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Okay, so I went and checked this little guy out. He is shy, but not so bad. He came up to me right away, and enjoyed getting pets. He does roll on his back and act afraid/submissive, but he will come up to you with his tail wagging. He hasn't lived in a home before, so he will need some house training. Otherwise, he let me touch his feet and look at his teeth with no issues or pulling away. He was quiet the whole time, and pretty mellow for a 5-6 month old BC. I expect he will get more bouncy as time goes on, but he doesn't strike me as a noisy destruct-o dog. In the right hands I think he will probably remain devoid of behavioral issues, other than being a bit shy. Since he comes up to strangers to be pet, albeit nervously, I think socialization really wouldn't be too hard.

 

One sad thing I noticed while I was in the shelter... They have at least 3 other BCs that aren't listed online. I'm starting to think that Idaho could really use its own BC rescue. You can get a BC off a working ranch for 25-75 bucks here, and accidental litters are common. They can make really nice dogs (or really awful pets); the ranch pups are usually pretty healthy and hard working. BUT....they are a dime a dozen, and we see so many tossed away in shelters or that come up as strays.

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"Do not bring your dog to the pound thinking you'll be able to get him/her into rescue faster. Unfortunately, more than 90% of the dogs we're contacted about in the pounds are euthanized because we just don't have room. Idaho and Oregon have far more BC's in the shelters than WA. Go to http://www.petfinder.org to check out the statistics yourself. If you do drop off your dog at a shelter due to dire circumstances, please notify the rescuers in your area by clicking here. There is no guarantee we will be able to help, but we will try."

 

Looks like they cater more to people who own the dog, but I will contact the Idaho rep.

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Well it can't hurt to try. It's not as if it's *you* turning in a dog to teh pound hoping a rescue will step in. You're just trying to help one....

 

J.

 

I got in contact with this rescue and they're looking into it. I also gave them some info on other BCs in our shelter.

 

Buster: Buster Buster is 10 years old, and his adoption fee is half off. He was a stray found in Lava Hot Springs, ID and enjoys ball, frisbee, etc. He also likes playing with the hose. His tail is not docked and he's a typical black/wht BC. Was friendly with me through the cage at the shelter. Very bright face, and attentive.

 

Shylo: Shylo See the attached picture for body type and other markings ( I know its not a good picture...) He has his tail, and is black/wht with some blue ticking/spotting. This dog is friendly, but shy. Nothing a few positive encounters in the real world can't fix. He was a stray found with a few other dogs. Shylo is about 6 months old, quiet, and mellow for a BC pup. I played with this dog in the yard, and he showed no signs of aggression or pulling away when having his feet manipulated, and teeth checked out. He has never been in a home, and will need house training. He is good with other dogs.

 

 

Lucy: Lucy is a female puppy with a wirehair face, so she's a mix. She is very friendly, quiet, and seems to have a very nice disposition. She has been at the shelter the longest, and one of the staff asked me to add her on the email. Despite the wirehair face, she sure acted like a BC pup... I have seen some wirehair BC mixes pop up in central Idaho; seems to be a theme.

 

Unknown: See attached picture. This is a little male BC, blck/wht with tail and prick ears: 1-2 years old. He was friendly to me through the cage, but I could not meet him because he will not be up for adoption until tomorrow 6/9/2012. Not much is known about this dog.

 

 

Magic: Magic This dog looks like he's probably a mix, but enough BC to make me look twice. They have him listed as a flat-coated retriever. He is 2 years old, was picked up as a stray, and they feel as though he has some dog aggression issues, but I didn't ask how bad. On his card it was listed that he knows some commands, and he was friendly through the kennel door.

post-11563-057208700 1339184235_thumb.jpg

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Update: Boise rescue contact is looking for some fosters, and I might be driving a few of these guys to Boise with some luck.

 

How come all the bios mention that the dogs "still have their tails"...is it common where you live to have Border Collie tails docked?

 

BTW, "unknown" looks adorable...wish I didn't live so far.

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It is acually, and one of the rescuers specificially wanted that information. Its more common in rural areas. When I bought Rocket the breeder said, " I was going to get their tails docked, but I just didnt have the heart." Im glad he didnt. The BCs here with docked tailed often get listed as ozzies or heeler mixes at shelters here.

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How come all the bios mention that the dogs "still have their tails"...is it common where you live to have Border Collie tails docked?

