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Has anyone ever adopted from "Stampers Border Collies?


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Hello, I was just wondering if anyone knows or has adopted a pup from Stampers Border Collies. I know the breeder well and all her dogs and would just love to get in touch with some of the owners of her pups. I have a Border Collie also. You can post here or email me at daisyluv264@yahoo.com

I would love to hear from you!!!

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I am not familar with this breeder but did want to comment that you would not be adopting from them, you'd be purchasing a border collie from them. They are breeders not rescuers.

 

I'm sure others might have more to add.

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This is no offence to the OP but, I dont understand the community as a whole who tell me they adopted or rescued a dog that they paid a breeder for.

 

You would not believe the people who will stick to their story of how they "rescued" an inappropriate dog( too big too much dog) for their family only give it away to a farm @@ Then they are mad that I wont adopt to them.

 

If you havent signed a contract got this dog from a shelter or this dog wasnt found wandering and picked up by you or a friend and money exchanged hands. You bought a dog you didnt adopt and you certainly didnt rescue it from something.

 

I'm sure someone will come back saying they have some horror story but, unless the parents got speutered and this person stopped breeding you still bought a dog and lined their pocket.

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I suspect it goes with the whole "fur kid" idea. You adopt human children, so I guess people who call their dogs fur children might think it ok to say they adopted rather than purchased them. I don't agree though; getting a puppy or dog from a breeder is a business transaction.

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Looking at their website it is clear to me that they are not adopting out dogs - they are selling puppies. Period. If you are or were looking to rescue a dog please be aware that they are breeders, not rescuers.

 

I have never bought a dog from these folks, but the philosophy of these boards is that border collies should be bred for working ability. Though many of the "write ups" of these dogs say things like, so and so dog has it's working ability, they show NOTHING to back up any claims of said working ability... and simply point to international champions in the pedigree.

 

Since the OP is new to the boards, please understand that in order to breed for working ability you have to first.... work the dog... on livestock. The dogs need to be trained up and worked to a high standard, and then proven either on the trial field or a high end working operation. I see no signs that these dogs have done anything along these lines. It appears that any reference to working is simply lip service.

 

Additionally, they appear to also be breeding for colors - showing lilacs and merles.

 

To give you a better understanding of the philosophy of these boards, please click here. To understand more about how to choose a border collie, please click here.

 

Honestly, I would not buy one of these dogs - though I'm sure they're pretty and I'm sure the people who are breeding them are probably nice folks. But I think anyone who breeds should take a really hard look at their breeding program, motivation behind it, and how they are presenting it to prospective buyers. Breeding for anything other than working ability alone brings damage to the breed that we love.

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Fantastic post, Laura. You've hit the perfect (kinder, gentler) tone, while conveying accurate information for this notoriously sensitive topic. Well done!

I'd like to second this - your post was excellent and well-stated, Laura.

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Hi leapoffaith, welcome to the Boards. I'm sorry you got such a rocky reception. I wouldn't be surprised if you are feeling a little bewildered.

 

It's become very common to use the word "adopt" to mean getting a dog from a pound, shelter or rescue organization, and to use the words "buy" or "purchase" when you speak of getting a dog from a breeder. Not everyone uses the words this way -- I see that the breeder you're writing about speaks of their dogs being "adopted," so it's no wonder you used that word here. Some people are very insistent about drawing this distinction, whereas others are less so. From the point of view of someone bringing home a new pet, I don't think buying a pup from a breeder is any more or less of a "business transaction" than adopting a pup from a shelter/rescue. In both cases they intend that the pup will become a loved and permanent member of the family. I thought it was pretty clear from your post that you were not making any claim that you or anyone else had "rescued" a pup from this breeder, or that the breeder was a rescuer.

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Hi leapoffaith, welcome to the Boards. I'm sorry you got such a rocky reception. I wouldn't be surprised if you are feeling a little bewildered.

 

It's become very common to use the word "adopt" to mean getting a dog from a pound, shelter or rescue organization, and to use the words "buy" or "purchase" when you speak of getting a dog from a breeder. Not everyone uses the words this way -- I see that the breeder you're writing about speaks of their dogs being "adopted," so it's no wonder you used that word here. Some people are very insistent about drawing this distinction, whereas others are less so. From the point of view of someone bringing home a new pet, I don't think buying a pup from a breeder is any more or less of a "business transaction" than adopting a pup from a shelter/rescue. In both cases they intend that the pup will become a loved and permanent member of the family. I thought it was pretty clear from your post that you were not making any claim that you or anyone else had "rescued" a pup from this breeder, or that the breeder was a rescuer.

 

Very well said, a nice dose of common sense

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I guess no one has any of the Breeders pups on this Forum, but they have a very nice web site, and she was only using the words the Breeder used in there buying info.

