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How can I find a breeder who feeds raw?


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We are most likely moving from Sacramento to Redding, CA, after my mom gets married. Which means we will have both the space and finances for a second border collie :)

I'm looking to purchase from a breeder...and I would REALLY like a breeder that feeds raw. To me, nutrition is one of the most important things for a puppy. I've seen the wonders that raw meat has done for my dog and would like a breeder who does the same.

How can I find a good breeder who feeds raw, without having to spend hours calling around? I realize I'll probably have to have the puppy shipped as chances I'll find one in my area are probably low.

I have found Creekside Border Collies of Canada and Orion Border Collies of...Philadelphia, I think. However I'd like to look at more than just two breeders.

Help/advice?

 

 

ETA: You guys are right. Although it's be nice, I guess it's not priority.

If you guys know of any reputable breeders around the Sacramento or Redding area, I'd appreciate either links or e-mail addresses.

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I would think (or rather, hope) that raw feeding should be a ways down the list of priorities when selecting a breeder or a pup. First and foremost should be the pup itself and its parents--are they all proven to a high level of working ability? Has this particular cross been done before, and what are those pups like, work-wise? If this cross has not been done previously, then why are these two dogs being bred? What does the breeder expect from this cross, again, work-wise?

 

If you select your pup based on these criteria, when you get the pup at 8 weeks, that's really soon enough to start it on raw. Since the mom is probably still nursing until 6 weeks or beyond, those couple of weeks on puppy kibble (or whatever) are really not going to do any harm.

 

Please select your pup and breeder based on the philosophy of this board, as explained in the "Read This First" at the top of the page; you then have 15 or so years to feed the way you prefer.

 

A (someone who feeds raw)

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I have to agree with stockdogranch, finding a breeder who feeds raw would be very low on my list of priorities, under working ability, how and where the puppies were raised and handled as wee ones, hip status, the temperament of the parents etc.

 

If you find all this and the breeder feeds raw, great! But if not, I wouldn't worry about it. The pup will do fine starting with you as a younger pup.

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I do know how to find a good breeder, and no the food is not the most important to me...but it's just something I would like. I'm not dead set on it, but it would be nice.

 

I have to ask what is your definition of a good breeder to begin with? Based on the kennel names you mentioned I think the views here and yours are very different.

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I have to ask what is your definition of a good breeder to begin with? Based on the kennel names you mentioned I think the views here and yours are very different.

 

A good breeder..Some one who works their dogs, ABCA registered, does all the genetic testing. Doesn't breed for color, doesn't sell to the first person who shows up with money in their hands.

I know what to look for in breeders when it comes to the health and temperaments and other basics. But this -will- be my first time looking for a breeder for a Border Collie, which is why I'm looking for advice on here.

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I really commend you on reaching out on here for advice. Way to be a smart cookie! :D You might've already done this, but I believe it's ABCA that has a list of all breeders registered with them on their site. They're listed by state and have links to the individual breeders' websites. I'm sorry if I'm not much help to you, but really hope you can find the breeder that has your future puppy waiting! :D

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A good breeder..Some one who works their dogs, ABCA registered, does all the genetic testing. Doesn't breed for color, doesn't sell to the first person who shows up with money in their hands.

I know what to look for in breeders when it comes to the health and temperaments and other basics. But this -will- be my first time looking for a breeder for a Border Collie, which is why I'm looking for advice on here.

 

Ok, can you be specific? What genetic tests? What type of work? Farm work, trial work, weekend work? What type of stock? How long are you willing to wait for your new pup?

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I really commend you on reaching out on here for advice. Way to be a smart cookie! :D You might've already done this, but I believe it's ABCA that has a list of all breeders registered with them on their site. They're listed by state and have links to the individual breeders' websites. I'm sorry if I'm not much help to you, but really hope you can find the breeder that has your future puppy waiting! :D

ABCA is simply a registry. Just because a person breeds and registers dogs with ABCA is absolutely no guarantee of quality or responsible breeding. Of course, being an AKC breeder is totally a red flag for people on this board.

 

Being listed as a breeder on a group or other source site is also not generally a guarantee of anything. Usually, it's just a matter of being a member and paying the fee and you are listed.

 

Websites may tell you quite a lot but oftentimes it is reading between the lines and the nice photos that tells you the most. I think asking here, and receiving either replies or PMs is one good way to check things out, and I'm glad the OP has done so.

 

Best wishes to the OP for finding the right pup from the right source.

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Dear Doggers,

 

Well known (frequent) breeders have long waiting lists and some won't sell to non-livestock homes. Infrequent breeders -like myself - get more inquiries than they can satisfy. Not many top breeders advertise pups on websites. Most don't advertise anywhere.

 

That said: the pool of working Border Collie pups is, by purebred dog standards, unusually sound. My sport is sheepdog trialing but I've seen ranch dogs that've never seen a trial field I would have bought and their pups would be as good as all but the magical few we trial people are seeking. But I know what I'm looking for and you don't. Unfortunately some cattlemen believe a dog's most vital equipment is his jaws and some farmers' Border Collie is a fashion statement for their pickup truck.

 

There are always pups from good dogs available BUT you need to be there, on the spot, now. I would advise attending a USBCHA trial near your destination and asking who has pups for sale. It is likely these pups will be ABCA registered from top working stock. The parents may or may not have been genetically tested for CEA, probably have been tested at the Finals for CEA and/or PRA, may or may not be tested for hip dysplasia and probably won't have been fed a raw diet - though some may have been.

 

You don't know what might constitute a good working pup and, although cheap by show dog standards, the pup you'll find at the trial will be more expensive than the pup you can buy from a local farmer.

 

Most Border Collie pups are sound, most will be useful working companions. Unlike many show breeds, one needn't search out the breeder who somehow manages to avoid the breed's genetic defects.

 

If you like and trust the breeder and really like the pup's parents, you'll be fine.

 

Donald McCaig

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I have to ask what is your definition of a good breeder to begin with? Based on the kennel names you mentioned I think the views here and yours are very different.

 

Not to hijack the thread but may I ask what would be the issue with Creekside? (I'm looking at rescue first but also starting to research breeders anywhere within 8hrs drive from Ottawa, preferably in Canada).

 

From the website, the breeder looks involved with trialing (represented Canada at the World's in 2008?) and certainly appeared to me -from website reading- as being a responsible breeder of working border collies.

 

Unlike other place in Canada such as this one (which shows up on top on Google) who raise a lot more red flags:

http://www.bordercollie.org/boards/index.php?showtopic=23168

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I'm looking to purchase from a breeder...and I would REALLY like a breeder that feeds raw. To me, nutrition is one of the most important things for a puppy. I've seen the wonders that raw meat has done for my dog and would like a breeder who does the same.

 

 

I'm glad to see you edited your post, because I was going to say, finding a breeder who feeds raw is severely limiting yourself. An 8 or 9 week old puppy will have only been on solid food a couple weeks or so, which means you'll have the option to feed your pup any diet you prefer. A well-bred dog from good working stock, whose parents have good hips, elbows and eyes is probably going to be every bit as healthy as you wish.

 

I wish I could help with the breeder question, but a person to get in touch with might be Suzy Applegate. She lives in Plymouth, CA and she knows tons of dog people in the general Sacramento area. Here's her website, where you can find her contact info:

http://www.hoofandpawfarms.com/

 

She's at the Sheepdog Finals in Colorado right now, so don't expect her home for a few days, yet.

 

Best of luck with your puppy search!

 

~ Gloria

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