Jump to content
BC Boards

Leash lunging, barking, and hackles


Recommended Posts

We were traveling and crating Molly in the van, she did get a mile walk in but more rest with the long drive. At a park- two dogs unleashed came quickly to see Molly on the leash. A small Brittany spaniel and large black lab - came nose to nose with Molly- her Hackles were raised and she started to growl and bark. The Brittany lunged at her.

 

I notice this behavior more on the leash then off.

 

We removed the Brittany. Let Molly off leash to run a bit. The lab and Molly played nicely. Apparently the Brittany is a bit harder to socialize.

 

What would you do if you encounter two dogs while yours is on a leash?

 

The dogs went nose to nose instead of sniffing back ends- :unsure::blink:

 

Ways safely stop aggressive behavior.

 

 

 

ps. I knew both dogs, the lab is generally mellow, the Brittany is more a people dog than socializing dog.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This can be a tough situation with any dog. Two strange dogs charging at you when you have no means of escape is scary for anyone and that's likely how your dog viewed the situation. I think your dog responded in a completely normal manner and I wouldn't worry about it too much. I don't know how much time you had to react, but I probably would have quickly put her back in the van until you had better control over the situation.

 

Here's what I typically do with my dogs when dogs come running at us.

 

Bear has been attacked while on leash and can be a bully towards other dogs in any situation (especially male dogs). With him its best to just get out of there as quickly as possible. Not running of course, but just moving away from the other dogs so he feels a bit more comfortable. If the dogs come up behind him to sniff as we retreat, at least they're not head on where they're likely to have conflict. We just keep moving forward and do our best to ignore the persistent followers (though most dogs take the hint and leave us alone).

 

Meg has some leash issues. She has greatly improved over the past two years, but we're still working on it. She does well off leash with other dogs but on leash she goes on the defensive when other dogs approach in any manner. In situations like you described, I think its a perfectly normal response. The other dog(s) should not be running at her and I don't think its fair to expect her to be ok with that. Mostly she just wants the other dogs to back away and slow down so she can decide if she likes them and wants to meet them or not. With Meg, I help her out by putting her behind me so I'm between the other dog(s) and her. This usually slows the other dogs down so they approach more cautiously. Sometimes body blocking and moving towards the approaching dog to get them to back off is necessary. Then if a meet and greet is appropriate, I'll drop the leash and let her say hello. If not, we walk away, with me staying between her and the other dog.

 

Uneducated dog owners will almost always blame your 'aggressive' dog for anything that happens, but the fact is they were wrong for letting their dogs charge up to you and your dog.

 

In a few cases where I knew the dog and the other dog's owner, I've just dropped the leash while the other dog was approaching so Meg could feel she had an escape and couldhandle it on her own. She did really well and it helped her confidence on leash, but I would only do that if you know that the other dog has good intentions and its safe to do so.

 

One time, Meg was really freaking out and flying all over like a nut, scratching up my arms as she jumped. I'm have no idea what she was thinking, but the dog that was approaching looked to be only 6-7 months old and clearly just wanted to play so I just grabbed Meg's head and made her let the other dog sniff her bottom. After that she immediately calmed down and was fine. They played for a few minutes (Meg still on leash because we were in the street) until the puppy's owner realized he had wandered off and came to get him. Again, not something I'd do all the time, but in that situation it worked and both dogs were happy when we parted.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rodeo got attacked once during a walk. The dog snuck past the owner as she was opening the front door, trotted up to him, fastened on to the fur on Rodeo's neck, and started shaking as violently as it could.

 

Nothing I could do helped, but someone came along and splashed the dog with water, and it released immediately.

 

So if you're concerned about future dog attacks, a plastic water bottle might be a useful thing to carry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You say you knew the dogs, so if it were me, I would have dropped my leash immediately when I saw them running. This way your dog doesn't feel cornered or like she can't get away. Even still, imagine if you had two big humans running full speed at you? It's still rude behavior on the other dogs part and sometimes a 'correction' from your dog is warranted as long as it isn't over the top. IMO anyways.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It would take me some time to dig up the study, but there is some scientific evidence out there that dogs show more aggression on leash than off. Might be worth a try dropping the leash if you know the dogs, as was mentioned before.

 

If a dog is clearly running up in an aggressive, or overbearing, way when I have Rocket on leash I try to chase the other dog off myself. I look them dead in the eye and use a low stern voice and say "no" or "go on" and point away. Typically, stray (or hyper) dogs decide its worth it to give me a wide berth. Maybe they aren't all used to assertive strange humans?

Link to post
Share on other sites

It would take me some time to dig up the study, but there is some scientific evidence out there that dogs show more aggression on leash than off. Might be worth a try dropping the leash if you know the dogs, as was mentioned before.

