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Our beloved Angel of 15 years


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My wife and I are so extremely heartbroken and have been shedding a lot of tears as we have suddenly lost our very beloved Angel, a border collie we adopted at about 5 months old and was a member of our family, (our child) for 15 years. I have been breaking down sobbing uncontrollaby several times a day in anquish since it happened.

 

 

She was energetic and healthy right up to the very moment she suddenly started have very severe cluster seizures out of the clear blue sky, we were so stunned, and when taken to the vet they examined her and had offered very little hope and said that probally the best we could hope for was maybe another month or two IF that long, but that she would simply be surviving in great distress, not even able to walk or even stand up, and even that was IF the PB medication worked at all, she said even if it did work it would only slightly diminish the cluster seizures and could take as long as two weeks to even start helping that slight bit (if at all), in the meantime she was having what the vet termed as severe seizures that were damaging to her, she was already at the point where she could not even stand up on her own, she would no longer drink or eat, and the vet said to put her to sleep would be the only humane thing to do. (she quickly had around 8 severe seizure episodes from when it started to when the vet said there was not really any other real choice, and it seemed that the seizures would continue to happen with the same great frequency)

 

 

The vet said that with her being as old as she was (15 years) that it was more than likely due to a brain tumor. At that age it would have been extremely unlikely for her to survive a brain operation even IF it was possible. The vet said because of the likely brain tumor that she would likely not last more than a month or two, if that long, and it would be a very miserable, distressed time for her.

 

 

It was the most heart wrenching decision we ever made, we did not want to lose our precious Angel, but we did not want her to suffer in great distress (not even being able to walk) for the very short time she would have had left, also considering that even inbetween the frequently recurring cluster seizures she was suffering she would be doing extremely heavy breathing and before you knew it another seizure would start again.

 

 

I had held on to hope all the way up to when the vet basically said there was no real choice given her age and the servereness and recurring frequency of the seizures that had already taken their toll on her to where she could not even walk.

 

 

I so hope I made the right decision, it was not the decision I wanted to make, I wanted to cling to hope as long as possible before even considering such a decision, but the vet said her remaining little bit of time would have been very miserable, so as so VERY much we did not want to let her go, I felt it would have been selfish to allow her to suffer so severely any longer, especially since there was no real hope left.

 

 

My mind says it was the right decision, but my heart feels guilty thinking that maybe we gave up hope too quickly, but the vet said what little remaining time she might survive would be miserable for her, but your heart still nags you with the "what ifs" anyhow.

 

 

We feel that at least if it was her time to go at least she did not have to go by way of a long drawn out illness where she would have merely existed in suffering and not have enjoyed life.

 

 

Angel was amazingly frisky and energetic for a dog of 15 years old, she still ran and pranced about like a playful puppy right up to the very evening she started having the cluster seizures out of the blue, that is why it was so hard to believe what was happening, but the vet said it was not unusual at all for a dog that old to seem perfectly healthy up to the point where the seizures actually start happening.

 

 

Angel was not merely a pet, she was (and is still considered) FAMILY. Angel had more love for everyone than some humans I have known, she brought such love and joy into our lives every day in so many ways, from seeing her happy face in the morning, to waiting to be tucked in for bedtime at night, and her puppy-like playfulness during the day and evening, I could go on and on about the many ways she exressed her love and the many ways she behaved more like having a child than having a pet, and how very smart she was, but I have already wrote so much and did not want this post to be too long for people to read.

 

 

It hurts so extermely much I still break down sobbing several times per day since she passed very early Sunday morning October 28, 2012, (I went almost two days without eating until my wife urged me to eat something so I would not hurt my health, she ate a little) (my wife is very much hurting just as much even though I am the one that has a harder time holding in my emotions) I made a special gravesite in the back yard in between two medium bolders I will paint her name on and use landscaping cloth and pebbles to keep it looking neat.

 

 

Thank you for listening to my grief, I know it won't stop the hurt, but somehow it seems to help a little to be able to share this with people that have a simular love for their beloved dogs.

 

Not that we would never get and love another dog, but our precious Angel will still continue to always have the number one spot in our hearts, and we truely believe we will be reunited with her again one day after this life !

