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Our Cora, a 2 year female old rescue, constantly wants to jump up when she approaches us. For a male owner this is a painful style of greeting...we ignore the behavior...then praise when she sits or doesn't jump...but after 4 weeks of trying we are 50% at best....Is there anything we can do to stop her jumping???? we know for a fact her previous owner taught her to hug...mimicing jumping....we try to discourage both...any help would be appreciated...thanks...Greg

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Dear Doggers,

 

I raise my knee. This is an imperfect remedy because the dog learns to not jump up on you but has no reason not to jump up on softer folk. I was amused last weekend watching my June who is the Madonna of Sheepdogs - her major talent is being noticed. It has been a while since June was amongst sheepdoggers who were unimpressed by her ploys. She gave up after a couple unsatisfactory tries.

 

Donald McCaig

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Like Mr. McCaig, I've always raised my knee, too.

 

Whisper used to jump up. Since she is very food motivated, I used treats to step her behavior down from jumping up on people to racing for the couch and leaping on it. First, when someone came to the house, I instructed them on how to behave towards her before they walked in the house: do not pet her until she sits (even now, if it is someone she does not know, I will tell them to ignore her until she offers a paw, her signal that they're okay. She tends towards fear agression, and I don't want anyone nipped). Once Whisper sat down, she got a treat and lots of petting.

 

Of course, now when anyone comes into the house, she thinks she gets a biscuit. She will also hover at the door until the biscuit is forthcoming. Since I did not like that behavior, I moved on to the next step: get on the couch. Now when someone comes to the house, she meets them at the door, gets her pats (after sitting; I insist on that), then races for the couch (fast is good, but lightning speed is better, in Whisper's world).

 

 

 

 

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From what I read in your other post, she sounds like she is lacking in confidence and has some fear issues. Personally, I would not use my knee.

 

You've had her for 4 weeks. Give her some time and be 100% consistent with whatever method you choose. I've had success with just turning away and ignoring the dog until it stops jumping, rewarding with food or praise for all 4 on the floor. I make my dogs sit instead of just having all 4 on the floor. If it's a huge issue, then maybe you could have her leashed with one person's foot on the leash so that she can not jump and then have a second person repeatedly approaching her and rewarding her for not jumping.

 

Again, being 100% consistent with whatever method you choose. No jumping means no jumping always. I have one friend who encourages Riley to jump on her when they meet and it's been a chore. She knows better too. I cut her some slack since she's the one who rescued him, but it's made the training process a lot slower.

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Sounds like you've inadvertently created a behavior chain...she jumps up-> you ignore-> she then she sits-> you praise. So she thinks the the jump up is the first part of the behavior that gets praise

 

I do several things to work on jumping up.

 

1. I make sitting highly rewarding. Especially when there are exciting tantalizing things to try & lure said dog out of the sit.

 

2. I'd ask the dog to sit as I saw it was approaching & then reward that (effectively breaking the chain).

 

3. After working on 1 & 2 I would make sure that the dog knew it was displeasing me by jumping up.

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Dew has a command..."no feet" she loves to "pet" you and also loves a good hug. Which was darling when she was little, not so much anymore unless you really love her and want her to squeeze you around the neck. Which I will admit I do.

So she learned a command which is "no feet". It's not 100% but before meeting a new person or even an old friend I can remind her that no feet are allowed.

Now she has a new trick. She turns herself around and will lean into you with her back while standing on her back feet. Hence jumping up with "no feet".

It's quite funny, you can see her setting it up in her mind and body. If I don't want it to happen I can say a soft no and that usually works. New people are quite amazed that she can "jump" on them with out getting them dirty or putting her feet on them.

 

She is my only jumper. She was tiny and cute so it was our mistake for letting it happen in the first place. So we suffer the consquenses with a smile.

 

She's also a pretty smart cookie, unless someone is interested in her she usually won't jump on them. She has been severely corrected by someone who did NOT want any jumpers(not me but another dog person). She remembers well and doesn't want her "feeling's or herself hurt again.

 

I admit I love my little jumper but have resigned myself that I won't let another puppy learn this behavior that isn't half as cute when they are adults.

 

Mick is not a jumper of anything, including people or furniture (he gets on a couch or chair 1 foot at a time) but he is still exuberant when meeting new friends (people not dogs) he dances, wiggles and looks just like he's going to jump on you all over. I'm constantly telling people he doesn't jump and to go ahead and pet him, I promise he won't jump. Until they are there for a few minutes they stand ready to fend off the "jumper" that never happens.

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I've found that catching Odin before he jumps up, but when he's already thinking about it worked best for him. I just give a uh-uh and that seems to help a lot. Of course lots of attention when it works and he sits is the flip side of the coin. It took some time too.

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I teach "up up", which means "paws up/jump up" and "off" as two separate cues - outside of the context where the dog would jump on his or her own. Once the dog knows that, I practice when the dog is inclined to jump up until the dog is fluent when excited. Then if I want paws off, I cue "off" when I see the dog coming. If I want a hug, I cue "up up" and have a party. It's not everyone's preference, but I love having the option.

 

I also teach "sit for petting", and I frequently get down at my dog's level for love fests, so it's not always the same every time.

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word of caution, the knee can hit wrong and bust a diaphram. I have seen this happen and it is NOT a good situation.

 

Teaching the dog to 'sit' before jumping is a good solution. It will take time as the dog has learned a bad habit, and consistancy works.

 

Fact is, YOU KNOW the dog will jump up, an ounce of prevention.....

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