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Parasite control...


ejano
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Another question -- parasite control. I've been talking with the Pipestone Vet Clinic which recommends the following products (the wormers basically because they come in the smallest sizes)

 

CDT

Valbazon - external parasites

Ivermectin - internal parasites

 

Thoughts on these products?

 

Thanks,

Liz

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Hi Liz,

 

Here is information about the three products you mentioned:

 

Bar-Vac CD/T

Cl. Perfringens, Types C & D Tetanus Toxoid

Vaccine for immunizing sheep, goats & cattle against tetanus & overeating disease caused by Cl. Perfringens & Types C & D Tetanus Toxoid. Safe for pregnant cows. Inject SQ.

 

IVOMEC® Sheep Drench

Ivermectin 0.08%

 

A liquid wormer administered orally to sheep only. Its convenience, broad-spectrum efficacy and wide therapeutic index make IVOMEC® Sheep Drench is an exceptionally valuable product for parasite control in sheep. Kills gastrointestinal roundworms, lungworms and nasal bots. Administer with standard drenching equipment. Dosage: 3 mL containing 2400 mcg ivermectin treats 26 lb body weight.

 

IVOMEC® Drench for Sheep, which is formulated specifically for sheep, provides a broader spectrum of efficacy than any other sheep parasite control product.

Kills 122 adult and immature stages of gastrointestinal roundworms

Kills all larval stages of nasal bots

Kills adults and immature lungworms

 

 

Valbazen® Broad Spectrum Dewormer

11.36% Albendazole

Oral suspension for use in cattle and sheep. Effective in the removal and control of liver flukes, tapeworms, stomach worms, intestinal worms and lungworms.

 

Key Facts:

One product controls 4 major groups of parasitic worms - tapeworms, stomach worms, lungworms and liver flukes.

Kills inhibited 4th stage Ostertagia (brown stomach worm) larvae, the most important internal parasite of cattle.

Fits strategic deworming programs.

Special drench gun makes administration fast and easy.

 

 

My comments:

 

The first product, CD-T, is a vaccine and is not used for parasite control. The second product, Valbazen, is an oral dewormer that treats internal parasites. The third product, Ivermectin, is also an oral dewormer that treats internal parasites. All of these products are approved for use in sheep, but none of these products is used for external parasite control. Injectable Ivermectin can be used for external parasite control, but it is not approved for use in sheep.

 

Regards,

nancy

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Nancy, thank you.

 

I remembered the T stood for tetanus but my preoccupation with the creepy crawly things led me astray on the other reasons for giving it...

 

Two of the sheep will all ready be vaccinated with CD-T. I need to treat the other ones -- they will be arriving first and be by themselves for about a month - will that be enough time to vaccinate and before the Shetlands arrive. "de bug" both internally and externally All are lambs 3 -4 months, none will have a heavy wool coat yet. The Shetlands will about 2 months old when they arrive.

 

 

I left one product off my original list -- UltraBoss was the product they recommended for external parasite control. If I understood him correctly, it works like a spot on does on dogs.

"Effective against lice, sheep keds and other external parasites. One application persists in hair follicles for up to 14 days. Highly concentrated. 1.5mL per 50# of body weight. One quart with treat over two hundred 150# ewes."

 

Apparently, it has to be applied every two weeks for maximum effectiveness... I don't mind doing that, but is this a good product? I will have just five sheep so arranging for dipping might be overkill but if they need it, we'll do it...practice for when the flock grows.... those sheep keds look ugly - do they transfer to dogs at all?

 

Thanks,

Liz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Liz,

 

Here is information about the three products you mentioned:

 

Bar-Vac CD/T

Cl. Perfringens, Types C & D Tetanus Toxoid

Vaccine for immunizing sheep, goats & cattle against tetanus & overeating disease caused by Cl. Perfringens & Types C & D Tetanus Toxoid. Safe for pregnant cows. Inject SQ.

 

IVOMEC® Sheep Drench

Ivermectin 0.08%

 

A liquid wormer administered orally to sheep only. Its convenience, broad-spectrum efficacy and wide therapeutic index make IVOMEC® Sheep Drench is an exceptionally valuable product for parasite control in sheep. Kills gastrointestinal roundworms, lungworms and nasal bots. Administer with standard drenching equipment. Dosage: 3 mL containing 2400 mcg ivermectin treats 26 lb body weight.