 

(in the picture Angel was wearing a lightweight sponge foam advertisment "hat" the store owner gave her at some special outdoor event they were having)

post-14161-098047200 1351746207_thumb.jpg

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I'm so sorry for your loss. You can be certain that you did the right thing for Angel. She'd been a wonderful companion to you for her 15 years, and she deserved not to suffer. It's a very hard time you're going through. I hope the wonderful memories of Angel that shine through in your tribute bring you peace soon.

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I am old (hence my board name). I have been through this same thing all too many times before. It is a heartbreaking and gut-wrenching decision. It fills you with remorse, but when the grief eases you will know that you did the right thing for Angel.

 

In comparison to ours, a dogs life is so fleeting, just a spark and then it's gone. I never have the perfect words at times like these. So I offer this instead:

 

"Grieve not, nor speak of me with tears, but laugh and talk of me as if I were beside you. I loved you so – ‘twas Heaven here with you." ~ Isla Paschal Richardson

 

Godspeed Angel! Good Girl!

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I am so sorry for your loss! But you had no choice. I just went through something similar and it hurts. I love Ancient_Dogs quote though. No better honor to a life shared than to think of all the wonderful times.

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Words can not make your heart heal but please know how much we all care. You did her such a great service by not making her suffer for selfish reasons. She was blessed to have such a caring family.

 

Run Free little Angel, may you meet again someday.

 

with deepest sympathies

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I am so very sorry for your loss. It is devastating to lose a beloved companion so quickly. I lost my Jazz 2 years ago, very suddenly as well. He was not quite 11 years old and I thought he would live a much longer life. I also struggled - did I do what was right. I found this essay and although the pain of losing Jazz didn't diminish, I knew that I had made the right decision. I hope this will help you as well.

Run free at the Bridge, Angel...there are many good dogs who are there with you.

 

 

Dealing with the Guilt.

 

Guilt. It's a word that can invoke in us the deepest, most terrible feelings of loss, horror, anger, and helplessness. Why did I do what I did? Why couldn't I have done more? Did I kill my beloved pet? Did I not do enough? Did I do too much? Did I put him/her down too soon? Did I wait too long? If only I had closed the gate. If only I had noticed sooner. If only I had waited longer. If only I had more money. If only I had rushed to the vet sooner. If only I had known more at the time. If only I had listened to my gut feelings. If only I had gone to a better vet.

 

And we beat ourselves up for all these questions and "if-onlys". Why do we do this? Because we loved our pets. Because we wish we could have done more, or wish we had not done what we did.

 

But we cannot bring them back. We cannot change what we did or did not do.

 

What we can do is stop hurting ourselves over the guilt. Each of us, in our own way, did what we thought was right at the time, using what we knew and felt. Each of us tried to do the best we could, and did it with the intention of love.

 

We are human beings, with frailties and faults. We don't know everything. We make mistakes. But we make them with the best of intentions.

 

To hurt ourselves with the terrible additional pain of guilt is to do disservice to the love we felt for our pets. With very, very few exceptions, we did the best we knew to do at the time. Even if we feel that we didn't do what we should have, or did what we should not have, we have learned, and everyone will benefit from that knowledge now.

 

Our beloved pets are gone, and out of pain. We still torture ourselves with the pain of guilt and doubt. It's human to do that, too, but are we being fair to ourselves?

 

We loved, deeply, and that says that we have a deep capacity for love that many do not. We are basically good people. Should we not recognize that goodness, instead of inflicting pain on ourselves for what we could, or should, or should not have done?

 

We took in a beloved creature, and gave him or her everything we could. We petted, we walked, we fed, we changed litterboxes, we played, we stroked, we sat sleepless on difficult nights. We cared, and did everything we knew to do at the time. And we looked in their eyes, and knew they understood that we loved them. If we didn't know enough, or made an innocent mistake, do we believe that they did not understand, and love and forgive us in spite of it? I believe they did, and that they do.

 

We need to forgive ourselves. If we can, we can increase our knowledge, reach out to help others, and use our pain to make things better for our pets, for others' pets, and for those animals out there who are alone and lost. We can make a difference. But only if we quit hating ourselves, blaming ourselves, for being human.

 

Let the guilt go. Know that your furbabies don't blame you; they understand, because they know your heart. Let yourself forgive yourself, and allow all the love you have to be there for another. There are so many who need it.

 

Learn, and then teach. Keep learning, and don't stop. Every pebble of knowledge and caring you send out will ripple throughout the world, and keep growing. And perhaps in time, every animal will be loved, and well-cared for, and there will be a great golden age for the animals, and for those of us who love them.

