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Pictures/Info re Mckinney surrendered bc's


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Thanks for the update. I'd been wondering.

 

Poor dogs. It's sad to see how many are "shy" or "fearful," and one is "terrified." No socialization at all, and now they're in a strange, scary place. Also kind of odd to see several retained testicles in the bunch. I wonder if that's an inbreeding thing ... And the heartworm - those dogs have a road ahead. :(

 

Glad the dogs have some hope, though, and are getting good care. They will have a better future!

Cheers ~

 

Gloria

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Also kind of odd to see several retained testicles in the bunch. I wonder if that's an inbreeding thing ...

 

Yes and no. Testicle retention is genetic ... it makes sense that someone who keeps breeding the same dogs with the same problems would see it more often. IOW, the inbreeding would just exacerbate the genetic flaw.

 

Dexter is cryptorchid (both testicles retained). The "Big Hat" that surrendered his pregnant mother to rescue was not interested in learning that his stud was carrying this genetic flaw. A shame.

 

RDM

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In the grand scheme of things a retained testicle isn't as big of a deal as epilepsy, HD, hearing loss, OCD and other diseases that will affect quality of life and working ability of a Border Collie. If a dog has a retained testicle you remove it when they are young and all is well.

 

As a breeder I would want to know, but I wouldn't be overly concerned.

 

Why was a pregnant bitch from supposedly good breeding turned in to rescue in the first place?

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In the grand scheme of things a retained testicle isn't as big of a deal as epilepsy, HD, hearing loss, OCD and other diseases that will affect quality of life and working ability of a Border Collie. If a dog has a retained testicle you remove it when they are young and all is well.

 

Sure, unless you are one of those people who bought a pup from a breeding you like with the hope of breeding it one day if it performs well, so intended to leave him intact. Or if you are one of those stockdog people who believe that a neutered male doesn't work as well as an intact one ... but leave a male with retained testicles intact and he's a heck of a lot more likely to get cancer. And of course, the cost to neuter a dog with retained testicles is significantly higher than a regular neuter. My vet's quoted me something in the $600 range to neuter Dex. I would think it would be important in many respects.

 

Why was a pregnant bitch from supposedly good breeding turned in to rescue in the first place?

 

Not something I'm prepared to discuss on a public board, sorry. No supposedly about it though.

 

 

RDM

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BCRTx has a facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/group.php?gid=51543717422 that also has updated photos and information on all the dogs. They have all made progress but have a long way to go. They are all in fabulous foster homes who are working together to share ideas on what's worked and not working. We've had a great response from other groups who have dealt with dogs from similar situations and they've been an invaluable resource.

 

 

 

 

Katrena

BCRTx

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I was given a pup with an overbite, who turned out to also have a retained testicle and a digestive disorder. I noticed that very shortly after he was placed with me and the breeder was aware of two of the three issues, he disappeared from her website. No doubt sold on to be used as a stud dog somewhere else, and I really doubt the next owner was aware, but perhaps I'm being cynical.

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RDM, I am not saying that crypts should be ignored as a non problem, but that they are less concerning to me than a dog with a disease such as epilepsy. How much it costs to remove the hidden testicle depends on where it is located. Your vet probably quoted you a worse case scenario surgery that would require a long incision and exploring the entire abdomen. That doesn't happen very often.

 

The only way to insure that you only produce 100% healthy puppies without a single genetic defect is to never breed a single litter. This is something that non breeders rarely understand very well.

 

Sue, I bet you are dead right about your dog's sire.

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