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Anyone have an opinion of salt being listed as #12 on the ingredient list of dog food? It seems kind of high on the list for salt but everything else on the ingredient list looks wonderful. Im looking to switch to a lower fat % and calories, "someone" is getting a little thick around the ribs :o) here's the ingredient list in question:

 

Ingredients

Lamb, lamb meal, sweet potatoes, potatoes, peas, canola oil, pea protein, roasted lamb, tomato pomace, natural flavor, salt, choline chloride, mixed tocopherols (a natural preservative and source of vitamin E), dried chicory root, taurine, tomatoes, blueberries, raspberries, yucca schidigera extract, dried fermentation products of Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum, dried Trichoderma longibrachiatum fermentation extract, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, niacin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin D supplement, folic acid.

 

Thanks for any input!

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I have never thought about the issue of salt in a dog food, but now that you have raised the issue, I will be interested to hear the opinions of others. Looking at the ingredient list, I note that most of the other ingredients that are lower on the list are mostly minerals and vitamins that are effective a very low concentrations. And since salt is a fairly heavy component (say compared to a powdered mineral or whatever), it is not surprising that it would be higher on the ingredient list. I do wonder why there is 'more' salt than the blueberries, raspberries and tomatoes. I realize that there are beneficial properties to these fruits, but even as dried components, I would think that they should be higher on the ingredient list to be effective. Maybe they were included for marketing purposes.

 

Jovi

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Like low quality human foods, salt is added in large amounts to increase "flavor" and is also helpful as preservative. Often listed as sodium chloride. My understanding is that there is plenty of salt to go around in non-processed foods for humans and animals and that large amounts are not really desirable.

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Based upon Vitamins, Minerals, and Supplements (I did not check the info against other sources) the daily requirements for dogs suggest the food should have at least 0.06% sodium, 0.09% chloride, and 0.008% iron (listed as a reference point) by weight. Since canine and human metabolisms are not identical be careful in extrapolating human nutritional guidelines to canine nutritional guidelines.

 

Mark

 

 

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Dogs do not typically deal with the same health issues that humans do with regard to sodium intake. Additionally, they do not consume it in nearly the vast quantity that we (Americans, at least) do.

 

I actually add salt to all of Luke's meals. It's part of treating his Addison's Disease. We regularly monitor his sodium and potassium levels -- His medication keeps his potassium in check but his sodium values were always reading a bit low. Although the medication says it is not necessary, we decided to supplement him with each meal. It brought his numbers up nicely to where they should be.

 

I don't measure it precisely -- Just dump some into the palm of my hand and throw it in his dish.

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Based upon Vitamins, Minerals, and Supplements (I did not check the info against other sources) the daily requirements for dogs suggest the food should have at least 0.06% sodium, 0.09% chloride, and 0.008% iron (listed as a reference point) by weight. Since canine and human metabolisms are not identical be careful in extrapolating human nutritional guidelines to canine nutritional guidelines.

 

Mark

Thanks for the link.... straight to the point info.... im gonna have to read more of this..

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