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Do you think it's more useful to purchase property with pre-established pastures or to be able to set up your own pastures by turning existing meadow into pasture? For the sake of argument, let's assume that the pre-established pastures don't have adequate fencing for sheep, but do have some fencing in place. Also, for the sake of argument, assume that both properties are roughly the same size and price.

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Actually a tough question. Renovating moderately ok fence lines is less costly; however ifyou have to do a lot of work to them it is almost easier to do new fences;

 

I'd just do perimeter and subdivide with netting

 

Ideally i'd like to have bought someone elses place with beautiful fences set up just for sheep, in pastures that are immaculate...and a 25-30 acre field fenced for trialling....

 

cynthia

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Do you think it's more useful to purchase property with pre-established pastures or to be able to set up your own pastures by turning existing meadow into pasture? For the sake of argument, let's assume that the pre-established pastures don't have adequate fencing for sheep, but do have some fencing in place. Also, for the sake of argument, assume that both properties are roughly the same size and price.

 

1. Are the t-posts in good shape or will someone have to redo or put in new ones for the existing fence?

 

2. What has been grazed on the existing pasture?

 

3. Has the existing pasture been cared for? Is it full of good grass or junk grass? The ag extension person will be able to tell you if you bring samples.

 

4. Take soil samples and have your local ag extension service analyse the soil. Lord knows, I didn't. If you're being thorough, however, it's a good idea.

 

5. Write to Mike Neary at Purdue and ask. He is bound to know.

 

Penny

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Both Cynthia and Penny have made good points. The condition of the existing pasture is important. For me shape is important too, as I would prefer to do like Cynthia suggested and perimeter fence and then subdivide by using electronetn (so I would prefer a more regular shape--square, rectangle, triangle--vs. some odd shape, especially something long and narrow). Some existing pastures can be in pretty poor shape and require a great deal of input to make it useful as pasture. That said, a meadow might be beautiful, but might also be full of stuff sheep aren't particularly interested in eating.

 

Water access is another important consideration.

 

J.

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If the existing fence line is full of scrub and crap trees putting up fence line where there wasn't any (in a clear field) is easier than replacing an existing fence line and can be easier than patching an existing fence line. It all depends. However, access to water trumps almost everything.

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