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aggressiveness toward bicycles & joggers


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My partner Huck is approximately 1.5 yrs old, we are new together (Aug. 2011). He is a working Goose Dog (Kuykendall Kennels NC, and works with me at an urban cemetery in Boston (300 acres)He is very effective at his job, although he will break after bicyclists and joggers and disregard his call-off command. This frightens me (not to mention the bicyclists or joggers, and I don't want to see anyone get hurt including Huck. Does anyone have any advice to correct this behavior or suggestions on reenforcing his commands; Which are: That'll Do, Here, Down amongst others. I have been thinking about also introducing whistle commands to the mix, maybe to "penetrate the surrounding noise, commotion and grab his attention at a distance.

 

I am a new handler and this is my first BC. Other than that we are closely bonded. He also doesn't like it when people approach a vehicle (golf cart or truck)in which he is sitting when we are out and about the property.

 

thanks, Rich

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My Blue Heeler likes to lunge after bicycles as well. I try to first off take care to watch for bicyclists so we can move far out of the way if possible. I also try to make him sit and watch me while the bike passes but it does not always work. I also try his leave it command, which again has about a 75% success rate. I'd be curious to hear what everyone's ideas are for how to solve this problem.

 

Funny thing with my heeler is that we use those Walky Dog bike attachments and he runs besides my bike no problem. :huh:

 

My BC has no problems with bikes, but I'm worried he may pick up on the bad behavior of the other dog.

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Have you contacted the person you got the dog from? I looked at the site for the place you got him from and they say they "guarantee" their dogs and give life time support. So I would think they would be able to help you. I would also think they would have proofed his goose dog training a little better in real life situations.

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I'm a cyclist. And our border collie died almost a year ago at just over 15 years. So I think I have experience on both sides of this.

 

Simply getting a dog to sit and stay, while it really really really wants to get that bike (or runner or car or deer or whatever) is not enough. Because the dog still really really really want to get IT!

 

We taught Fergie "NO!" Not "sit";not "stay"; but "NO!" No you do not watch, bother, follow, or chase any animal, person, vehicle....

 

We could walk down the driveway with deer on the edge, and she and they looked, nodded, and were totally cool. We could take her to a criterium (a bike race of multiple laps on a short loop of city streets) and all she cared about was getting children to schnozzle with her.

 

I have a fear that teaching a dog to run along with a bicycle - even with any kind of connector - teaches the dog to run along with bicycles. From the number of dogs who have chased us - and the number of dead dogs I've seen on roadsides - this does not seem to be a good lesson.

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I have been thinking about also introducing whistle commands to the mix, maybe to "penetrate the surrounding noise, commotion and grab his attention at a distance.

 

 

I noticed in your post "grab his attention at a distance"; I have similar problems with Dex in obeying commands or re-call from a distance.

 

He always responds promptly close-in but will often ignore my commands at a distance. There is no problem with his hearing, I think it has more to do with the fact that I have let him get out of the "zone" and he feels that since he is off on his own he can now do as he pleases (Usually after I have let him wander without a regular command for any length of time).

 

I'm by no means an expert but maybe staying closer to Huck (if possible) will yield better results...Breeder may have advice as well.

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We taught Fergie "NO!" Not "sit";not "stay"; but "NO!" No you do not watch, bother, follow, or chase any animal, person, vehicle....

 

 

I agree with this. Come down hard on the dog to drive the lesson home. It's too important as a safety issue to mess around with.

 

Bonny, at six months old (she's a year tomorrow), started to lunge after cars. My solution was to walk with her on the sidewalk next to a semi-busy street. When a car came by and she lunged, I gave her a very forceful 'NO!' Like, to the point that passersby probably thought I was abusive. But it didn't take more than a few repetitions before she understood not to do that.

 

By going somewhere where there are cars going by, you can treat it as a training session every time you go.

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I would also say this is a VERY serious safety issue, not only for the dog but the people jogging/on the bike that he wants to chase....

 

The dog is reacting to the fast movement of the jogging person, bike, or in alot of cases with border collies...a car. Car issues are obviously more serious for the dog as they could die being struck or run over by a moving vehicle....but with the dog wanting to chase things with people involved, you are risking there safety and the dogs...

 

There are MANY great threads on this forum that have covered this kind of subject...dogs who want to chase cars, animals, bikes, etc...there are some really great suggestions..

 

I have personally dealt with this issue with two seperate dogs..both required getting REAL tough on the dog to drive the lesson home!!!

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I just remembered what my cousin had me do. He was a dog trainer. He told me to get an empty soda or beer can, rinse it out and let it dry, then put in a bunch of pennies and tape it closed. I carried that in my hand when I walked Fergie. If she even looked at a car, I gave the can a hard shake near her head while I said, "NO!" It really worked. In about a week, she chose not to bother with cars.

 

Wouldn't do it at a crit, though. I know a lot of the riders - and they know me. And where to find me if I scare them into a crash.

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