 

If a dog is clearly running up in an aggressive, or overbearing, way when I have Rocket on leash I try to chase the other dog off myself. I look them dead in the eye and use a low stern voice and say "no" or "go on" and point away. Typically, stray (or hyper) dogs decide its worth it to give me a wide berth. Maybe they aren't all used to assertive strange humans?

 

 

I kinda froze too, I guess my immediate reaction was slow. I would of dropped the leash if it was the soft one but it was the bulky retractable one and it scares Molly if its dropped.

 

Good ideas on the commands I will try to remember that. The owner of the dogs was running slightly behind. I just said Molly is friendly but is more fearful on the leash when meeting new dogs.

 

After the leash was off she played with the lab and even was a bit submissive going under the labs chin and looking up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just googled leash aggression, not sure if I post links, but found some good articles on it.

B)

Molly has some ball obsession here. I wonder if she is thinking "Ball" Ball" oh throw the ball already!

 

thanks for the good input on leash aggression.

Link to post
Share on other sites

HIking and again leash frustration, we tried some different methods to see what worked best.

 

If I had Molly and she was leading she tended to be more growly and unsure of passing by hikers.

 

If my daughter or husband led and Molly was in the middle - we had no issues at all. Also tried having her sit and casually talking to strangers in friendly way.

 

I guess she is trying to decide who is a wolf or a sheep...friend or foe. If she saw that people were interacting with us immediately responded with a calm friendly manner.

 

One young couple loved her so much they must of spent a good 15 minutes petting her.

 

If she leads she must feel responsible or protective. After 2 hours into the hike she could lead or not, no issues. Increased confidence or less anxiety due to a long walk....I am not a dog guru but I can be observant enough to see if it works.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Doggers,

 

 

My dogs are almost always off leash except when it's enforceably illegal. At trials, it's rude to let your dogs pester other off leash dogs - a quick sniff n' snark's okay but no more. It is expected that you can call your dog away from a bitch in season and if he persists you can't complain when the bitch's owner uses the boot or stick.

 

Sheepdoggers don't pet one another's dogs. I have never touched many dogs I've admired for years.Why on earth would I want to?

 

The flexilead is an excellent tool to teach your dog to lunge on a lead. Since it sometimes snaps when the dog lunges, it may also provide a shortcut to the Rainbow Bridge.

 

Donald McCaig

Link to post
Share on other sites
After 2 hours into the hike she could lead or not, no issues.

 

A tired dog is a happy dog. ;)

 

I find that most of Meg's issues while on leash occurs at the start of our walk too...when she's still full of energy and excitement. Playing Frisbee for 5-10 minutes prior to our walk helps a lot (though my friends/neighbors find it amusing that I have to tire her out before we can 'exercise'...lol).

 

I don't let strangers pet Meg. They can give her a treat, but she usually prefers not to be touched by people she doesn't know (me too :P ).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

A tired dog is a happy dog. ;)

 

I find that most of Meg's issues while on leash occurs at the start of our walk too...when she's still full of energy and excitement. Playing Frisbee for 5-10 minutes prior to our walk helps a lot (though my friends/neighbors find it amusing that I have to tire her out before we can 'exercise'...lol).

 

I don't let strangers pet Meg. They can give her a treat, but she usually prefers not to be touched by people she doesn't know (me too :P ).

 

it takes a bit of effort to tire out a BC.

 

I have tried the frisbee too and she started catching them on the fly. Playing fetch with a chuck it for extra long throw is another great method for tiring Molly. I love my bC but she has way more energy then I do.

 

We went camping and she did quite well on the leash, although some of our hikes are steep and for some of the hikes with climbing that she was off leash for the steeper grade for everyone 's safety. She learned to swim this past week, my BC loves water. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

I kinda froze too, I guess my immediate reaction was slow. I would of dropped the leash if it was the soft one but it was the bulky retractable one and it scares Molly if its dropped.

 

 

This is but one of the many reasons I detest retractable leashes. When dropped, it scuttles after the dog or pops and hits them. I also can't stand waiting in line at the vet while an owner checks in and their dog is stretched out on the stretchy leash, up in my dog's face, even though I am waiting several feet away. Or, worse yet, a child is holding the leash and can't understand how to brake and retract the leash to a safer distance.

 

I would never use one where I needed good control over my dog. I threw DH's in the trash can (the one he likes to walk the dog with---I don't use a stretchy leash on my husband :lol: ). There are so many nice nylon or leather leashes on the market. For sheer sturdiness, you can't beat Lupine and their excellent replacement guarantee. I also like my soft German traffic leash for comfort and handy hooks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...