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How much yoghurt to add to kibble


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Brody was very sick prior to christmas, basically did not eat for 3 weeks and what he did got thrown up. Although the vets never decided what was wrong with him, he was on a cocktail of antibiotics for 5 weeks. Well time and the antibiotics did the trick and he is back to his normal weird self BUT he does occasionally still throw up, which got me to thinking his stomach was still not back to normal and thought yoghurt might help to reintroduce all those good bugs that antibiotics killed off.

Does anyone have any suggestions as to how much plain yoghurt to give him or if there is anything else readily available that might also help.

 

As a side note, my vets are 10 miles away and over 2 bridges and did not see another dog with Brodys symptoms, yet in my town at new years I found someone who's dog had had the same symptoms, high fever, throwing up and not eating, and the local animal hospital had seen a number of dogs with similar symptoms. I guess sometimes it pays to go to a very local vet.

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In Arizona, my Beck was also sick early in December, and required antibiotics. Nothing showed up in the blood work or during the exam, other than her neck glands were swollen.

 

A little over a month later, she started showing different symptoms than in December, and we wondered if the infection (or whatever it was) never really cleared up and went to her inner ears. She's on a different type on antibiotic now.

 

Previous to her first round of illness, she had not been around other dogs in quite some time.

 

I read your post and wonder what is going around in the dog community, or are they catching things from us humans?

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Having had 2 dogs with sensitive tummies, my anwer is a bit skewed towards caution. Start w/a heaping Tbs of plain, organic yogurt w/live cultures. Most dogs like the taste, so that shouldn't be a problem. If he tolerates it, then you can up the amount to a couple Tbs at a time.

 

You can also get live cultures in health food stores. Look for a combination of bacteria. I know that some will say to get canine specific stuff, but I used both the stuff I got for humans and some doggy specific brand, (more expensive, natch) and they both worked very nicely.

 

Ruth

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Having had 2 dogs with sensitive tummies, my anwer is a bit skewed towards caution. Start w/a heaping Tbs of plain, organic yogurt w/live cultures. Most dogs like the taste, so that shouldn't be a problem. If he tolerates it, then you can up the amount to a couple Tbs at a time.

That's about what I give.Do use plain (not sweetened) yoghurt and prefer the Casei/Bifidus types to those that have only Acidophilus. We make it by the bucket at home and everyone thrives on it.

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Brody loves yoghurt, in fact he would prefer if I gave him the sweetened fruit flavored variety, but it is best not to discuss what food he shares with my husband at work. I was reading the labels of the plain yoghurt at the supermarket and they just said live cultures. Perhaps when I make it to the large one there might be more choice.

 

Maybe if this becomes a regular thing I should be making my own :)

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Yes, yogurt is good, and as JohnLloydJones has suggested, look for yogurts that have the Bifidus sp. (and may have other species).

 

I will use yogurt, but personally, if I have a sick or recovering dog and want to load my dog up with beneficial bacteria, I look for a probiotic preparation formulated for dogs. I know that FastTrack is one brand, and I am sure there are others. I find that these formulations tend to have several species of beneficial bacteria (Bifidus among them) specifically meant to target the intestine. They are also much more concentrated than yogurt so you don't need as much.

 

I generally keep a syringe or two on hand so I don't have to run out to get it. It tends to have a long shelf life. (The syringe is not a syringe one uses for injection. It is a larger syringe, usually white plastic, and has gradations marked along the tube for measuring the dose.)

 

FWIW, my vet doesn't believe in probiotics - he says that the bacteria don't make it through the acidic environment in the stomach. I disagree with him and continue to use probiotics as necessary.

 

Jovi

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