 

 

Ginger-lyn Summer

September 10, 1999

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I read all the replies from everyone and we so very much appreciated every reply and this reply to to everyone -

 

Thanks for all the kind words from everyone, it still hurts so very bad, but it does help some to know that there are others who understand from having had to endure such intense grief themselves.

 

The info about dealing with guilt is appreciated, and that quote that was shared - ""Grieve not, nor speak of me with tears, but laugh and talk of me as if I were beside you. I loved you so – ‘twas Heaven here with you." ~ Isla Paschal Richardson - was very nice, and my wife and I have been remembering the all the good times and the various cute things she did over the years and all the love she had for us, it does help, but it still hurts so bad, I go to sleep at night thinking of her and my first waking thoughts are of her and I find myself sobbing in tears. I know time should lessen the intense pain, but we will always miss her, and she will always be number one in our hearts reguardless of pets we love in the future because she was a once in a lifetime very unique bundle of love.

 

I told my wife this morning that many humans sometimes get things backwards and think just of what we provide for our pets, a loving home, food, toys, ect., but need to remember that our pets give us so much more back to us emotionally with the daily unconditional love they have for us, and how very much they gave to us becomes so very apparant by the huge void we feel emotionally when they are suddenly gone.

 

We need our pets as much as they need us !

 

 

 

 

I'm so sorry for your loss. You can be certain that you did the right thing for Angel. She'd been a wonderful companion to you for her 15 years, and she deserved not to suffer. It's a very hard time you're going through. I hope the wonderful memories of Angel that shine through in your tribute bring you peace soon.

 

 

Yes, of course you did the right thing, no need to second guess. You made your decision out of love for your friend. I'm so sorry for your family's loss.

 

 

I am old (hence my board name). I have been through this same thing all too many times before. It is a heartbreaking and gut-wrenching decision. It fills you with remorse, but when the grief eases you will know that you did the right thing for Angel.

 

In comparison to ours, a dogs life is so fleeting, just a spark and then it's gone. I never have the perfect words at times like these. So I offer this instead:

 

"Grieve not, nor speak of me with tears, but laugh and talk of me as if I were beside you. I loved you so – ‘twas Heaven here with you." ~ Isla Paschal Richardson

 

Godspeed Angel! Good Girl!

 

 

I am so sorry for your loss! But you had no choice. I just went through something similar and it hurts. I love Ancient_Dogs quote though. No better honor to a life shared than to think of all the wonderful times.

 

 

I am so sorry for your family's loss. She was clearly very loved by you and your family.

 

And, yes, what a fabulous quote that Ancient_Dog shared.

 

Rest in Peace, Angel.

 

 

Words can not make your heart heal but please know how much we all care. You did her such a great service by not making her suffer for selfish reasons. She was blessed to have such a caring family.

 

Run Free little Angel, may you meet again someday.

 

with deepest sympathies

 

 

I am so very sorry for your loss. It is devastating to lose a beloved companion so quickly. I lost my Jazz 2 years ago, very suddenly as well. He was not quite 11 years old and I thought he would live a much longer life. I also struggled - did I do what was right. I found this essay and although the pain of losing Jazz didn't diminish, I knew that I had made the right decision. I hope this will help you as well.

Run free at the Bridge, Angel...there are many good dogs who are there with you.

 

 

Dealing with the Guilt.

 

Guilt. It's a word that can invoke in us the deepest, most terrible feelings of loss, horror, anger, and helplessness. Why did I do what I did? Why couldn't I have done more? Did I kill my beloved pet? Did I not do enough? Did I do too much? Did I put him/her down too soon? Did I wait too long? If only I had closed the gate. If only I had noticed sooner. If only I had waited longer. If only I had more money. If only I had rushed to the vet sooner. If only I had known more at the time. If only I had listened to my gut feelings. If only I had gone to a better vet.

 

And we beat ourselves up for all these questions and "if-onlys". Why do we do this? Because we loved our pets. Because we wish we could have done more, or wish we had not done what we did.

 

But we cannot bring them back. We cannot change what we did or did not do.

 

What we can do is stop hurting ourselves over the guilt. Each of us, in our own way, did what we thought was right at the time, using what we knew and felt. Each of us tried to do the best we could, and did it with the intention of love.

 

We are human beings, with frailties and faults. We don't know everything. We make mistakes. But we make them with the best of intentions.

