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Disposition of boarder collies


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I am interested to know about general disposition of bc's towards each other. I may purchase 2 bc pups. I'm not breeding now, so they would be spayed or neutered accordingly. I would get 2 if I thought 1 would be lonely. Then I thought if I got 2 they might compete against each other for affection of the children thereby creating some hostilite competitive relationship with each other. I was thinking of getting 2 females and would they get along vs 2 males vs 1 male + 1 female?

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With dogs in general, you'd probably be better off with one male and one female, rather than two of the same sex, but really it just depends on the dogs.

 

I would not get two puppies at the same time. Been there, done that. Its A LOT of work. You can take puppy classes and/or find neighbors, friends, and family with friendly dogs for your dog to socialize with. With kids in the house, a single dog should not be lonely. If he/she is, then you probably don't have the right lifestyle for a dog, especially a border collie.

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With dogs in general, you'd probably be better off with one male and one female, rather than two of the same sex, but really it just depends on the dogs.

 

I would not get two puppies at the same time. Been there, done that. Its A LOT of work. You can take puppy classes and/or find neighbors, friends, and family with friendly dogs for your dog to socialize with. With kids in the house, a single dog should not be lonely. If he/she is, then you probably don't have the right lifestyle for a dog, especially a border collie.

 

 

Thanks for your response!

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Just want to make a second on the don't get two puppies at the same time!! Don't do it no matter how tempting it is. Not only is it more than twice the work, but the puppies may bond more with each other than with you and training can therefore be much more difficult. Best bet if this is your first border collie is to do lots and lots and lots of research first. These message boards are a great resource for information on the breed and what it is like to live with one. Make sure you really want a border collie! They are not like other dogs in some ways and can be a real challenge for the uninitiated. Also, if you decide you want one please, please get one from a BC rescue group.

D'Elle

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Two pups are 10x the work of one. They get each other into trouble. :rolleyes: The only time I have seen two pups work in a pet situation was a retired couple, already savvy with the breed, who each got one from the litter. It sounds like you have your hands full with human family. If I was in your position I wold be considering a trained service dog, not a young pup.

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Just want to make a second on the don't get two puppies at the same time!! Don't do it no matter how tempting it is. Not only is it more than twice the work, but the puppies may bond more with each other than with you and training can therefore be much more difficult. Best bet if this is your first border collie is to do lots and lots and lots of research first. These message boards are a great resource for information on the breed and what it is like to live with one. Make sure you really want a border collie! They are not like other dogs in some ways and can be a real challenge for the uninitiated. Also, if you decide you want one please, please get one from a BC rescue group.

D'Elle

 

 

thanks for your response!

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As the owner of an eleven-month-old puppy, I shudder in fear to think of what having TWO of them at the same time might be like! ;)

 

I would get one, deal with all the work involved including training, socialization and structure that he or she will have to have to grow up to be a well-mannered family pet and then (if you have decided that you still want two) get a second dog. These things take up a lot of your time and energy, do you really have the time and energy for two? And if you don't devote a lot of one on one training and time apart to the puppies, you can end up (as someone said) with two dogs who are more bonded to each other than they are to you.

 

In addition to two puppies being a lot of work, consider the issues of having two old dogs at the same time down the road: geriatric dogs can have a lot of expensive problems and losing them is hard. Having had two old dogs both having health issues and dealing with that (both the stress and the expense)and the grief of losing two beloved family members within a few months of each other, I have since spaced out my pets in ages.

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I think it would depend entirely on the individual dogs. If they are spayed or neutered, that would probably cut down on interpersonal tiffs, but I tend to favor a mix: 1 male, 1 female. However, a great deal would depend on how you raise them.

 

That said, I'll second the caution against getting two puppies at once. Unless you're experienced with dogs and understand the double-trouble of TWO active puppies' mischief, I'd advise caution. Not only do they egg each other on in every everything they do, but as others have noted, the pups may bond so closely with each other and be so focused on each other, that you'll have a hard time training them.

 

Forgive me for asking, but are you familiar with border collies? Do you have the time, space and energy for training and governing two high-energy pups at once? Will they be crate-trained? Do you have a good-sized yard? Are you a new dog owner or have your owned a number of dogs over the years? Are your children old enough to back you up and go along with the pup(s) training? What are your plans for these pups, in the long run?

 

Just some questions to move the conversation along. :)

 

~ Gloria

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  • 2 months later...

