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More on the Missouri Puppy Mill Law


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http://voices.kansascity.com/entries/vote-yes-prop-b-protect-dogs-missouri/

 

I also read an aritcle from the Moberly paper. They stated that one of the bigwigs of the cattle industry was against the proposition. But his argument seemed to be that he would vote against it simply because the HSUS was behind it. And the HSUS was a danger to the agricultural community.

 

I have read recently that the HSUS has been buying stock in companies so that they can increase their ability to demand more humane practices. One example was Butterball where they are protesting the absolutely awful means they use to kill the turkeys. After reading the description I will never buy another Butterball Turkey.

 

But what do you expect from an organization called "The Humane Society?" I don't think it should surprise anyone that they are fighting for more humane treatment of all animals.

 

I noticed another kind of strange thing. There was a big discussion on another really popular board about a man who received an 8 year sentence for decapitating his dog with a chain saw. There were some people who reacted with "the guy should be decapitated with a chainsaw." But, oddly, there were more responses stating "why get all upset about this when every day we kill thousands of head of cattle by shooting metal screws into their heads. What's the big deal? What's the difference."

 

I do think the Puppy Mill Law will pass. Whether it will make one iota of difference remains to be seen. Greed always seems to find a way around the regulations.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yeah, I saw that on the other board, too. My take on it, is that killing cattle that way is more humane than killing a dog with a chain saw. The dog had allegedly bitten a kid. I could understand if he shot the dog, but to me, the chainsaw was pretty pathologically twisted. I have no problem seeing him removed from society for awhile. Normal people do not take a chainsaw to a dog, regardless of what the dog did.

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I noticed another kind of strange thing. There was a big discussion on another really popular board about a man who received an 8 year sentence for decapitating his dog with a chain saw. There were some people who reacted with "the guy should be decapitated with a chainsaw." But, oddly, there were more responses stating "why get all upset about this when every day we kill thousands of head of cattle by shooting metal screws into their heads. What's the big deal? What's the difference."

 

Okay, first of all, decapitation is more inhumane than stunning. Studies have shown (in smaller animals- so may be even longer in larger animals like dogs) that consciousness remains (therefore pain/fear) for up to 13 seconds after the spine is severed. That is a long time- not to mention the time it must've taken to get to the spinal cord. Anyone who does this, as NJ said, is a real sicko & needs to be removed from society for a while along with help for anger management.

 

I have to LOL at the screw comment. Sounds like someone doesn't have a clue what they are talking about. Slaughter of cattle is done with a Captive Bolt gun. According to Temple Grandin

A captive bolt stunning gun kills the animal and reduces it instantly unconscious without causing pain

It doesn't actually shoot screws into the animal's heads though even if it did it would be more humane that decapitation with a chain saw.

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I think they are both awful.

 

But the deal with the chainsaw is just plain incoceivable to me. I think it said he meant to cut the dog's throat and that didn't work.

 

Gees!

 

Yeah, the guy had apparently tried to use a knife, failed, and cracked out the chainsaw. Personally, I think dogs should be euthed by a vet under most circumstances. I got pissy with the one poster on that thread, who said just to dump the dog at the pound and let them do it.

 

Also, it didn't seem the kid it bit needed any medical attention, which makes me wonder if they dog was just playing too rough or something. I mean, I've been bitten by both of mine by accident. Mick put a pretty bad hole by my thumb and Sinead gave me a REALLY nasty bruise on my forearm. Both were 100% by accident. I actually felt bad for Sinead when it happened, because the second her teeth closed on my arm, she let go and ran into the shed like I was gonna beat her. I had to coax her out. She was all shaking when I finally got her out.

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Yeah, the guy had apparently tried to use a knife, failed, and cracked out the chainsaw. Personally, I think dogs should be euthed by a vet under most circumstances. I got pissy with the one poster on that thread, who said just to dump the dog at the pound and let them do it.

 

Also, it didn't seem the kid it bit needed any medical attention, which makes me wonder if they dog was just playing too rough or something. I mean, I've been bitten by both of mine by accident. Mick put a pretty bad hole by my thumb and Sinead gave me a REALLY nasty bruise on my forearm. Both were 100% by accident. I actually felt bad for Sinead when it happened, because the second her teeth closed on my arm, she let go and ran into the shed like I was gonna beat her. I had to coax her out. She was all shaking when I finally got her out.

 

100% agree. When a dog intends to do serious harm, they will have no trouble inflicting that harm. Pilot gave me a nasty bite at the dog park when I was holding him by the collar. This was before I knew about his leash aggression. Another dog approached him as we were going out the exit and I should have let go of his collar. Instead, I held on, his "fight or flight" response kicked in, and he lunged at the dog behind him. My hand was in the way and he gave me an extra hard chomp on my thumb and index finger. If I hadn't been twisting my hand to hold his collar, I would have needed stitches. Instead of yelling at him though, I calmly put him in the car and bandaged my hand- an important lesson learned. I would bet a significant amount of money that the child the dog bit was at fault.

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  • 1 year later...

100% agree. When a dog intends to do serious harm, they will have no trouble inflicting that harm.

 

Definitely.

Little Terrier was stressed out anyway, and hates getting her hair cut. It was the last day I'd be able to do that job for about a week, and she needed it done. So I called her and sat her down to cut her hair. She came very reluctantly, and just sat there getting absolutely goggle-eyed while I tried to get it over as quickly as possible. She half-heartedly escaped and went to hide, I called her back and started again. After a few minutes she reached over and put her teeth on my arm, and held them there. No bite, no pain, no bruise, no intention to hurt. But I would swear that it was a little reminder: "I could do this, I could bite you... but I choose not to."

 

I've seen the same as a warning to other dogs, or a loud, scary-looking snarl and snap. Could be the dog did one of those to the kid.

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Or simply: "please stop...I've asked you in other ways and you didn't get the message."

 

Exactly.

Edit: I did stop, I went and pulled out a ball for a few minutes. There was a moment of "Hang on, this is a little dog who generally sits down quietly in front of you and turns over so you can do the other side, who tolerates it even though she has no idea why. Sometimes it's a bad day, so she gets stressed and just asks you nicely and repeatedly to stop. Would you do that in her shoes? Or would you bite?" I think dogs are expected to have much more patience than humans. A human who beats their dog once probably won't have to pay for it. A dog who snaps at or bites someone once could end up in very deep trouble (as this one did). Weird considering which one has the bigger brain.

 

 

But it's one of those funny things you never think about- every dog has the capacity to bite, and most have had once or twice in their life where they had the motivation, and yet so few do. I bet that guy's dog never bit him, and god knows what he'd done to it previously.

 

 

I was reading a Terry Pratchett book yesterday which reminded me of the chainsaw story: a story of how a fellow cut off the back legs of his dog with an axe for growling at him. People were horrified, but it was the man's dog and what can you do? But the local ruler sent the police out to search his house, because someone who could do that to a dog could do other things.

I've been told by a social worker that animal abuse is a huge red flag for abuse to other family members, and that it's very important to report it for that reason. You see the cattle starving outside, but you might not see the elderly mother starving inside.

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