 

To hurt ourselves with the terrible additional pain of guilt is to do disservice to the love we felt for our pets. With very, very few exceptions, we did the best we knew to do at the time. Even if we feel that we didn't do what we should have, or did what we should not have, we have learned, and everyone will benefit from that knowledge now.

 

Our beloved pets are gone, and out of pain. We still torture ourselves with the pain of guilt and doubt. It's human to do that, too, but are we being fair to ourselves?

 

We loved, deeply, and that says that we have a deep capacity for love that many do not. We are basically good people. Should we not recognize that goodness, instead of inflicting pain on ourselves for what we could, or should, or should not have done?

 

We took in a beloved creature, and gave him or her everything we could. We petted, we walked, we fed, we changed litterboxes, we played, we stroked, we sat sleepless on difficult nights. We cared, and did everything we knew to do at the time. And we looked in their eyes, and knew they understood that we loved them. If we didn't know enough, or made an innocent mistake, do we believe that they did not understand, and love and forgive us in spite of it? I believe they did, and that they do.

 

We need to forgive ourselves. If we can, we can increase our knowledge, reach out to help others, and use our pain to make things better for our pets, for others' pets, and for those animals out there who are alone and lost. We can make a difference. But only if we quit hating ourselves, blaming ourselves, for being human.

 

Let the guilt go. Know that your furbabies don't blame you; they understand, because they know your heart. Let yourself forgive yourself, and allow all the love you have to be there for another. There are so many who need it.

 

Learn, and then teach. Keep learning, and don't stop. Every pebble of knowledge and caring you send out will ripple throughout the world, and keep growing. And perhaps in time, every animal will be loved, and well-cared for, and there will be a great golden age for the animals, and for those of us who love them.

 

 

Ginger-lyn Summer

September 10, 1999

 

 

Its so hard to see clearly now, when you are swimming in grief, but yes, you did the right thing. We have all been there and share your pain.

 

I'm so sorry.

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I am truly sorry for your loss. Right now, while your loss is new and your grief is raw, it is hard to imagine the pain subsiding. But eventually it will, (to an extent) and when it does, what will remain will be the treasured memories of her 15 wonderful years with you, and not so much, the the tragic day when you said goodbye. She was a beautiful girl, and so lucky to be the recipient of so much love.

 

I think this quote eloquently sums it up:

 

"There is a cycle of love and death that shapes the lives of those who choose to travel in the company of animals. It is a cycle unlike any other. To those who have never lived through its turnings or walked its rocky path, our willingness to give our hearts with full knowledge that they will be broken seems incomprehensible. Only we know how small a price we pay for what we receive; our grief, no matter how powerful it may be, is an insufficient measure of the joy we have been given."

Suzanne Clothier "Bones would Rain from the Sky"

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It's so hard to see at the time, but yes, you did the kindest thing for your Angel. You were there for her when she needed you, and you did what was best for her. I'm so very sorry for your loss. They're never with us long enough.

 

Run free, Angel.

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I'm so sorry for your loss of Angel. I have a dear friend who very eloquently said that we make the decision to end their lives "because we love them that much." You loved Angel and it was your love that allowed you to let her go when that was the best thing for her. Go ahead and grieve. In time, you will be better able to remember all the good times and the love you shared with a smile rather than a tear, though the tears will never entirely recede.

 

This one has made the rounds many, many times, but I love it and think it speaks volumes:

 

 

Godpseed Angel; you're living among your namesakes now.

 

J.

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I am also so sorry to hear about Angel. I think you made the right decision at the right time - as hard as it was.

 

I am glad to hear that you may get another dog in the future - when the time is right. I truly believe that the best way to honor a dog that has passed is to offer our home to another dog so they can feel your love too.

 

Jovi

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Jovi's note made me remember this:

 

A Dog's Last Will and Testament

(Author unknown)

 

Before humans die, they write their last Will & Testament, and give their home and all they have to those they leave behind. If, with my paws, I could do the same, this is what I'd ask....

 

To a poor and lonely stray I'd give:

 

- My happy home.

- My bowl, cozy bed, soft pillows and all my toys.

- The lap which I loved so much.

- The hand that stroked my fur and the sweet voice which spoke my name.

- I'd will to the sad scared shelter dog the place I had in my human's loving heart, of which there seemed no bounds.

 

So when I die please do not say, "I will never have a pet again, for the loss and pain is more than I can stand."