As a crazy owner of 2 bc pups, I do have a question about training them to bond less with each other and more with us. My children are older and I have a daughter interested in learning about training, agility, etc. We did have a Border for 9 years until he died and decided on 2 pups so that she could train with me. I am searching for any helpful training advice on the bonding issue as I am working separately some with them, but want to do what is good for them and push their training forward. We will start obedience/agility classes this fall and am enjoying this pell mell puppy time. If anyone does have suggestions for me, I would appreciate any advice in any area. Thanks!

Rochelle ~

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As a crazy owner of 2 bc pups, I do have a question about training them to bond less with each other and more with us. My children are older and I have a daughter interested in learning about training, agility, etc. We did have a Border for 9 years until he died and decided on 2 pups so that she could train with me. I am searching for any helpful training advice on the bonding issue as I am working separately some with them, but want to do what is good for them and push their training forward. We will start obedience/agility classes this fall and am enjoying this pell mell puppy time. If anyone does have suggestions for me, I would appreciate any advice in any area. Thanks!

Rochelle ~

 

You might want to consider getting a book or video on clicker training. It is something that you can do with the puppies, and your children can learn to do. It can be a great help with bonding, and with teaching your puppies both fun and more practical things. To prepare for an Agility class you can use the clicker to teach the puppies to nose touch targets, walk over (low and safe) different surfaces, sit and stay, come when called, etc.

 

If you go to the Karen Pryor clicker website, you will find a large selection of materials, many suitable for someone who is just getting started.

 

I wish you the best with them.

 

To the OP: I definitely recommend one puppy at a time. In addition to the fact that it is more work now, you might want to consider the future. While it might be nice to have two dogs the same age in their prime, when they get older, you will have two senior dogs at once. Spacing them out is much better, both when they are very young, and in preparation for when they get older.

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As a crazy owner of 2 bc pups, I do have a question about training them to bond less with each other and more with us. My children are older and I have a daughter interested in learning about training, agility, etc. We did have a Border for 9 years until he died and decided on 2 pups so that she could train with me. I am searching for any helpful training advice on the bonding issue as I am working separately some with them, but want to do what is good for them and push their training forward. We will start obedience/agility classes this fall and am enjoying this pell mell puppy time. If anyone does have suggestions for me, I would appreciate any advice in any area. Thanks!

Rochelle ~

Separate training is good. Definitely continue.

 

If you think your pups are bonding to each other too much, I would begin to separate them and allow only limited time together. During this period, you and your daughter should be intereacting/training with them individually. They should begin to bond more to you. You should become their favorite individual to play with - not the other dog.

 

 

When I got my pup, the breeder suggested the same approach: that I limit the time that my pup interacted with my older dog. (Actually, my 8 year old female wasn't that interested in playing with the pup anyway.) She suggested that the pup spend 10-20% of their time playing with another dog. The rest of the time should be lots of playing and training with you and crate rest. Continue with this regime until the pups are about 6-8 months old. If you have to break some established bonds, you may have to go longer. You will have to decide based on how the training is going.

 

There is someone on this list who got 2 pups at the same time. Perhaps she (ejano/liz) will chime in.

 

Jovi

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I'm curious, why a BC pup? I noticed the reference to children in your original post. How much experience do you have with border collies or how much research about the breed have you done? They can be a problem with children. Mine really doesn't like children, and will nip if the get too close. She was socialized as a pup and has never been abused, she just doesn't like kids, they are like unruly sheep that need to be set straight. ;) Just wondering.

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As someone currently with an 11-week old pup, I can attest ONE pup is exhausting when done right, especially if you're working a full-time job. Getting two would mean less time with your pups individually to the detriment of both. Do yourself and your future puppy a favor and devote your time to just one.

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The ages of your children will make a difference, even with training just one pup. Pups tend to chase and nip and unless you can supervise at all times, you might have some problems between the pup and the children. If they are older children who can assist with training and understand, for example, that running and screaming might elicit a chase/nip response in a pup, then you'll probably be okay.

 

I've raised two littermates together, along with another youngster 6 months older. But I don't have children and I have a pretty structured lifestyle so I was able to make it work. I wouldn't recommend it for someone who also has a household with children.

 

One thing about littermates: not only do you have to be careful about them bonding to one another, but I've also found that they tend to get into sibling spats more often (mine will be 5 in July and they still have spats). Just another thing to consider.

 

J.

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I have two pups from the last litter. I keep them seperate and it is a lot of work. Normally I would only keep one pup from a litter but this litter is very special (Roo x Nan) and I won't be repeating this breeding.

 

I recommend only one pup per litter. I have a set routine here and the dogs know it. The pups learn the rules and are well behaved, however they still are pups.

