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So i'm considering getting a 2nd Dog... Advice Please...


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Hi All. Ive not posted in quite a while but have been hiding in the shaddows reading away! :D

 

So, heres how it is. Ollie is now 4 years old. We (whole family) have been thinking about getting a new addition for about a year. Originally we would have loved anothe BC, but due to the amount of space this has ben ruled out. So we have been looking at smaller breeds, and are pretty sold on Jack Russells. They like Collies have lots of energy to burn, so we thought the newbie would make a good companion for Ollie. We will be getting a pup, as i work looking after children in my home, and it make everyone feel more secure if they know where the dogs have been brought up. So like i said we have been thinking about it for a looong time, and have now decided that the time is right and we are ready for another waggy tail to join the family. I should add that ollie is my first dog, so i do not have experience with multipul dog households.

 

So here are my questions... Should i get Male or Female ( i would prefere a male, but have read that 2 males in same house is bad idea??)

Is the Jack Russell a good match for my lovely BC?? ( should also add that Ollie is pretty submissive)

Ermm, so actually i dont have as many questions now i'm writing this, but all advice appreciated!

 

Thankyou! :rolleyes:

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I don't know alot about Jack Russells so maybe others will chime in. Ollie is your first dog and I don't know how old he was when you got him, but puppies are alot of work and there is no guarantee how they will turn out. I know if I needed a dog that had certain personality characteristics, especially if I were watching young children, I'd probably check out rescue. Have you looked into that? I was curious so I looked up Jack Russell Terrier rescue in the UK. Most of the dogs were not good with other dogs and/or children. That was a bit scary. There was only one that sounded perfect. Her name is Tessa and she sounds like a doll.

 

http://www.jack-russell-terrier.co.uk/rescue-dogs/item/1451

 

Good luck!

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I don't know alot about Jack Russells so maybe others will chime in. Ollie is your first dog and I don't know how old he was when you got him, but puppies are alot of work and there is no guarantee how they will turn out. I know if I needed a dog that had certain personality characteristics, especially if I were watching young children, I'd probably check out rescue. Have you looked into that? I was curious so I looked up Jack Russell Terrier rescue in the UK. Most of the dogs were not good with other dogs and/or children. That was a bit scary. There was only one that sounded perfect. Her name is Tessa and she sounds like a doll.

 

http://www.jack-russell-terrier.co.uk/rescue-dogs/item/1451

 

Good luck!

 

 

Thankyou for your input :D The Jack Russell Breed is an idea that wew have been throwing around, but we are by no means decided. If anyone can recommend good small breeds that go well with a collie i'd love to hear. I also do believe that although dogs can have certain charictaristics, how the dog turns out depends on how it is brought up, and how it is trained. Obviously though, as you say all the facts have to be looked into. As for Ollie, i have had him since he was 5 weeks ( :rolleyes: ) old! There was a sudden illness in the family that i got him from and they were unable to care for the pups properly. he gave me a run for my money in puppyhood but i survived to tell the tale! :D

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Not a JR in your circumstances.

Mine is brilliant with children under normal circumstances but even he will nip if over excited and children playing can be very exciting indeed.

No malice in it, just hard wired.

 

You might be prepared to take the risk with your own children as you've a better chance of training them how to act around dogs but other people's children are a different matter.

 

Don't get hung up on a particular breed. In your situation I would always go for an adult rescue dog know to be good with children because it has been fostered with them. Even with a pup you don't know what it will be like as an adult. In the current economic climate rescues cannot take all the wonderful family dogs whose families need to give them up simply because of a change in circumstances.

 

This is a good place to start -

 

http://www.dogpages.org.uk

 

Be aware though that some rescues are more strict than others about rehoming with children. If met with a No, don't give up - they aren't all the same.

 

Pam

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Or what about a Corgi? They are such sweet dogs and have a similar drive to a border collie.

 

I was looking for something similar. I wanted a smaller dog. (smaller than the german shepherds I've been raised with) But not an ankle biter.

My list was,

Corgi

Mini Aussie

Small Border Collie (lol Obviously what I found... though I guess he's not small for the breed. 36lbs... but small for what I've owned)

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Or what about a Corgi? They are such sweet dogs and have a similar drive to a border collie.

 

Your corgis must be very different from ours over here. :rolleyes:

Occasionally you get the odd lively one with but those tend to be the ones that are most likely to nip, as the breed was created to do.

Of course the fact that they are most often owned by elderly people who over feed and under exercise them doesn't help the breed image.

 

Pam

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Your corgis must be very different from ours over here. :rolleyes:

Occasionally you get the odd lively one with but those tend to be the ones that are most likely to nip, as the breed was created to do.

Of course the fact that they are most often owned by elderly people who over feed and under exercise them doesn't help the breed image.

 

Pam

 

 

Lol... I've known a few. But the ones I knew werent nippers. I guess I see jacks as more likely to nip than corgis.

 

I've not owned one though...