 

Instead go find an unloved dog; one whose life has held no joy or hope and give MY place to HIM.

 

This is the only thing I can give...

the love I left behind.

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Jovi's note made me remember this:

 

A Dog's Last Will and Testament

(Author unknown)

 

Before humans die, they write their last Will & Testament, and give their home and all they have to those they leave behind. If, with my paws, I could do the same, this is what I'd ask....

 

To a poor and lonely stray I'd give:

 

- My happy home.

- My bowl, cozy bed, soft pillows and all my toys.

- The lap which I loved so much.

- The hand that stroked my fur and the sweet voice which spoke my name.

- I'd will to the sad scared shelter dog the place I had in my human's loving heart, of which there seemed no bounds.

 

So when I die please do not say, "I will never have a pet again, for the loss and pain is more than I can stand."

 

Instead go find an unloved dog; one whose life has held no joy or hope and give MY place to HIM.

 

This is the only thing I can give...

the love I left behind.

 

Awesome! Where is the teary face icon?

 

Jovi

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Oh, my heart breaks for you. I know the bitter loss of such a beloved friend. But please know that you DID do the right thing. I've seen enough of dogs with seizures to know that it *is* to brutally terrible for them. Her quality of life was lost and to let her linger would have caused her suffering. Your choice was the merciful one, painful though it was for you. You gave her the blessing of your love all her long, wonderful days, and then you gave her the blessing of release from suffering. They know when they are losing themselves and they know when you are there to ease them Beyond.

 

Blessings to you and yours.

 

~ Gloria

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I am truly sorry for your loss. Right now, while your loss is new and your grief is raw, it is hard to imagine the pain subsiding. But eventually it will, (to an extent) and when it does, what will remain will be the treasured memories of her 15 wonderful years with you, and not so much, the the tragic day when you said goodbye. She was a beautiful girl, and so lucky to be the recipient of so much love.

 

I think this quote eloquently sums it up:

 

"There is a cycle of love and death that shapes the lives of those who choose to travel in the company of animals. It is a cycle unlike any other. To those who have never lived through its turnings or walked its rocky path, our willingness to give our hearts with full knowledge that they will be broken seems incomprehensible. Only we know how small a price we pay for what we receive; our grief, no matter how powerful it may be, is an insufficient measure of the joy we have been given."

Suzanne Clothier "Bones would Rain from the Sky"

 

 

Thanks, besides the tremendous love Angel had there were many other unique traits that made her so very special, one was that she was so polite, she would ever so softly "woof" on my side of the bed to wake me up while trying not to disturb my wife's sleep :-)

 

You are right about it being hard to imagine the pain ever subsiding, it is tough just getting thru everyday chores, and things that used to be enjoyable now seem empty without her happy face around.

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Jovi's note made me remember this:

 

A Dog's Last Will and Testament

(Author unknown)

 

Before humans die, they write their last Will & Testament, and give their home and all they have to those they leave behind. If, with my paws, I could do the same, this is what I'd ask....

 

To a poor and lonely stray I'd give:

 

- My happy home.

- My bowl, cozy bed, soft pillows and all my toys.

- The lap which I loved so much.

- The hand that stroked my fur and the sweet voice which spoke my name.

- I'd will to the sad scared shelter dog the place I had in my human's loving heart, of which there seemed no bounds.

 

So when I die please do not say, "I will never have a pet again, for the loss and pain is more than I can stand."

 

Instead go find an unloved dog; one whose life has held no joy or hope and give MY place to HIM.

 

This is the only thing I can give...

the love I left behind.

 

Thanks, I saw that recently, but it is good to see it again. It is easy to have mixed emotions about getting another dog, it's easy to feel like you're betraying them, but life just does not feel right, like there is a void that desperately needs filled.

 

That message makes sense as I would have to believe that with as much love as Angel had for everyone, including other animals, that she would want my wife and I to share that same unselfish love with another dog needing a loving home.

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Oh, my heart breaks for you. I know the bitter loss of such a beloved friend. But please know that you DID do the right thing. I've seen enough of dogs with seizures to know that it *is* to brutally terrible for them. Her quality of life was lost and to let her linger would have caused her suffering. Your choice was the merciful one, painful though it was for you. You gave her the blessing of your love all her long, wonderful days, and then you gave her the blessing of release from suffering. They know when they are losing themselves and they know when you are there to ease them Beyond.

