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Hey, folks! I have been hibernating for awhile after Sully's little flip out incidents awhile back, for anyone that recalls. Turns out if he thinks I'm upset he'll pounce on me, yowl, lick my face, and won't let me move. I watched the Shawshank Redemption (and for some reason I cry EVERY time I watch that movie). That's what sent my furry-ball-o-trouble over the edge and so it seems that when I'm upset he's on call. I must talk in my sleep and I think it gets him unraveled a bit and that's what sparked that whole fiasco. Yet things have been pretty quiet here other than that revelation - my beautiful black and white pooch continues to plot to take over the world, has some new goats (two nigerian dwarf's) to also antagonize (they do not like him... not at all), totally adores playing with the neighbor's german shepherd, enjoys chickens to chase if they venture into his domain (my chickens basically run around like lunatics), and so life has been good on my little hobby farm.

 

And then I got a hysterical call from a friend over... would-be dog-nappers.

 

She was home and had let her beautiful chocolate lab outside, whose going on six months old, and she was in having a cup of coffee. A van had recently been around the block as of late and she said she noticed it again - except this time it had slowed to a stop next to her house. Her fiance had been out and had taken the car so it looked like she wasn't home. She felt uneasy, alone with a strange van parking next to the house, so she picked up her cellphone and grabbed a pad of paper to go get the license plate number off the rig.

 

She got to the window, wrote down the number and then the unimaginable happened. Two young men got out of the vehicle, came up to her fence, and reached over to pet... and then pick up her beloved dog.

 

My friend dialed 911 to report the theft attempt in progress, ran out to her front porch and screamed at them to put her dog down (while trying to collectively tell the dispatcher what was going on). Thankfully Lou, her lab, was not interested in being hoisted over the fence and wriggled free from the men's grasp. The thieves bolted. Police are investigating...

 

Also, there has been a string of bizarre animal mutilations (people cutting tongues out of horses, killing peoples pets, pets going missing) an hour north of where I'm at, about half an hour north of where my friend lives...

 

This stuff is so strange it doesn't seem real. And I never imagined I'd fear this stuff or, more immediately, a friend's safety.

 

Thoughts, comments, questions, concerns for any of you out there about dognappers and such? This all seems so weird...

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Another good reason why dogs should never be outside unsupervised.

 

I often wish I had a fenced area for my dogs so it didn't always have to involve me when they needed to be outside, or so I could put them outside for a while rather than in their crates when I did not want to be "bothered" - but then I am grateful that there is no risk of them being stolen, getting into trouble because I'm not watching, barking at neighbors or anyone who walks or drives by, and that I have to be involved with them in exercise and walks.

 

I'm sorry that any area is experiencing depravity of the sort you describe. And dog thievery, for whatever end, is always a threat. Thank you for the reminder.

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This is something that has happened recently just a couple hours south of where I live. Reportedly, the same thing happened here four or five years ago. Some guys driving around in unmarked cargo van, stop, steal dogs. Well, turns out they're selling them at a well known puppy mill auction house in Illinois. I'm sure there's something similar in your area. I never leave mine out when we aren't home. Our yard is fenced 5 foot high witha locked gate, and the fence is on the back of the house, so no way for someone to get in without us noticing first. We contemplated putting in a gate on the side with no windows, but glad that we never ended up doing so after hearing those stories. It's horrible! If the dogs are spayed/nuetered and don't go at auction they meet the end of a gun barrel. I'm so glad that your friend's dog wiggled free and I hope that the authorities in your area find these people!

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Scary, scary stuff! There was something like that going on in my old area in Michigan last summer. A confirmed, and quite brazen, puppy stealing was reported by the local news channel. Seems an English Bulldog puppy was literally snatched from the arms of its twelve-year old girl in her own front yard by a group of people in a white van. Of course it sent up alarms (and arms!) of the entire dog community within a three county radius. I believe the perpetrators where eventually apprehended but I don't know if the puppy was ever found.

 

IMHO, leaving a dog outside, fence or no, is like leaving a two-year old child outside unattended. There's too much that can happen so quickly and I just don't do it, ever.

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Boy, do I agree with that. I never leave my dogs out when I'm not right there.

 

It's not just dognappers. Kids think it's funny to open the gate and let the dogs out. Or city employeeds come in and leave the gate open. I check the gate everytime I let the dogs out.

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Or city employeeds come in and leave the gate open.

 

That's a smart one to remember! Thankfully the town I live in will leave notice when they have to check meters, knowing I own dogs and they won't be friendly to someone coming in the gate. ;)

 

 

Thankfully your friend and her pup are safe! I can't imagine stuff like that going down, but it does...

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Wow, I guess that's more of an urban phenomenon. Here in the country, my dogs are out by themselves a lot. Of course to come to my house you have to come down a longish drive and pass the house to get to the dog yard. And the dogs certainly aren't going to let that go unannounced. Of course I suppose the UPS guy could steal Pip if he wanted, since last time he showed up Pip got in the truck with him....

 

That said, when I used to live in a small town, I would have to check for gates left open (back gate, not easily seen from the front/side dooors of the house) before letting dogs out. I finally put a lock on the gate, since it's only real purpose was to allow access to the back yard by a vehicle (for service-type stuff).

 

J.

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I have a doggy door, so there are times when my dogs are outside while I'm working inside. But I have a six-foot wooden privacy fence surrounding my yard, and all three gates are padlocked. (However, since the back fence is adjacent to an alley, one of my fears is that someone will throw something over the fence into my yard that could harm them. There's always something to worry about, I guess :unsure: )

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I have a similar situation: six foot wooden fence, so I leave my door open and let my dog hang out in the garden while I work inside. Like CindyfromRiley, I have no fear of my dog being stolen - though there is the possibility of someone trying, losing a hand and then suing. There are also the urban legends reported incidents of dogs being poisoned by tainted meat, or shot by police. There are so many awful things that could happen, but I guess you have to weigh that against the likelihood that it would, and benefits of letting your dog have the use of your yard.

 

I have a doggy door, so there are times when my dogs are outside while I'm working inside. But I have a six-foot wooden privacy fence surrounding my yard, and all three gates are padlocked. (However, since the back fence is adjacent to an alley, one of my fears is that someone will throw something over the fence into my yard that could harm them. There's always something to worry about, I guess :unsure: )

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shot by police. There are so many awful things that could happen

 

Berkeley’s deadly force policy allows an officer to dispatch an animal that poses a threat, said Sgt. Kusmiss. This fell under that policy, she said. This only happens a few times a year, she added.

 

Because a few times a year is alright? Ridiculous.

 

When approached by a threatening dog, officers can use pepper spray, a Taser or gun to deter the animal. In this case, the officer probably didn't have time for pepper spray or Tasers, Thomason said.

 

It's disgusting. Doesn't have time to shoot his taser, or spray pepper spray, but has time to take out his gun, switch the safety and kill the poor thing? They said the lab barked and growled, never mentioned advancing (which they would of if it happened), so there was obviously time. It wasn't a split second decision. And the officer who fired didn't have the guts to go apologize. What a group of people.

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