Jump to content
BC Boards

driven well with hand pump


ejano
 Share

Recommended Posts

We are converting part of a 19th century horse barn for sheep. The other barns had hand dug wells in them, ranging from 10 to 20 feet deep and always had fresh water. The horse barn is the only one that does not have a well inside it, but the only one we have access to.

 

We are thinking of putting a driven well in it as the water table in the area is so high. (There is room to locate the well away from the sheep pens and paddock to avoid runoff) We'll need to use a hand pump as there is no electricity in the barn. Does anyone have experience with hand pumps - where is the water stored? Will the water freeze in the pump or well in the barn in the winter here in NE PA when the temps outside are below freezing?

 

Thanks

 

Liz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a well with a hand pump - came with the place. There is a wheel where a chain with rubber stoppers goes around. The chain goes down into the well and brings water up a pipe as you turn the handle, the stoppers simply catch the water and there you go. I have never had it freeze. If the chain breaks it is a pain in the a** because you have to 'fish' the chain out of the well but other than that it is pretty cool. I can email you a photo but I do not know how to put it here.

 

Denice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a well with a hand pump - came with the place. There is a wheel where a chain with rubber stoppers goes around. The chain goes down into the well and brings water up a pipe as you turn the handle, the stoppers simply catch the water and there you go. I have never had it freeze. If the chain breaks it is a pain in the a** because you have to 'fish' the chain out of the well but other than that it is pretty cool. I can email you a photo but I do not know how to put it here.

 

Denice

 

I'd love to see it -- ejanoski@gmail.com is my email address.

 

We found a pitcher style pump made in Canada called the "Oasis non freezing shallow well pump" for $326.00. The water drains back down into the cylinder. This seems a more economical choice than the Buffalo pumps which price out at $800 or more - seems to be the same style but is made of "thermoplastics, ABS and PVC," -- not metal, which accounts for the price difference, apparently.

 

Does anyone have any experience with this type of pump?

 

 

A pitcher pump (around $100) would apparently freeze unless drained and primed every time?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Old style hand pumps do need to be primed every time, but if you have good tight leathers it doesn't take more than a couple of cups to do the job. The water drains down into the well each time you stop pumping.

 

Bill, your weather is about the same as ours...can you recommend a particular type -- from what I was reading, the inexpensive pitcher pumps seem to hold the water above ground and would freeze. If it would drain back into the well, it would work fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

You can save a lot of money by buying one from a flea market, yard sale, or antique shop. It would add to the ambiance of the place being old. I got a "sink" one, designed for use IN the house, and it sits on my well cover (so I bend over to use it... no big deal). There are taller ones, and ones designed for all-year use.

 

I got one for $30 from a antique shop (the type where people consign in bays). It would not prime... and I found the suction wasn't there. Upon taking it apart (simple to do,unless the bolt is rusted and it breaks), I saw the only non-metal part was worn out (there is a base seal too). Come to find out, it is called a "leather cup". (you won't have the problem if you buy new. Tractor Supply Company has them for a lot less than Lehman Bro's, which is very expensive). And there is always online/ebay if you don't want to go old and re-build.

 

BTW, old and new look the same, but the inners are cheaper in the new.

 

I ordered one online...it was about $6 and $9 total to my door. I also got the leather bottom seal that goes between the base and the pump assy. My sink hand pump (it's about 16" tall, versus the tall ones of about 3 feet) needs priming after a few days, and it doesn't take much water at all (1/2 a cup is enough). I just leave a small tin can (was of corn) next to the pump, and after using it to prime top it off again.

 

I used PVC tubing to make the pump reach the water, but I've seen some use plastic tubing (its more expensive, but also more flexible). I did remove my pump for the winter as I do not need the water (its by what is now a busy road and odds are the water is contaminated, so I use it for watering plants, etc, but not drinking.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

You can save a lot of money by buying one from a flea market, yard sale, or antique shop. It would add to the ambiance of the place being old. I got a "sink" one, designed for use IN the house, and it sits on my well cover (so I bend over to use it... no big deal). There are taller ones, and ones designed for all-year use.

 

I got one for $30 from a antique shop (the type where people consign in bays). It would not prime... and I found the suction wasn't there. Upon taking it apart (simple to do,unless the bolt is rusted and it breaks), I saw the only non-metal part was worn out (there is a base seal too). Come to find out, it is called a "leather cup". (you won't have the problem if you buy new. Tractor Supply Company has them for a lot less than Lehman Bro's, which is very expensive). And there is always online/ebay if you don't want to go old and re-build.

 

BTW, old and new look the same, but the inners are cheaper in the new.

 

I ordered one online...it was about $6 and $9 total to my door. I also got the leather bottom seal that goes between the base and the pump assy. My sink hand pump (it's about 16" tall, versus the tall ones of about 3 feet) needs priming after a few days, and it doesn't take much water at all (1/2 a cup is enough). I just leave a small tin can (was of corn) next to the pump, and after using it to prime top it off again.

 

I used PVC tubing to make the pump reach the water, but I've seen some use plastic tubing (its more expensive, but also more flexible). I did remove my pump for the winter as I do not need the water (its by what is now a busy road and odds are the water is contaminated, so I use it for watering plants, etc, but not drinking.

 

Mark

Mark,

just saw this post - thanks for the helpful advice, especially about replacing leathers as a friend recently found a pitcher pump in her garage that she is willing to donate to the cause so that we may test the theory of pumping water from the old milk house down to the horse barn before driving a point in the ground. We will be testing the water (as like yours), the old milk house is located near the road - the well is about 30 feet deep so we'll see how it all works.

 

Ambiance...yeah, there's a lot of ambiance on the old home place :).

 

Liz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...