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Low residue diet: what to feed


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We have been managing Brody's Megacolon through stool softeners, enemas and diet, it is the diet that I am trying to figure out. We left the vets with cans of low residue dog food but I would like to figure out something better, he is still a high energy border collie and is hungry all the time, which is leading him to scavengering all sorts of bad things, a habit he has never had.

 

Despite spending hours with google, I really can not figure out what goes into a low residue dog diet and without knowing what goes in I can not attempt to replicate it!

 

Does anyone have any ideas?

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Low residue human food is no fibrous stuff like veggies or beans, basically protein and starch... (DH recently experienced his first colonoscopy so I knew that offhand). So something with a cooked low fiber starch like potato and meat?

 

Whats listed on the dog food ingredient list you are feeding now?

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The prescription food has gone through a process in which the proteins are broken down so tiny that the dog's body can't react to them. You will not be able to replicate a true low res diet at home.

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I work closely with dietitians and help human patients choose the best meal options based on their prescribed diet. I don't know if this will help, but I'll try.

 

The goal of a low residue diet (in humans anyhow) is to reduce the amount and frequency of stool and slow intestinal transit time by eating easily digestible foods and avoiding foods that make the digestive system work harder. It requires low fiber and also avoidance or limitations of foods that tend to increase bowel movement (with people: milk and dairy, prune juice, etc). For people, its generally not recommended as a long term diet, though it can be adapted to work as such.

 

Megacolon is more common in cats so you might try researching what has worked for cat folks and see if it helps you any (cats are not dogs obviously, but it may help).

 

At this point, I haven't done enough research on the condition, but if it were my dog, I'd probably try a grain free, ground raw diet.

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The prescription food has gone through a process in which the proteins are broken down so tiny that the dog's body can't react to them. You will not be able to replicate a true low res diet at home.

 

I am not familiar with a low residue diet, but based on what Liz said above, I have a comment. When I have to bottle feed, I prefer to use goat milk rather than cow milk because the proteins in goat milk are much smaller than those in cow milk. I do not know how small the proteins should be to be considered for a low residue diet (I would call them peptides if they were digested to a very small size), and I do not know what size the proteins are in goat milk, --- but it is something to consider.

 

In that same vein: what is the composition of human infant formula? Are some of those composed of peptides/small proteins?

 

Jovi

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Thanks everyone, LIz I hate to think what the do to the food :). There was no information on the can, could not even find any nutritional info. It looked like meat with a very high percentage of white rice which was very well cooked, ie full of water.

 

I have spent a lot of time with google and the word megacolon, there is very little about megacolon in dogs and from what I have read it is treated very differently in dogs than cats.

 

The last few days he has been eating cooked chicken, white rice, pumpkin and supplements and it has been agreeing with him.

 

We are going to the vets this afternoon and hopefully his colon is looking normal, then I have to decide what to do next... I am convinced the problem was caused by the kibble so the next stage is home prepared; cooked raw mixture I really do not have a clue.

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I was searching the web and came across this:

 

"For dogs suffering from megacolon, exercise and regular activity are strongly encouraged for the health and strength of their digestive and abdominal muscles. A low-residue, high fiber diet may also help to prevent recurrences of megacolon. Another alternative is to supplement your dog’s regular maintenance diet with veterinarian approved fiber supplements or canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling). Avoid feeding any bones to your dog to protect against potential injuries to the colon when bones are swallowed, and to prevent clumps of partially digested bone from blocking the intestinal tract".

 

Not sure if it helps or not.

Good Luck with Brody! I'm sure you will find something that works :)

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