I think that docked tails are common in some cultural areas - certainly prevents a dog from getting a tail full of burrs or a tail caught jumping a fence or gate. And I say "cultural" because sometimes things that were practical or seemed justified at one point in time or in certain circumstances, can become the norm in an area even if no longer valid (or valid in a wide-spread manner).

 

Aussies can come with natural bobtails (which can be accompanied by spinal issues that may seem relatively unimportant in a younger animal) or tails of short, medium, or full length. Some breeders dock them all because, to them, "Aussie" and "docked tail" are synonymous, even in areas where burrs and chance of catching their tail and hurting themselves are minimal or an inconvenience at most.

 

I think that, since it is obvious that a dog uses its tail for balance (I call it the "rudder"), that a tail should not be docked without an over-ridingly good reason. See the below photo for an example of a tail being used in this way (photo by and courtesy of Michelle Dobbs) -

 

CSC_0812.jpg

In addition, the tail is part of the dog's expressive body language, and I think should be left on for this purpose, as well. JMO.

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I have just never heard of anyone intentionally docking a Border Collie's tail. I know Aussie's typically have them done and other breeds for "aesthetic" reasons but never knew of anyone doing it to BC's. Just wondered if out West it was common. I can only imagine how much more I would be asked "is he an australian shepherd" if my boy didn't have a tail. :D

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Meg is originally from southern Idaho and she has a docked tail. I am frequently asked if she is an Aussie. She is definitely Border Collie, could possibly be part Aussie, though two long time Border Collie enthusiasts/owners/trainers who have seen her many times think she is all Border Collie.

 

I hope all the pups in Pocatello find a good home or at least foster homes. Lucy is adorable!

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  • 2 weeks later...

http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/23181930

 

So, I am thinking of asking my landlord if I can adopt this one. My landlord is exceptionally dog friendly, though there's always a chance he could say no. In the event that he says, "yes" I am trying to weigh the pros and cons of getting another dog...

 

Pros:

 

He has an awesome temperament

He is young; so he would have many years of sheep herding, agility, and obedience ahead of him

I really like him for some inexplicable reason

He needs a home

While in school I work a lot, but I have a flexible schedule and can often work from home.

 

Cons:

 

I'm a poor student, what if any of my pets get sick? I work at a vet office...so its cheaper and they will work with me...BUT it makes me uncomfortable not to have the emergency funds on hand. Maybe get pet insurance?

 

I will eventually need to move. Rocket would be coming with me anyway, would it be harder to move with 2 dogs than 1? By the time I need to move the puppy will have his CGC barring some behavioral disaster. I will not leave my dogs behind so I can move to a new job; I love Rocket and I have invested way to much time, money, and energy to leave her. If I had a second dog; I think I would feel the same way.

 

 

I'm trying to weigh this out in my head, and Ive been thinking on it for a couple weeks now. Is letting the dog rot in the shelter worse than bringing him home and risking vet bills I cannot afford?

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If you're not sure you can provide for all his needs it might be best to help him but not adopt him. You could look into sponsoring him, continue to promote him like you've done here, and visit him at the shelter to walk and do a little training.

 

Then again, not many of us have money on hand to cover every possible emergency. If you can afford basic expenses and routine vet visits (whatever you consider necessary), there are credit options for emergencies as long as you are willing to go in debt to see that proper care is given. So that just leaves whether or not you have to time to train and care for a second dog which is something only you can decide.

 

I don't think moving with two dogs is any harder than moving with one. Its mostly just a matter of searching and waiting for the right place.

 

Either way, I'm sure he's better off having you on his side. If the landlord says ok, you could try fostering him and see how it goes.

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Sounds like you would be an ideal candidate for a "foster to adopt" program. Many rescues have this kind of program, if not, it couldn’t hurt to talk to them about it. You rescue and foster the dog through one of your local BC rescue organization. Most shelters will give the dog to a legitimate rescue group (no adoption fees). The rescue will pay vetting fees and you supply the food, love, behavioral training, etc. The rescue will advertise the dog on their website to find the dog a forever home. If, in the meantime, you decide to keep the dog, you reimburse the rescue for expenses. Bottom line is: the dog gets saved. The rescue I am affiliated with (All Border Collie Rescue) has this and it works. I would definitely check with Pacifica Northwest Border Collie Rescue or Western Border Collie Rescue about this kind of program.

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