 

Blessings to you and yours.

 

~ Gloria

 

Thanks for your kind words, my mind understands what you are saying, but my heart did not want to give up hope and you get that nagging feeling wondering if there was some cure the vet overlooked or didn't consider, and if only we had held out longer perhaps something would have been thought of that was originally overlooked.

 

IF the severe cluster seizures had stopped and we were given any real hope by the vet it would have been easier to hold off for at least for few days to make absolutely sure if anything could be done, but the seizures were severe and showed no sign of stopping and were recurring about every 45 minutes and they already stopped her ability to even stand up or drink inbetween having seizures, and her breathing was very heavy between seizures so even between seizures she was having a rough time, and the vet did not offer any real hope, but said that PB meds "might" slightly diminish the intensity of the seizures (and they were severe seizures) but would not stop them, and that going by her age and present condition that it was very likely a brain tumor and she would likely only survive from weeks to a month or two and it would be miserable for her, the vet said it was the humane thing to do to not allow her to keep suffering.

 

It was a gut-wrenching decesion I desperately did not want to make, but when the vet offers no real hope what else could I do ?

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I am also so sorry to hear about Angel. I think you made the right decision at the right time - as hard as it was.

 

I am glad to hear that you may get another dog in the future - when the time is right. I truly believe that the best way to honor a dog that has passed is to offer our home to another dog so they can feel your love too.

 

Jovi

 

As very much as we would rather have our precious Angel back and miss her so very much, I guess it might help our sanity to get a new dog sooner than later to fill that void, not that any dog would or could ever take the number one place Angel has in our hearts, but would still be loved as another child.

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It's so hard to see at the time, but yes, you did the kindest thing for your Angel. You were there for her when she needed you, and you did what was best for her. I'm so very sorry for your loss. They're never with us long enough.

 

Run free, Angel.

 

Thanks, I know 15 years is old for a dog and we were blessed to have her that long, but we were so hoping for at least a few more years with her.

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I'm so sorry for your loss of Angel. I have a dear friend who very eloquently said that we make the decision to end their lives "because we love them that much." You loved Angel and it was your love that allowed you to let her go when that was the best thing for her. Go ahead and grieve. In time, you will be better able to remember all the good times and the love you shared with a smile rather than a tear, though the tears will never entirely recede.

 

This one has made the rounds many, many times, but I love it and think it speaks volumes:

 

 

Godpseed Angel; you're living among your namesakes now.

 

J.

 

Thanks, that was a touching video clip, and we believe we will see her again, but in the meantime it seems like the pain will never end, but I know it takes time for the pain to lessen even though we will still miss her till we are with her again.

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I remember when we lost a beloved kitty, the first of either our adult lives, I thought I had never known grief like that before. I was so unprepared for how painful it was. Reading your posts reminds me of that time and I'm very sorry that you've lost your friend. It doesn't make it any easier, but you absolutely made the right decision. Peace on you and your family.

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I think about this often. We lost our first Border Collie, Ralph, 32 years ago. He was a great dog, the best dog we have ever had. We didn’t know how good he was because he was our first Border Collie. We were young and ignorant… if we only knew then what we know now. I still second guess whether we should have put him to sleep. It’s the hardest single decision you will ever make. We brought his body home and buried him in the back yard next to the house by our bedroom wall. We were both crying over his grave that day and agreed that this was just too hard to go through again and it might be a year or more before we could even think about getting another dog. The next night at diner it was quiet, too quiet. Our resolve eased and we discussed getting another dog in a few months when we were finished grieving. I came home from work the next evening to find my wife crying, she was lonely there was a big hole in our hearts and lives. She needed a dog, WE needed a dog. The only way to fill the void was with another dog. And thus began the search for our second Border Collie.

 

I must tell you that I love this breed of dogs. I am a volunteer with All Border Collie Rescue in Texas. Working with the people in our Rescue has been one of the most rewarding experiences in my life. We are in our fourth year as a rescue. We have no building, no kennels, we have approximately 30 volunteers, every one of our dogs is individually fostered. Already this year we have taken almost 300 dogs into our rescue and adopted out over 230. When you are ready and considering your next dog, think about adopting a rescue (Border Collie, of course). There are reputable Border Collie Rescues all over the United States. It’s true what they say, these dogs have a sixth sense, they know when they have been saved and they respond in kind. It is something you will never regret.

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