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Well I would guess my beef would be with the breeder confusing their buyers and again I stated I wasnt attacking the op but, making a point that people feel they are adopting or rescuing all the while they are buying from a breeder.

 

I dont claim to have adopted Dal even though I'm his 3rd home. I paid real money for him to an active breeder. Now Genie and Sugar are a different story since I picked Gene up before her delivery at a kill shelter.

 

it wasnt my intension to make the op feel unwelcome but, she directed us to her breeder.

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Sorry if my post caused a stink Leapoffaith. I was thinking more in the line of weather or not you were purchasing a pup or perhaps "adopting" an older dog that has out used it's usefulness in a breeding program.

I guess it kind of irks me when "breeders" (and I am certainly not referring to this one as I have no idea who or what they are) try and adopt out an older dog under the pretense that the person acquiring the dog is adopting or in some cases "rescuing" it.

No reflection on you. I was more trying to clear up an internal issue in my own head :blink: none with you :) .

 

I will second those that said welcome to the boards...and try again, I promise I will reread what I post before posting so I don't cause confusion again.

 

I would also like to ask, what info you are looking for? How the pups have turned out in regards to what? Since you stated that you know the dogs and the person very well.

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I guess no one has any of the Breeders pups on this Forum, but they have a very nice web site, and she was only using the words the Breeder used in there buying info.

 

 

Ok but, after you went to friends of Pep and couldnt find a suitable pup and then you went and bought a half sister to Dally. You knew you werent adopting?

 

Even if this breeder is placing older dogs out into homes it's really culling and not an adoption either. There is a place in Pa that is associated with a breeder who claimed/claims to be a rescue and really she is placing dogs returned to that breeder.

 

Not to drag out the point or make the op feel unwelcome but, it's not nice of that breeder to call anything but, a true rescue situation an adoption. It confuses buyers.

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Years ago Cabbage Patch dolls were all the rage - you didn't buy one for your child. You "adopted" one into your family and they flew off the store shelves. You couldn't "adopt" one for love or money at Christmas...It's obvious that "adopt" is a warm/fuzzy selling point for the market the breeder is serving - which was my assumption even before looking at the website.

 

 

For my part - though we paid fees/prices for all the dogs - my descriptors are different: We "got" Ladybug from the SPCA. Scotty "came to us" through a private rescue. The boys- Robin and Brodie were "bought" or "purchased" from a breeder. I don't use the term "adopt" though I recognize and respect that it is in common use for dogs coming out of SPCA or rescue. It's a personal thing - years ago (around the time the Cabbage Patch dolls first hit the market) a friend who was adopted was struggling with issues surrounding her adoption and expressed both resentment and sadness that she was "adopted" like a doll from the store shelves. Her pain stuck with me so I use the term "adopt" sparingly.

 

@OP -- it's fun to trace canine family lines. I've enjoyed learning more about the dogs in my own boys family tree - they are the first BCs we've owned that were purchased as puppies out of dogs from working lines. Learning more about your own dog's lines and what other dogs in that line are doing is very interesting. If close relatives are performing well in certain venues (e.g herding, agility, flyball), you might look at those possible activities for your dog. You might also uncover some "heads up" information regarding potential health or behavioral problems and foreknowledge is always helpful.

 

What has been especially inspiring for me is to learn a bit more about the breeders/handlers who own and work dogs that share one or more of my boys lines -- if you start following the working BC world, watching the folks that really know what they're doing and their dogs working stock is a real thrill. And you can cheer on the relatives at a trial :).

 

 

Liz

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  • 3 months later...

Hello All! I wanted to comment here on this forum because the initial question here was to find out if any one had ever gotten a border collie puppy from Stampers Border Collies. I am aware that Leapoffaith very much wanted to do some research and talk to other owners who has acquired a puppy from me. I am the owner of Stampers Border Collies and would like very much to clarify why I use the term "adopt". I use this term because I feel when you add a new member to your family it is or should be a huge commitment and each family or person IS making that puppy "THEIR OWN".

 

Here is the meaning of adopt...

 

a·dopt (-dpt)

tr.v. a·dopt·ed, a·dopt·ing, a·dopts

1. To take into one's family through legal means and raise as one's own child.

2.

a. To take and follow (a course of action, for example) by choice or assent: adopt a new technique.

 

 

 

I take great care in the fact that I do not just "sell a puppy" and I go to great lengths to make sure that each one of our border collie puppies are "adopted" into to proper environment for life long active homes! I will not just sell a border collie puppy to anyone who comes to my door with money in hand and often educate those who perhaps would be better off with another breed. Border Collie's are not for everyone and if placed in the wrong environment can become very bored and distructive. I take great care in their proper "adoption" because each one of our pups are very important to us! I do not want any of our puppies to end up in a rescue situation! If our puppies are "adopted" to the right family and owner when they leave us and each family makes the puppy a valued member of their family then it really does not matter if there is any monitary amount paid for them or not.

