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I just had people show up 30 mins late to adopt. I gave them 10 choices of Pure bred border collies and high mixes. Most though are smooth.

 

Currently we are really high in females from puppy age up to young.

 

 

They decided that the pure bred rough coat was the only one who tripped thier trigger. Alright.

 

The reasons they like her is

 

1 She has good herding instict. In honest this dog herds other dogs and is very rude. I told them so. I also took the time in explaining why and where this could get their dog in trouble. Husband tuned me out.

 

I wait another 30 mins while they walk the dog who was perfectly well behaved on walks.

 

The reason to reject her is she goes into a down stay when cars pass. They felt she didnt have the good energy. Their old dog leaped at passing cars. WTF.

 

 

I spent an hour + to find out that the people want a nutt ball of a dog even though they arent into any sport and really need a companion dog.

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At least you got them figured out (if you can call it that - they are hard to understand) before they got a dog. At least before they got a dog from you.

 

Some people.

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Could be time to fine-tune the pre-screening process to weed out the obvious no-adopts, huh?

 

Maybe, but even with a (in my opinion) good match-making process I still get the occasional odd ball person who is an obvious mis-match for my fosters. People say one thing when they request to see a dog but another thing when they evaluate the dog. I have only had one family that I would absolutely not let a foster of mine go to, so I think our process is working fairly well.

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What do you do when you know that a dog is absolutely wrong for a person (or family)? Can you refuse to allow them to take the dog?

(ETA - the mismatch is in terms of personality, not necessarily that the person lacks the capability to adequately care for the dog.)

 

Liz

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Oh. my. word. some people - sheesh!

 

 

That's what made me nuts yesterday. They only wanted a dog with what is considered truly bad behaviors like they were necessary. The dog is a stunner in looks and she was so affectionate with the people. It's sounds like their Previous Border collie was an ass.

 

Now that I'm sitting here I should have brought them the yellow aussie mix dog we have that made me chase her for 20 mins the other day when she got out the fence.

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We have friends who wear their Golden Retriever's bad behavior like a badge of honor...she's got a darling personality but she's h-- on wheels...you can't even pull in their driveway because she jumps all over the car...she just put a deep gouge into the door of another friend's brand new right off the showroom floor expensive car. They love her just the way she is. But they love our dogs because they behave. Go figure.

 

Liz

 

That's what made me nuts yesterday. They only wanted a dog with what is considered truly bad behaviors like they were necessary. The dog is a stunner in looks and she was so affectionate with the people. It's sounds like their Previous Border collie was an ass.

 

Now that I'm sitting here I should have brought them the yellow aussie mix dog we have that made me chase her for 20 mins the other day when she got out the fence.

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What do you do when you know that a dog is absolutely wrong for a person (or family)? Can you refuse to allow them to take the dog?

(ETA - the mismatch is in terms of personality, not necessarily that the person lacks the capability to adequately care for the dog.)

 

Liz

 

Absolutely, the rescue should refuse to allow anyone to adopt a dog that is not a good match. The rescues I work with do this all the time. Of course, it won't make the potential adopters happy, but it's not all about them to begin with, which is why good rescues aren't "first come, first served". It's about which dog and which people are a good fit for each other. Hopefully pre-adoption screening and interviews will keep this from happening at the point when the people are meeting the dog, though.

 

As for the original post, yeah, those people are mis-guided for sure! :rolleyes:

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Absolutely, the rescue should refuse to allow anyone to adopt a dog that is not a good match. The rescues I work with do this all the time. Of course, it won't make the potential adopters happy, but it's not all about them to begin with, which is why good rescues aren't "first come, first served". It's about which dog and which people are a good fit for each other. Hopefully pre-adoption screening and interviews will keep this from happening at the point when the people are meeting the dog, though.

 

As for the original post, yeah, those people are mis-guided for sure! :rolleyes:

 

Yes beleive it or not this couple still were trying to adopt our dog but, she had to be high energy high play.

