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I found this dog out in a storm tonight along with a poodle. I don't recognize her as being any of my neighbors. She is very overweight and matted and her feet were bleeding. I have brought both dogs in and will try to find an owner tomorrow. Meanwhile I an trying to decide if she is a border collie or a sheltie. She is shorter and stockier than my border collie, kinda looks like a bc head on a fat sheltie body.

 

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Yes, she was pacing and crying but is sleeping now. The poodle that was with her looks ok but she looks like she has been on a chain, missing hair around her neck where a collar was and her underside and skirt are nothing but mats.

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Her condition is bothering me. I tried to brush her and couldn't get the brush through her fur at all. She could be a recent rescue or an escaped foster or something, I don't know the situation, but I'm not going to feel good about sending these dogs back where they came from. The poodle's condition is ok but he is unneutered. I'm afraid this is the dog I've been hearing bark all night lately, because I haven't heard any barking tonight. :/

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You have a good heart for taking these dogs in and trying to help them. I hope you can find a rescue willing to take them and place them in good homes. Note that I did not say 'I hope you can find their owner' since it appears that the owner was not taking care of them.

 

The head definitely looks BC. I don't think I see any Sheltie in there since I would expect a finer bone structure. She looks overweight.

 

Good Luck,

Jovi

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Maybe a show bred Border Collie?

 

Don't judge until you have the whole story. Maybe they have been lost for a long time and have loving owners who have been looking for them for weeks or months.

 

Some years ago I helped my mom and sister move. My sister's cat escaped and ran away, terrified by all the changes in the household. It took us more than a month to catch him. He would not go into the humane traps to eat the food. We only managed to grab him because he became so sick while hiding near his old home that he no longer had the strength to run away. He had lost half his body weight and gone into kidney failure. When we showed up at the emergency veterinary hospital with an emaciated, half dead cat it would have been easy for them to jump to conclusions and think we had been neglecting him.

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Well, I went to the house with the barking dog but they are not theirs. Went to my vet, the border collie has a microchip but it isn't registered and the local shelter is closed on Mondays. My husband is going to make some signs at work, I don't have a printer, but I made a craigslist "found" ad.

 

The poodle is really nice if slightly annoying but the bc is a little snarky with my dogs. Not sure how much discomfort she may be in with the mats though.

 

I foster cats for a rescue organization in Atlanta and if I need to I can adopt these out through the org. Still thinking about taking them to the shelter though and just having them call me to come get them if no one claims or adopts them, if they will do that.

 

Here's a couple more pics...

 

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And the poodle...

 

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That is so kind of you to take them in! Chances are they do live outside chained or penned. But, you never know. As others have said, they may have been missing for a while or they could have gone missing and then found by someone who decided to chain them. It is too bad people do not register their information on their microchip.

 

Just two weeks ago I picked up a husky just like your border collie-fat, coat was terrible and was clearly an outside dog. I drove around and found out that he lives cabled to a garage and sometimes put into a pen at night with a dog house. :unsure: I felt terrible hooking him up to the garage but the owner called and was so nice and thankful. :blink: What broke my heart even more, was the super old husky that was also cabled to the garage.

I also once found a dog that the owners didn't want back... :angry: So sometimes I assume the worst and would love to see the two you found placed into rescue so they can find good homes!

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Just two weeks ago I picked up a husky just like your border collie-fat, coat was terrible and was clearly an outside dog. I drove around and found out that he lives cabled to a garage and sometimes put into a pen at night with a dog house. :unsure: I felt terrible hooking him up to the garage but the owner called and was so nice and thankful. :blink: What broke my heart even more, was the super old husky that was also cabled to the garage.

 

I don't like to see dogs chained out and never thought I'd be one to do it... BUT our beagle is an escape artist and her favourite place to sit is on the yellow line in the middle of the road. Several times she has nearly been killed when she has escaped and gone to sit on the road. So now, when she is outside, she is chained. She is my only dog who is ever chained, and I hate to do it - I'm sure we get judged for it by folks driving by, but I'd rather my kids' dog be alive for them to snuggle with in the evening. (She's not a fat dog and has a beautiful, well-kept coat ;) )

 

This is my way of saying, you never really know the full story. A dog tied out to a building isn't necessarily a neglected dog!

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I don't like to see dogs chained out and never thought I'd be one to do it... BUT our beagle is an escape artist and her favourite place to sit is on the yellow line in the middle of the road. Several times she has nearly been killed when she has escaped and gone to sit on the road. So now, when she is outside, she is chained. She is my only dog who is ever chained, and I hate to do it - I'm sure we get judged for it by folks driving by, but I'd rather my kids' dog be alive for them to snuggle with in the evening. (She's not a fat dog and has a beautiful, well-kept coat ;) )

 

This is my way of saying, you never really know the full story. A dog tied out to a building isn't necessarily a neglected dog!