 

I hope this helps to clarify why at Stampers Border Collies we use the term "adopt" as we wish for each one of our puppies to have families who make them "Their own"! Families who are worthy of the border collie's endless devotion!

 

Thank you all!

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Thank you for explaining your view on why you consider purchasing a pup to be an adoption. Most people that I am aware of, consider a purchase to be a purchase (and it should be a life-long commitment) and to get a dog from rescue or the shelter (or a similar situation) to be an adoption. It's just a common use of the word.

 

Since you have reopened this slightly older topic, would you like to address how you determine that a dog or bitch is suitable to be breeding stock? How do you evaluate and prove your dogs' stockworking abilities? How do you determine which dogs and bitches are likely compatible breeding partners - by their work styles, or other criteria? I don't see anything but occasional comments on your website about your animals and their offspring having anything to do with livestock work.

 

Please read "Read this first" at the top of the index page - that should explain why I am asking these questions, and point out what the philosophy of these boards is with regards to breeding. It is not about pedigree or ancestors (although those play a valuable part, particularly in the closer generations, and with careful proving on stock and breeding decisions) per se but about breeding proven (on stock) dogs and bitches in suitable pairings (and then evaluating the working abilities of offspring to determine the success of the pairing decisions, and make decisions about future pairings).

 

Looking at your "testimonials" and where you advertise your pups, it appears your puppy market is the pet and sport market, rather than the stockworking community, although I see your comments here and there about placing pups on farms, as well as one or two testimonials from people with sheep - where the pups seem to have some useful instincts although they don't appear to be trained to do more than basic taskes with their handler.

 

Looking forward to your input if you would like to share it.

 

(And, no, this is not a set-up or trick question - part of what prompted me to write this is your website comment, "All our puppies inherit the ability to herd and to work." Even the very best and most consistent breeders and trainers of working Border Collies will admit that no breeding is fool-proof; that not every pup will inherit the qualities of the parents (but that good breeding choices increase the likelihood that pups will be well-suited for stockwork); and that the qualities necessary for good stockwork are complex and breedings must be made with great care and consideration of the parents' working abilities (and genetic background) to perpetuate stockworking ability (and all that entails) in the offspring. I'm not seeing anything indicating proving your dogs and bitches on livestock, making matches on anything other than perhaps pedigrees, and evaluating offspring on livestock, but perhaps I'm missing something.

 

And, by evaluating stockworking abilites, I'm not meaning "herds the cat" or "herds the other dogs" or "chases sheep" and other comments that unknowledgeable people make about their dogs, thinking it means they are "great herders".)

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Can you give us more information on your line of border collies? do you work them on livestock to a high standard? Are you aware of the genetics that you are perpetuating in your line of dogs? Are you improving the genetics of these wonderful dogs or are you breeding pretty "new" family members to adopt/sell?

There are lots of breeds out there that are wonderful pets, but our choosen breed has a much higher standard that we as their keepers are responsible for preserving? It is the mission of these boards to promote the preservation of the border collie as a very high quality working breed. The best we can produce. Actually training and working your breeding dogs is the only way you will know what you are adding to our special breed.

As far as the term adopting... it is standard in the dog world (or I feel it should be) that the word means placing a dog that needs a home in a better situation than where it came from, or rescuing a dog out of a bad situation. Not buying or taking an older dog or puppy from its breeder whether its paid for on given without money changing hands. No matter what the popular word of the day is.

JMO

Kristen

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There are some awfully interesting genetics in there. I am very, very interested in knowing what type of work they do for you or your clients. I see for instance a lot of progeny from a sire with fairly classic trial breeding crossed on a really strong maternal line - but with what looks like maybe some random color or farm hitches on the last line, maybe.

 

It would be fascinating to know whether you have refined this outcross line in the next couple of generations. There is a potential treasure there if the physical and temperamental health is sound.

 

Do you raise cattle, sheep, goats? I've noticed people who have the flexibility to experiment with their lines (or start from scratch), generally run largely stocker based operations.

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Here is the meaning of adopt...

 

a·dopt (-dpt)

tr.v. a·dopt·ed, a·dopt·ing, a·dopts

1. To take into one's family through legal means and raise as one's own child.

 

Ok, we're talking *dogs* NOT children.

 

In just a quick glance I see you've had what 5 litters in just over a year? That sure sounds like a business to me. Someone else used to *adopt* out pups and older dogs, makes it sound warm and fuzzy, except they were unsold pups they had bred themselves.

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@ "Borderslove":

You sell puppies for profit, period.

Calling it "adoption" is ridiculous, and a misleading abuse of the dictionary definition of the word.

Your explanation is a sappy sale pitch, nothing else.

This also goes if you were really breeding for working ability, which I seriously doubt.

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