Jump to content
BC Boards

Getting a dog to eat?


Maralynn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Missy has gotten very picky in what she eats. She was never a huge food dog to begin with. She's been on raw for years but I've switched her off of since her diagnosis - didn't want to deal with any sort of pathogen overload.

 

Her attitude is still okay in other regards, she is slowing down and tires easily, but can still jump in the car, wants to go to the barn, etc.

 

It's the food thing that is driving me nuts. She'll eat meat - and it has to be real meat (I've tried EVO canned and she'll lick at it then leave it) and some kibble, but that's random. Sometimes I'll line the dogs up and dish out kibble as treats then she'll eat it. She still comes and begs when you're eating something and will usually eat meat/starch that is offered to her.

 

Today I tried adding a little salt to her cooked chicken/oatmeal and she even ate most of the oatmeal - which kinda surprised me.

 

So any other tips to make her food palitable? I'm trying to stick to easy to digest foods

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about some nice haggis? :D

 

I pretty much feed them whatever they want that won't upset their GI system if I know they don't have very long. You should keep in mind with cancer that their bodies are not able to use food as efficiently as before. They have an increased need for easy to digest fats and proteins. Certain organ meats, fatty fish and eggs are good for that. You can often pick up scraps of fatty meat cheap or free from the butcher. A lot of dogs like yogurt (full fat). I am surprised she won't eat canned Evo. My dogs go mad for that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm, maybe I should give the haggis a try :lol:

 

She ate the EVO for a while then started turning her nose up at it. She'll even pick the real meat out of it if I try to mix it. Go figure.

 

She quit eating eggs a couple months ago. Will spit those out or eat around them. Kipp and Kenzi would just about kill for the food she walks away from.

 

I think I've got canned salmon so I'll give that a try. I've got organ meats in the freezer so I'll dig some of those out. Thanks for the suggestions!

 

I looked into both home cooked cancer diets and home cooked liver support diets (because the cancer has spread there) and the information kind of contradicted each other. High fat vs. moderate to low fat, higher protien vs. moderate carbs, etc. But If I can seriously just get something that she'll eat, I'll be happy. She does act better if she eats a full meal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sara liked low-sodium chicken or beef broth (or homemade soup)added to her food (and sometimes just as a treat to get some extra calories in her). I bought really cheap cuts of beef, and made meat heavy stews in the crockpot to tenderize the meat, and then pureed them them so they were easier for her to eat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mara,

I think at this stage getting her to eat period is probably more important than worrying about whether one thing or another is going to adversely affect her liver or the cancer. If she still shows interest in meat, why not just cook it for her? My picky eater is more inclined to eat her raw meals if they're at least seared. If you fully cook, you lose some of the benefits of raw, but you do protect against pathogens. My dogs universally love browned ground lamb and ground venison (both seem to be much preferred over beef or chicken), so maybe it's worth a try with Missy. I've found that canned cat food is often smelly enough to encourage eating and use that now for Jill or her "I don't want to eat" days.

 

My picky eaters also like yogurt and cottage cheese. You're probably going to go through a lot of things just trying to get her to eat *something,* but at least your other dogs can take care of the rejects.

 

BC Friend's idea of crockpot cooking is good too!

 

ETA: My dogs also go crazy over the baby food I buy for my 18-y.o. cat. It's costly, but in a pinch if she likes it, it could help. You can get beef, chicken, or turkey and according to the label, they contain nothing but the meat and some broth.

 

If you're doing any supplements, B complex might be helpful for her.

 

J.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Zachary stopped eating before Christmas. I finally resorted to extra lean ground beef, boiled with fresh vegetables. Since Christmas, he has more energy, and his mental functions seem better. Mind you, he does not have cancer but he has all sorts of other health issues and I opted for getting food into him rather than worrying overmuch about what he was eating. Every day, he gets the lean beef & vegetables and later some of his kibble/canned diet food. There are days he won't touch his dog food and other days when he wolfs it down.

I hope you find the right combination for Missy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the tips and ideas!! I'll start trying them out and see what works.

 

My whole family has been spoiling her - I think she schmoozed food from just about everyone on Sunday during our family dinner. Apparently food tastes better when it's from a human plate. My dad sliced up leftover steak afterwards and gave her some, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Solid Gold also has a canned tripe that my dogs love. I think it's called "Green Cow" or something like that. Stores that carry other Solid Gold products would probably carry it.

We feed this brand of canned tripe, too. Here's a link to the PetCo listing for it, just fyi. We've also fed Tripett brand, but that's harder to find, at least in our area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is from a training list I am on from Shirley Chong who is OK with sharing it:

 

I used to make Millie's Crockpot Chicken in a pressure cooker. Basically, you buy a whole chicken and cover it with water, add root veggies or rice, then cook until soft and mash the whole thing up (bones and all). In the crockpot, this means 4-6 hours on high and 4-20 hours on medium. In the pressure cooker, it means 90 minutes on high. The bones become so soft that you can literally pulverise them with your fingers, let alone a potato masher or blender.