 

IVOMEC® Drench for Sheep, which is formulated specifically for sheep, provides a broader spectrum of efficacy than any other sheep parasite control product.

Kills 122 adult and immature stages of gastrointestinal roundworms

Kills all larval stages of nasal bots

Kills adults and immature lungworms

 

 

Valbazen® Broad Spectrum Dewormer

11.36% Albendazole

Oral suspension for use in cattle and sheep. Effective in the removal and control of liver flukes, tapeworms, stomach worms, intestinal worms and lungworms.

 

Key Facts:

One product controls 4 major groups of parasitic worms - tapeworms, stomach worms, lungworms and liver flukes.

Kills inhibited 4th stage Ostertagia (brown stomach worm) larvae, the most important internal parasite of cattle.

Fits strategic deworming programs.

Special drench gun makes administration fast and easy.

 

 

My comments:

 

The first product, CD-T, is a vaccine and is not used for parasite control. The second product, Valbazen, is an oral dewormer that treats internal parasites. The third product, Ivermectin, is also an oral dewormer that theats internal parasites. All of these products are approved for use in sheep, but none of these products is used for external parasite control. Injectable Ivermectin can be used for external parasite control, but it is not approved for use in sheep.

 

Regards,

nancy

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Hi again Liz,

 

Thanks for the additional information (I have not read your other thread, so I am not aware of your sheep plans).

 

Regarding vaccinating your new sheep (those that haven't previously been vaccinated twice), the CD-T vaccine is to protect sheep from overeating disease and tetanus, and they will require two shots, given 21 to 28 days apart. You could wait until you have all of your lambs before vaccinating the unvaccinated ones, as that would reduce your time spent handling them. However, if you plan to feed concentrates (grain) to the lambs, they should be vaccinated as soon as possible.

 

Regarding treating for internal parasites, hopefully the seller will deworm your new sheep just before leaving their farm. This is a common courtesy practice among sheep producers. If they have not recently been dewormed, then you should do so when they arrive.

 

Regarding external parasites, I truly doubt that treatment will be necessary, unless the lambs you are purchasing have lice. Sheep keds are not a common problem, but occasionally sheep are troubled by biting or sucking lice. If this is the case, Ultra Boss would be a good product to use (probably two applications fourteen days apart are sufficient). It should not be necessary to routinely treat your sheep for external parasites, and the "every two weeks" comment for Ultra Boss pertains to fly control in cattle and horses.

 

Regards,

nancy

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Nancy, thank you. I will make sure the little woolies are dewormed before we take them and vaccinated as well. In fact, I expect the seller will invite me over to do it. I've been learning a bit of sheep husbandry there this winter and helped once with deworming. I'll check them over for lice, etc. as well. I'd like for them to arrive as pest free as possible as there have not been farm animals on this land for quite some time so hopefully the pasture can stay clean.

 

Thanks again,

Liz

 

Hi again Liz,

 

Thanks for the additional information (I have not read your other thread, so I am not aware of your sheep plans).

 

Regarding vaccinating your new sheep (those that haven't previously been vaccinated twice), the CD-T vaccine is to protect sheep from overeating disease and tetanus, and they will require two shots, given 21 to 28 days apart. You could wait until you have all of your lambs before vaccinating the unvaccinated ones, as that would reduce your time spent handling them. However, if you plan to feed concentrates (grain) to the lambs, they should be vaccinated as soon as possible.

 

Regarding treating for internal parasites, hopefully the seller will deworm your new sheep just before leaving their farm. This is a common courtesy practice among sheep producers. If they have not recently been dewormed, then you should do so when they arrive.

 

Regarding external parasites, I truly doubt that treatment will be necessary, unless the lambs you are purchasing have lice. Sheep keds are not a common problem, but occasionally sheep are troubled by biting or sucking lice. If this is the case, Ultra Boss would be a good product to use (probably two applications fourteen days apart are sufficient). It should not be necessary to routinely treat your sheep for external parasites, and the "every two weeks" comment for Ultra Boss pertains to fly control in cattle and horses.

 

Regards,

nancy

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