Jump to content
BC Boards

Tried NSAID, tried Cosequin, tried Adequan injections - help!


Recommended Posts

Nothing has seemed to work out for our dog Tate. He was diagnosed with hip dysplasia by our vet after getting x-rays as I've posted on here before. First we were prescribed a NSAID that I can't recall the name of at the moment and also tried Cosequin + Fish oil capsules which I can't tell if they are working or not. We decided to try the Adequan route and were very pleased with the initial success - he seemed like a brand new dog during the loading dose phases but once he was transitioned to once a month you could tell he was back to discomfort.

 

What's next? He's 6 or so and we just don't want him to be in pain - has anyone tried other alternatives?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to hear you're struggling to find something to help Tate--I know how frustrating that can be!

 

Although not for hip dysplasia, I found acupuncture very helpful for our Ody when his arthritis was no longer manageable with other treatments. Specifically, my vet practices aqua-puncture, but I would readily try "regular" acupuncture, too, if that were what was available. With acupuncture, we were able to wean him off the pain meds, and he seemed generally healthier in addition to being more mobile. (He was already 14, I think, when we began.)

 

My vet does not really advertise that she provides this treatment because she sees it as something she can offer to her existing clients when they need it--not a way she wants to draw new clients into the practice. So it is possible someone in your community is also trained in acupuncture but doesn't emphasize it.

 

Best wishes finding something for Tate.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to hear you're struggling to find something to help Tate--I know how frustrating that can be!

 

Although not for hip dysplasia, I found acupuncture very helpful for our Ody when his arthritis was no longer manageable with other treatments. Specifically, my vet practices aqua-puncture, but I would readily try "regular" acupuncture, too, if that were what was available. With acupuncture, we were able to wean him off the pain meds, and he seemed generally healthier in addition to being more mobile. (He was already 14, I think, when we began.)

 

My vet does not really advertise that she provides this treatment because she sees it as something she can offer to her existing clients when they need it--not a way she wants to draw new clients into the practice. So it is possible someone in your community is also trained in acupuncture but doesn't emphasize it.

 

Best wishes finding something for Tate.

 

Thanks for the suggestion - I will look into seeing if anyone offers acupuncture therapy near us and give it a try.

Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point, once you have tried the non-surgical treatments, do you consider surgery? I guess it would depend on the cost, how deep your wallet is and whether or not the vet thinks it would help Tate.

 

I hope that you can find something to make Tate more comfortable.

 

Jovi

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had varying success with MSM supplements for my horses over the years. It has anti-inflammatory properties and is available for dogs as well. It may be worth a try for a few weeks. The adequan/cosequin are joint lubes which are helpful, but won't address the inflammation per se.

 

http://www.yourdoghealth.com/dog_msm.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is someone I know whose dog has HD on both sides, and she chose to not have surgery done. One thing that she is doing, with her vet's or therapist's supervision, is making sure the dog is fit because in some cases, building muscle and strength can result in the muscles helping to stabilize the joint to reduce movement, pain, and arthritic changes.

 

Have you tried a certified canine rehab therapist for a program of physical therapy? It might be helpful if you have not yet tried this approach.

 

Very best wishes!

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are lots of different NSAIDS and pain meds out there. It's possible that the one(s) you tried just weren't suitable for Tate. I'd probably keep looking at NSAIDS and pain killers, also try acupuncture, MSM, and help build stabilizing muscle with swim therapy if the vet (do you have a rehab/sports vet in the area?) says it's okay to use. Also perhaps discuss with your vet whether it's suitable to give Adequan more often or to combine it with some other joint therapy. With pain things I think you just have to keep trying until you find something that works.

 

J.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree with what has been posted above, and I'll add that it is OK to give Adequan twice monthly. Polyglycan is another product that may be of some help, as well. However, if the HD is so severe and there is no remaining cartilage, your chances for success with these types of supplements will be greatly reduced.

 

Holistic colleagues recommend adding tumeric to the food in arthritic pets.

 

Pain meds and supplements can only go so far. It would be really helpful to build up the supporting muscles of the hind end as Julie and Sue recommended. There are so many good exercises for doing this that I feel like going to a vet who understands physical rehabilitation would be very worth your while.

 

I am a big fan of therapeutic lasers and think that this could be very useful for your dog. And, the owner of my practice is certified in acupuncture. She has helped many painful conditions in dogs, cats, horses, and even cows.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did NSAIDS, glucosamine supplements and all kinds of hind end strengthening exercises over the years with Carlie when she was diagnosed with HD at 2 years of age. She did great up until age 7 when it just wasn't enough any more. I decided on bilateral FHOs with her and was glad I did it before her hind end muscles had started to atrophy because with them still being strong and holding her bones together she recovered very quickly and easily. She was actually standing in her cage to greet me when I went to pick her up at the vets and she was back in the ring competing in agility 6 months later after physical therapy.

 

She is 12.5 years old now and still works sheep regularly and loves to fetch her frisbee and take long walks. She can no longer jump into the back of the SUV and going up steep flights of stairs is getting harder but, hey, she's no spring chicken any more, regardless of her lack of hips! I would do the surgery for her again in a heartbeat. It took away all her pain in one surgery and my heart used to break watching a young 6 year old trying to get up from lying down and not being able to work her sheep for the pain.

 

Just my experience. If it's a thought I wouldn't let the hips get too bad before considering surgery. Don't let the muscles atrophy. I've seen dogs have the surgery after they quit being able to be active and they never quite recover or it's a much longer and harder recovery.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You might look into nimble supreme, it has all the ingredients as cosequin however it also has hyaluronic acid in it. which way be beneficial and its about the same cost if I am not mistaken. I have my dog, Diesel, on nimble supreme since he broke his leg recently. So sorry to hear about the HD with your dog :( please keep us updated

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...