 

Now we talked to them over and over but, We really didnt realize what they were meaning before the visit. We thought they were talking average dog. She wrestles with the other dogs Runs the full acre over and over. They were asking qestions like does she play ball. So you say no you could teach her. I'll explain how.

 

This time we clearly said this isnt your dog because We had met them.

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I agree with another responder that the rescue should work FOR the dog first - not to make the adopter happy.

 

Case in point: I found a hunting hound wandering our property last December. She was skinny, there was snow on the ground and into the teens at night. When I asked around, my neighbors said that they had seen her around for a week or so. I took her in and was able to place her with a local no-kill rescue after 3 weeks when an opening became available. (I was not in the position to add a 3rd dog and unfortunately, my male dog attacked her once - and I did not feel like dealing with that issue. Also, I did not think it fair to this extremely submissive dog to have to be in the company of my male while I dealt with behavior modification for his behavior - which may or may not have worked.)

 

After a few months, the rescue placed her. Yay! Unfortunately the placement did not work out - the rescue required the adopter to return the dog! And once I heard the story, I probably have to agree with the rescue. They have a strict home visit policy before and AFTER the adoption. When they visited the home 2 weeks AFTER adoption, the dog had lost weight and her demeanor had changed - and not for the better. The rescue worker confessed she had to think about it overnight and realized that this was not the best situation for the DOG. Apparently, the dog ran! to the van when she was picked up from her adopted home. The adopter was not pleased since she did not return the medical records. (which is why I learned the story since they called me up to find out if I still had her medical records since I had her vetted.)

 

I applaud the rescuers who have to deal with all sorts of situations and human foibles. They have to make their best call - and hopefully that call will be in the best interests of the dog, not just the adopter.

 

Jovi

What do you do when you know that a dog is absolutely wrong for a person (or family)? Can you refuse to allow them to take the dog?

(ETA - the mismatch is in terms of personality, not necessarily that the person lacks the capability to adequately care for the dog.)

 

Liz

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I agree with another responder that the rescue should work FOR the dog first - not to make the adopter happy.

 

Case in point: I found a hunting hound wandering our property last December. She was skinny, there was snow on the ground and into the teens at night. When I asked around, my neighbors said that they had seen her around for a week or so. I took her in and was able to place her with a local no-kill rescue after 3 weeks when an opening became available. (I was not in the position to add a 3rd dog and unfortunately, my male dog attacked her once - and I did not feel like dealing with that issue. Also, I did not think it fair to this extremely submissive dog to have to be in the company of my male while I dealt with behavior modification for his behavior - which may or may not have worked.)

 

After a few months, the rescue placed her. Yay! Unfortunately the placement did not work out - the rescue required the adopter to return the dog! And once I heard the story, I probably have to agree with the rescue. They have a strict home visit policy before and AFTER the adoption. When they visited the home 2 weeks AFTER adoption, the dog had lost weight and her demeanor had changed - and not for the better. The rescue worker confessed she had to think about it overnight and realized that this was not the best situation for the DOG. Apparently, the dog ran! to the van when she was picked up from her adopted home. The adopter was not pleased since she did not return the medical records. (which is why I learned the story since they called me up to find out if I still had her medical records since I had her vetted.)

 

I applaud the rescuers who have to deal with all sorts of situations and human foibles. They have to make their best call - and hopefully that call will be in the best interests of the dog, not just the adopter.

 

Jovi

 

That's a tough one. Good on them! We have it right in our contract that we reserve the right to visit at any time after adoption and take the dog back if it's not being cared for properly. We also do follow-up calls 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after adoption. Unfortunately most people will either not call you back if they are having problems or they will flat out lie to you until the issue has spiraled out of control and they want nothing to do with the dog. Typically at 1.5 yrs to 2 yrs. But that's an entirely different topic! (and it doesn't actually happen that often, but it's still frustrating)

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