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Thank you all for the advice. I have trained a BC from a pup before when my children were young and yes, we did address nipping issues, etc. My children are 19, 16, 14, and 12. My boys (16 & 14) are interested in training as well, but my 12 year old daughter wants to explore whether she would rather move into vet/ vet tech mode or work with dogs on a training, grooming, boarding level. I knew I was going to have my hands full, but felt that it would be more beneficial all around if we were each working - knowing how my family works, was a big factor in even considering 2 BC pups.) Even though we did train Tip from a pup and went through obedience classes, Hannah and I want to take these dogs further into a "job" than we took Tip. We do hope to participate in agility or other sport - whatever is suitable for each. I do want to learn as much as I can so that I am even a better 'mom' to these guys than I was to Tip. Because we also homeschool, our schedule is one that allows for change and structure according to the dogs needs as they change. This allows us to work throughout the day and be fairly flexible with our own household. I ordered a copy of "Ruff Love" by Susan Garret and will also look into clicker training. We will be starting classes with Jennifer Crank of Incredipaws in Columbus, OH this September. (As far as rent goes, I would like some - but don't think I'm going to get very far with that biggrin.gif) The pups are really doing well at this point - working on sit/stays, downs, and some recall. If anyone else has any other advice, please share.

 

 

post-12432-029149300 1309968417_thumb.jpg - Pic of Flint and Jazz (still working on the profile pic - says it is too big)

 

 

~Rochelle~

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If you would really like to have two dogs, but want to avoid the pitfalls of having two puppies, or two littermates, at the same time, why not consider adopting one older, adult, and one puppy? If you work with a good rescue, you could probably find an adult bc that has already received basic training (house manners, basic obedience, etc.). A well adjusted adult dog can be a really great roll model for a young pup, too. And I do think that most dogs enjoy the company of other dogs. Also, your kids would be able to begin training (you mentioned one was interested in agility) with an adult dog right away. With a young puppy, they wouldn't really be able to do serious training until it was closer to a year and a half old. You can still do basic training and foundation work, but you can't really do much beyond that because the puppy's body will not be mature enough. I would still suggest getting one dog (I'd start with the adult), give it some time for you and your family to build a nice bond, and then add the puppy. Just my $0.02. :) Oh, and please read this thread (if you haven't already) about getting a border collie: http://www.bordercollie.org/boards/index.php?showtopic=15117

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I am confused. From your post it says you are still thinking about getting two puppies. But your screen name Jazz/Flints mom suggests you already own Jazz and Flint. Plus the picture is of two very adoragle BC puppies named Jazz and Flint. Did you already get the two puppies ??

 

Also seems you are in the Newark, Ohio area. I grew up in suburban Columbus and my family still lives in the area - (mother is probably about a mile from the facility you are considering for training). The facility seems a good facility for agility training but ypu may wish to consider whether you wish to expose the pups to livestock a bit later - maybe arounfd 10 months old. There are a number of very good trainers within a reasonable drive if you wish. Just suggest staying away from all breed or AKC trainers for sheepherding if you decide to try it.

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MagRam, Jazz/Flints is not the OP, Peterblue is. Jazz/Flints does already have two pups and was asking for some suggestions on how to work with them.

 

Yes, I do already own Jazz & Flint. I am new to this forum so I guess I should have started a new topic - sorry for any confusion. Thanks for all of the help and advice.

~Rochelle~

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I am confused. From your post it says you are still thinking about getting two puppies. But your screen name Jazz/Flints mom suggests you already own Jazz and Flint. Plus the picture is of two very adoragle BC puppies named Jazz and Flint. Did you already get the two puppies ??

 

Also seems you are in the Newark, Ohio area. I grew up in suburban Columbus and my family still lives in the area - (mother is probably about a mile from the facility you are considering for training). The facility seems a good facility for agility training but ypu may wish to consider whether you wish to expose the pups to livestock a bit later - maybe arounfd 10 months old. There are a number of very good trainers within a reasonable drive if you wish. Just suggest staying away from all breed or AKC trainers for sheepherding if you decide to try it.

 

I am more interested in the sport or service side of work for the dogs, but am not against looking at livestock training. I will need to research it a bit to see if it would fit our family. I also have read some things that suggest going AKC is not the best for us. We are looking at Incredipaws because they are not just AKC. If you know of other trainers in this area, please let me know. Thanks!

~Rochelle~

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Yes, I do already own Jazz & Flint. I am new to this forum so I guess I should have started a new topic - sorry for any confusion. Thanks for all of the help and advice.

~Rochelle~

 

Sorry - My bad. They are both real cuties BTW

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