I don't have any issue with what you do-tieing a dog outside for a period of time. But, the dogs I found live 24/7 like that...except for when they are put in a pen (whats the difference?). I don't agree with 24/7 isolation, outside in all kinds of weather and they are typically not fed or watered everyday, are typically never vetted at all and are allowed to get heartworm and reproduce. I drive by a dog near me who lives chained to a tree with a heavy logging chain-he is out there in the heavy rains and winds we had yesterday, sits out in the snow...I think you get the idea. Don't feel bad for what you do! There is nothing wrong with that. Up until a few years ago I had no idea that so many people chained and penned their dogs 24/7 for their entire lives. I live near a reservation and there are dogs chained to nothing more than a wood box(many houses have several dogs, they look like lawn ornaments), when you get up close to these dogs (and most dogs that live that way) they are clearly neglected and suffering from isolation-thin, matted, territorial, dieing for affection, fleas, etc). No dog should live that way but in many parts of our country this is normal (I was shocked at the #'s I saw in NC when visiting).

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NC is probably famous for that, and for dogs in pens on the back corner of the property. I've always wondered what the point was in having a "pet" if it was left out in a pen in the back (or tied) and ignored.

 

J.

I ask myself that all the time. I have talked to some owners of dogs who have various reasons-dog got too big, kids allergic, protection (the dog is chained so it isn't protecting anything but itself), couldn't housebreak, no $ for a fence, that's just the way they were raised to own dogs, etc. Most reasons though end with me thinking "but why not rehome the dog to someone who can provide what it needs"? A lot of times these people love their dogs very much even though they spend no time, money or effort on them. It's delusional to me.

A lot of times too, dogs that attack kids were chained at the time of the attack. That is part of why many towns/counties have started passing legislation on what is legal as far as chaining/penning. The issues are not black/white all the time though and laws are hard to enforce and don't always target the people who are actually neglecting their dogs. It's an issue I find myself to be passionate about and most of the time education and help goes farther than laws.

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In NC, there is a group, The Coalition to Unchain Dogs, that builds fences for people who can't afford to do so, so that their dogs can be let off of chains. It seems to be a great group of volunteers who are freeing a lot of dogs from their chains around the state (and helping owners with the cost of neutering too). So all is not bad!

 

FWIW, I had to keep one of my LGDs chained until I could come up with a solution for her escaping the pasture fences. To me, the chain was a better option than her being hit and maimed or killed crossing the road, or worse, causing an accident that hurt or killed a person. Had I not been able to come up with a workable solution for her, I would have tried to find a rescue to take her and place her in a pet situation where she wouldn't have an opportunity to go under fences to roam and expand her territory. But I don't think the OP is way off base in thinking the dogs are not the best cared for, and although there are good reasons to chain dogs, more often than not such dogs are treated as out of sight, out of mind for most of the time, and that's just sad. I see nothing wrong with a housedog being put out on a runner where there is no fence or there's a need to prevent the dog escaping, but presumably such dogs spend time indoors with their humans, too, and that makes all the difference.

 

J.

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In Durham, NC, it is no longer legal to have a dog on a chain, a rope, or a run line unless the owner is out there with the dog. Thanks to PETA and that "unchained" group. However, it's legal to keep the dog all the time in a 4x4 pen at the back of the yard. I honestly don't see the difference.

 

I could see putting Dixie in a pen for the same times I put her in a crate - when I'm home. And I could see putting her on a run-line at those same times. I surely wouldn't keep her on either. And I wouldn't have her in either situation if I were not home.

 

To me, it's not necessarily how but how often and for how long you put a dog out alone that matters.

 

A 6'-high, 2'-deep fence (Dix jumps and digs quite well) around our acre would be great. First, can't figure out how to do that and keep all the trees; second, can't figure out how to then still have the visiting deer, red and grey fox, possums, raccoons, feral cats...; third, can't afford it anyhow.

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Good for you for taking these guys in. I don't think I'd take them to the shelter though. I don't know about shelters where you are, but here, disease is rampant and the dogs are overcrowded and stressed. I made the mistake of delaying a couple of rescue pulls once, because of holidays, and nearly lost one of them. Spent a long time giving antibiotics and cooking chicken and rice to nurse her back to health.

