary by state and not all are set at three years. You need to know your state laws. Also the laws vary on how an unvaccinated animal will be treated if there's a bite or any chance of rabies exposure. It makes sense to know the laws for your locality. The rabies vaccine very likely does last for more than three years, but if something happens, your local authorities aren't going to be looking at science; they're going to act within the local laws. For example, I have a dog I opted not to vaccinate when last she was due, because she has an immune system cancer. The law in my state says that if she's exposed to rabies or bites anyone, she will be considered the same as an unvaccinated dog, even though she recieved the vaccine at the state-mandated interval for the first 13 years of her life. It's a risk I'm willing to take, but it's best to know exactly how your dog will be viewed legally before deciding not to vaccinate for rabies (because the local authorities can require euthanasia and testing). In my state, an exemption letter from the vet or titers won't even be considered. In other words, if you choose not to vaccinate for rabies, be sure you know what law(s) will apply to you should the worst happen.

 

J.

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my states rabies law is every 2 years so that is what we do. that is something i'm not going to compromise on as we do live in the woods and do have a history of rabies in the area.

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Where I happen to live they require that pups get thier rabies shot at 3 months. Then at 1 year, after that it is every three years. I pushed it to 4.5 months cause I was not willing to risk my pup at that early of an age. I also wanted to make sure he wasn't going to have a reation after having recieved his last set of puppy shots.

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