 

I gave the vet hospital a big container of Millie's Crock Pot Chicken for Bidge when he was recovering from his surgery and they were so impressed at the response of all the dogs in ICU whenever they opened Bidge's container that they asked me for the recipe and bought a crock pot to fix it. They said it actually works better than the Science Diet canned stuff that is supposed to be highly palatable for inappetant dogs.

 

For many inappetant dogs, Miracle Whip is the magic condiment. Who knew so many dogs were crazy about the stuff?

 

Another magic condiment for dogs with a sweet tooth is canned whipped cream.

 

Strained baby food meat is usually very welcome.

 

Sometimes all it takes is warm chicken broth (not too hot).

 

Sometimes older dogs and dogs with cancer do better with a little of this and a little of that. I use a muffin tin to serve small amounts of differently flavoured foods. I also use a muffin tin to slow down a dog that tends to inhale their food.

 

I have made crockpot chicken and I had to cook it dfor a long time (12 hrs) but it was well recieved. My dog also seemed to have his appetite enhanced with tomato sauce and parmesean cheese when he stopped eating due to his cancer. I made him a little pit of pasta and mixed it with the tomato and boiled chicken then sprinkled the parm on it. He picked out the pasta but he's eat other stuff with the sauce on it (canned dog food, etc).

 

He was also willing to drink homemade broth (no salt) that I had boiled for a long time with bones etc so it was all jelly when it cooled and I think he got some calories from that that didn't make him fill his stomach.

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When my Bob had cancer, a lot of times the only thing he would eat was grilled cheese sandwhiches ;-) He also really liked pumpkin flat breads...There is a product called Dyne, that is really good, it's high caloric, and the dogs seem to love it, it smells like vanilla. It comes in a liquid, so you can either pour it on their feed or syringe it into their mouth, you can get it at most feed stores, and a lot of pet stores carry it as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ended up giving her three raw meals today. And she happily gobbled up each of them. She hasn't been that happy about food (unless it was fed from the table :rolleyes: ) for almost a week. So I guess for now it will be back to raw. A happy, eating dog trumps pathogen concerns.

 

I made the crockpot chicken (it smelled incredible - my family was ready to eat it!) on Tuesday, fed her two meals of it and I was thinking "yay, finally!!!", then she wasn't interested. I put some out today and nope, wasn't touching it. But she nearly grabbed the raw chicken thigh out of my hand. I sure would like to know her thought process!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ended up giving her three raw meals today. And she happily gobbled up each of them. She hasn't been that happy about food (unless it was fed from the table :rolleyes: ) for almost a week. So I guess for now it will be back to raw. A happy, eating dog trumps pathogen concerns.

 

I made the crockpot chicken (it smelled incredible - my family was ready to eat it!) on Tuesday, fed her two meals of it and I was thinking "yay, finally!!!", then she wasn't interested. I put some out today and nope, wasn't touching it. But she nearly grabbed the raw chicken thigh out of my hand. I sure would like to know her thought process!

 

Sometimes I think that, sometimes I'm not sure I want to know what they are thinking! :D I'm glad you at least found something she'll gladly eat.

 

 

It may be a function of her taste buds just wanting a variety.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tripett is available from K9Cuisine.com with free shipping. They usually have varieties too, which is awesome.

 

Consider the boredom factor also. Raw bones are so much fun to eat.

 

Gus had horrible teeth for a while but they were too sore to chew. I hit on the idea of stuffing a trachea tube with Tripett and deep freezing it.

 

Daisy hold the horses. I had to put Gus in a room by himself or let everyone else outside. These were too expensive to share with nine other dogs (at the time!).

 

Best Bully Sticks sells bulk trachea at a terrific price, high quality, not Merrick junk.

 

Also, I was having some trouble with my going on eighteen years old getting uninterested in dinner also. I have been feeding the kibble part of her diet in a puzzle toy. She gets pretty excited about it now!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Consider the boredom factor also. Raw bones are so much fun to eat.

 

------

 

Also, I was having some trouble with my going on eighteen years old getting uninterested in dinner also. I have been feeding the kibble part of her diet in a puzzle toy. She gets pretty excited about it now!

 

 

This makes soooo much sense!! Especially in light of today -

 

Missy has been happily eating her raw for three days. Today the cat was begging for something to eat so I pulled one of the open cans of EVO (that Miss had refused three days ago) out of the fridge and offered the cat some. Cat sniffed it and walked away. Missy walked over and ate it right up - gave her another big spoonful and she ate that too...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...