 

When my last foundling showed up a year and a half ago, I called all the shelters. I told them the breed of dog I'd found (but not sex or other description), left my number, and told them to have anyone who came in or called about a lost Brittany to contact me. I'd planned to have any callers fill in the blank information to prove they were the owner. Nobody ever called, though. So now the collies have their own little bird dog. :D

 

I think the dog you found is definitely a border collie. It's amazing how fat the poor things can get if not properly managed.

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theshine,

what is the latest on these dogs?

 

Sally's post reminded me that one should always check how the shelter views the status of dogs that are brought to them. Here (VA), if a dog or cat is collected as a stray by an Animal Control Officer, by law, the shelter must hold them for 7 days (maybe 5 days? not sure) before euthanizing. [some shelters euthanize on the day the hold is up, whereas other shelters may give the animal more time depending on how full the kennels are.] If an animal is turned in by its owner, the shelter is within its legal rights to immediately euthanize it. The surprising thing I learned is that if someone finds a dog/cat and turns it into the shelter, it can also be euthanized immediately. So even though the animal is a stray and you found it, the animal is considered to be an owner turn-in and treated accordingly.

 

Note: these guidelines are for public animal control facilities. Not for profit shelters usually do not follow these guidelines.

 

Jovi

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If an animal is turned in by its owner, the shelter is within its legal rights to immediately euthanize it. The surprising thing I learned is that if someone finds a dog/cat and turns it into the shelter, it can also be euthanized immediately. So even though the animal is a stray and you found it, the animal is considered to be an owner turn-in and treated accordingly.

 

Probably the reason for that rule is that so many owners will claim the animal is a stray when turning it in. :( When I used to pull from shelters for a rescue, the workers (metaphorically) rolled their eyes when people brought in "strays" - often, it seemed the poor dog knew the people surrendering it awfully well.

 

Although at least the people turning their dog in to the shelter weren't dumping it out in the country someplace. Like the guys who used to own my (gun-shy) Brittany. Or the people who dumped a whole freakin' litter of six week old pit bull puppies on the side of the road last week, a couple of miles from my farm. :angry:

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Sorry for the delay in updating. I reluctantly returned the dogs to their owner this after noon. The vets office where I had them scanned called me and said a lady was there looking for her dogs. She had a flyer she had printed with their picture on it. I loaded them up and met her at the vets office. She seemed like a nice lady, she was crying and hugged me, and seems to have gone to a bit of trouble to find them...inconsistent with the level of care they were recieving. The lady lives in my neighborhood but several streets away, the bc lives outside in her fenced yard and is 9 years old. She said she escapes "whenever she can" and "has always been a handful". My husband seems to think I shouldn't have returned them, but it's a tough situation. I told her I was familiar with the breed if she ever needed any help or didn't want the dog anymore.

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Some people simply don't know what dogs need. They treat their dogs the way their parents did. It doesn't mean they don't love them. They are simply ignorant of what is considered "basic care" nowadays.

 

And that, of course, is viewed differently by different people. A fat dog is unhealthy. But to some people food equals love - or they just can't comprehend that a dog that gazes pleadingly at you while you eat your dinner isn't really hungry.

 

It's sad about those dogs, but it does seem that their owner cares about them. She just doesn't care for them in the way that more educated dog owners would consider basic.

 

I think you did the right thing - hard though it may have been.

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My husband seems to think I shouldn't have returned them, but it's a tough situation. I told her I was familiar with the breed if she ever needed any help or didn't want the dog anymore.

 

You did the right thing, although I know it was hard. If someone had turned up to collect my little Brittany, I'd have had a real tough time returning him given his issues. And I once had to sit on my hands to keep from stealing a BC pup who was chained outside 24/7 in August with only a junk car for shelter. (The people finally agreed to sell him to me but turns out they were just buying time so they could move him elsewhere. *sigh*) Hard as it is, one just can't go around stealing other people's property.

 

Anyway, now the owner probably trusts you, since you returned the dogs to her. Maybe she will contact you for help or even re-homing, if the bc is one of those dogs that lives outside because her people just gave up on teaching her how to be a good companion. Maybe you can even find a way to keep in touch?

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My husband seems to think I shouldn't have returned them, but it's a tough situation. I told her I was familiar with the breed if she ever needed any help or didn't want the dog anymore.

I too think you did the right thing. When I returned the husky to his cable I left a note with my # saying what a sweet boy he was and how I would be willing to take him if she couldn't care for him in the future. I wanted to reach out but not sound judgmental since a lot of people see nothing wrong with banishing the dog to a cable 24/7. I have also in the past offered to walk, groom, or bring straw for outside dogs. Sometimes building that relationship in a positive way can eventually get the dog out of the situation. Besides, most people would just replace the lost dog with another. Education is so important.

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