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I still take off ticks the old fashion way as I've been for 30 years. Each dog gets a brushing and a tick check each night and I pull them off. I've never used any flea or tick preventatives, I'm more afraid of the toxic chemicals then getting Lyme disease, or other tick borne diseases.

I used a tick collar once and my dog lost all hair around her neck and was agitated.

 

They do get grated garlic in their homemade food and diatomaceous earth.

I apply a little rose of geranium on their coats when out in the fields, greatly lessened the amount of ticks.

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You have to remember, too, that Frontline doesn't repel ticks. I think Advantix claims to, not sure how effective it is. And once ticks get on your dog, it can take 24 hours for the stuff to kill 'em because it has to get through all that tough armor. So you will find ticks even if the Frontline is working. Hopefully they'll be on their way to dying, or be dead (not uncommon at all for people to find dead, attached ticks), but they'll still be there. Ticks are tough buggers.

 

Vetri-science (people who make Glycoflex) have an herbal spray out now that is supposed to repel fleas, ticks, and mosquitos. I haven't tried it but I'd be very interested to. My BC swims so much, though, so I don't know how effective it would be, even if we apply it every time we go out hiking/swimming.

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I've been using a product called Omni Super Spray on myself and dogs. It contains a proprietary blend of Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Neem Leaf Extract, Thyme Extract, Golden Seal Extract, Green Tea Extract and Olive Leaf Extract, Alcohol SD 39C, Glycerin, Water, Neem Oil, Coconut Oil, Decyl Glucoside, Behentrimonium Methosulfate, Cetearyl Alcohol, D-Limonene, Sodium Hydroxide, Cedarwood Oil, Citronella, Lemon Grass Oil, Rhodium Wood Oil, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis Seed Extract, Lavender Oil.

 

Seems to work well. We have had a lot of ticks this spring and this seems to keep them from attaching to me or the dogs. Available from Planet Blue Dog http://www.planetblu...ray-coming-soon

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Repeating a warning: If you (the general you) have cats that come into contact with you, your clothes, or your dogs on which you are spraying any product containing essential oils, please remember that essential oils can be toxic (fatal) to the cats.

 

J.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just took Emma our BC for her annual check up and decided to check her for Lyme and sure she would have to test positive, so now we are waiting for the blood test to return to see what the level are in her blood, really a disappointing visit to the vets for our young girl. Well we will have to deal with it, the yes no test was very light if that means anything at this point.

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Burdock when susquehanna county humane was super rescue friendly we had alot dogs test neg for hw and pos on the lymes. It depended on the vet but, some did the 2 weeks of doxi and some did nothing unless symptoms showed of lymes infection. (Genie did the doxi) She will always test pos so I'm told even if you do the doxi.

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Yes/no means just that. The more definitive test will give you more definitive answers. Are you getting a C6 test? The folks on Tick-L recommend the C6 because changes in that level can indicate success of treatment, and it's good to have a baseline from the beginning.

 

J.

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I've read about diet changes or supplements that sometimes work to repel ticks. Here's part of an article that I found--

 

A good diet with added crushed garlic cloves will keep your dog’s immune system strong. Add a tablespoon of organic apple-cider vinegar to your dog’s water bowl, and supplement your dog’s diet with vitamin B complex and Omega 3 and 6. Ticks will not bite a dog that has these supplements in its system.

 

I can't verify the effectiveness but it makes more sense to fight these things from within as opposed to applying a poison to our dogs. If you want the link I'll post it. Normally I won't send anyone on a goose chase.

 

I got a chuckle out of one response above. The garlic is meant to be taken as a food supplement, not as a remedy applied to the skin. You won't smell nearly as bad that way! :)

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I don't do the garlic anymore, but a couple of my dogs get B complex and they all get omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, and the ticks still bite like mad.

 

Most of the folks I know who tried garlic at the recommended levels found their dogs couldn't tolerate it (i.e., diarrhea).

 

Anyway, I believe in simple, holistic rememdies when they work, but it's important to remember that if they really did work, no one would be buying flea and tick products because we'd all be going for the ACV, garlic, and fatty acids, which are a whole lot cheaper!

 

J.

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Her blood count was 85 picking up the pills tomorrow for her to take for a month, she gets the Omega 3-6 in her food and will check into the other suggestions with vet to see what he thinks. We had a Black Lab before the BC and she never had any ticks on her that we found anyway. Lets check out the link and thanks for the info.

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Here's the link. It's pretty lite. I'm not young anymore and don't believe everything I read, especially on the web, so this isn't a recommendation from me. I just went searching and found this. I'm sure there are more and will talk to a groomer friend about tick solutions via diet. http://www.keepurpethealthy.com/2011/03/22/natural-tick-protection-for-dogs.html

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Just got back from the vet... Sully has lyme, a strong positive. Went ahead and got the pills :( I haven't seen any changes in his behavior or activity level the past few weeks, so hopefully we caught it early enough that he'll be fine.

Vet also gave me a tick collar that can be used in conjunction with the Frontline with no adverse affects called "Prevetic". She suggested using it when we hike or go outside, but not to have him wear it constantly.

:(

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I'm sorry for the Lyme diagnosis. You may want to join Tick-L for good advice on treatment and more information you can pass on to your vet if needed: Tick links. <-- Has info on joining as well as links to lots of really good informative pages on tick diseases.

 

The main thing to know about the Preventic collar is that it shouldn't get wet. I think they say if it's rained on it's okay, but it shouldn't be on your dog if he's going swimming or anything. Some folks swear it's the main best tick preventive out there.

 

I hope Sully doesn't develop symptoms and that the treatment gets all the Lyme.

 

J.

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So far no problems with our Emma taking the pill only 53 more pills to go we are also giving her the acidophilus bacteria pills after her afternoon pill and so far no throwing up or diarrhea. Good luck to all those with Lyme positive animals.

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I don't do the garlic anymore, but a couple of my dogs get B complex and they all get omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, and the ticks still bite like mad.

 

Most of the folks I know who tried garlic at the recommended levels found their dogs couldn't tolerate it (i.e., diarrhea).

 

Anyway, I believe in simple, holistic rememdies when they work, but it's important to remember that if they really did work, no one would be buying flea and tick products because we'd all be going for the ACV, garlic, and fatty acids, which are a whole lot cheaper!

 

J.

 

I've been using garlic for years, along with homemade diet, and Rose Germanium Oil on the coat.

If you put your nose to my dogs coat, they do smell of garlic!

 

Here's a garlic secret;

 

Garlic increases general immune activity along with the activity of special Killer Cells that seek out invading bacteria. But there's a secret to releasing the full healing power of garlic. Finely chop the clove or cloves of garlic and then let them sit for 10 to 20 minutes. During this time a chemical reaction will take place that releases the allicin in the garlic. This is the most powerful medicinal compound within the garlic. Helping the immune system handle and clear out bacteria before they take hold is the best way to prevent tick borne diseases.

 

Garlic also helps to repel fleas and ticks and does so even more effectively if you chop it first and allow it to sit. But don't wait more than 20 minutes to serve it on your dog's meal. A medium to large dog can get 2 to 3 finely diced cloves a day, a small dog 1-2 cloves and dogs weighing less than 20 pounds can get one clove a day.

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