 

eta-a couple of the ones I knew also did agility. A couple were barn/family dogs.

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I will add in my .02 and say an adult rescue. I knew I wanted to add another BC to my crew but I had a whole laundry list of things I needed and/or wanted. It took me almost 2 years of fostering to find the right one and I couldn't be happier with my decision. She excels naturally at any sports I throw at her, has an amazing off switch, loves every person/kid, and is just perfect. :D

 

Of course I am super picky, which is most likely why it took so long. :rolleyes: A small BC or smaller herding breed mix may do well. My girl is 28lbs. Not sure what her height is as I haven't gotten an accurate measurement, but she's very petite.

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Personally if I were you i'd be looking for a smaller BC or small Aussie. I prefer to have an equal male/female ratio but it's much easier to do male/male if you get the newcomer as a pup, not an adult.

 

Just the other day i met a very very small BC female at the park, her drive/energy/work willingness was so much greater than Seamus I was floored! JRs are nice dogs but I wouldn't recommend one to a home with small children. But that depends on just how small the children are and how they interact with dogs.

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We found that the best friend for a BC, is another BC and when we decided it was time for a second dog, went to rescue for a good match for Ladybug....and yes, we chose a male... Scotty has since crossed the Rainbow Bridge and so we took on Robin and Brodie as pups (not something I'd not recommend for a small household! :rolleyes: ) but if you've got a shy dog, perhaps working with a rescue organization - or someone who knows the breed quite well and could help you find a "good fit", would be helpful.

 

Liz

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I'll chime in on an adult dog as well, one that obviously adores and rowdy attention of children but does not become over stimulated by it.

 

I would not be looking in the direction of JRT or Corgi unless it met the above criteria myself. Ime they are highly reactive breeds that are programmed to use their mouths when over stimulated - the last think you need when keeping other people's children.

 

Don't rule out a larger dog. I know space is an issue, but a calm, relaxed larger dog will take up far less actual space than a hyper, reactive, frenetic small one. And by far, smaller dogs are usually much more active than the larger breeds.

 

Some breeds are going to be more physically tolerant than others - an good start with the child issue.. Again, you need to look at individuals but dogs will bull terrier, retriever, or hound ancestry is most likely going to be less reactive to touch and sound than a terrier or herding dog. The downside with super physically tolerant breeds is that they can be mouthy young. Another vote for an adult dog...

 

Lots of BCx in rescue.....adults, and often ideal for families.

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I have a JRT and would vehemently advise you to NOT get one! They are totally spastic. My vet says that it's the JRT's that keep her in business. Mine has been sewn up too many times to count now! They NEVER back down from a fight, and are bred to go after small critters. They are cute as can be, and have loads of personality, but they are way too high strung. Mine was given to me by my mother-in-law after she destroyed her house, shredded the curtains and 2 sofa's then chewed the tires off my brother-in-law's wheel chair. That was the last straw and she was dumped on my doorstep, with the comment, "you like dogs, here, she's your's". I've had "Crazy Kate" for 9 years now, she is 13 and still is only slowing down slightly. Now a Golden Retriever is a perfect companion for a BC IMO. They are calm, smart, gentle and the energy of a BC works nicely them. I have a JRT, a BC and a Golden. My long term goal is to be a 2 dog family with just a BC and Golden.

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A JRT pup is going to need to be kept separate from whatever kids you are watching until it is 18-24 m/o, they are persistent, nippy energetic, little rascals.

 

I'll add in my vote to an adult rescue. A 2-3 y/o small BC mix might be perfect for you. My middle BC is very driven and playful, but completely calm around kids. And he's only about 18 inches tall and weighs 30#.

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I would not have a JRT around kids that weren't my own (haha...like I'll ever have kids). But seriously, they're too nippy for kids.

 

A puppy is no guarantee of how a dog will grow up. If you want to know how a dog will turn out, get an adult dog.

 

Honestly, size of the dog has less to do with house size than activity level of the dog. Mick would NEVER be an apartment dog. Sinead could easily live in a studio apartment. She's very active outside, but inside she just lays around. Sometimes she'll wrestle with Mick, but they don't really play with each other. Mick's not much for playing with other dogs. He won't play tug with her anymore, since she always wins, and he's a sore loser. And despite the fact that her breed has a bad rap, she is 100% stable with kids/people. A kid could do anything to her, and she's actually very gentle playing with kids, even though she can be rough playing with adults.

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I would add to the nixes on Jack Russells. If you want a terrier, and a dog that size, consider a Border Terrier. They are lively and bright, but not "wrapped so tight" as a Jack Russell.

 

My experience of Corgis is not good. The ones I've known were barky and snarky. Especially with other dogs. YMMV.

 

As for getting another Border Collie, I would think that if you went to a reputable Border Collie Rescue that they would have "vetted" the dog's temperament pretty thoroughly and be able to tell you what the dog could/ could not handle. Maybe, since space is a consideration, an older one that would be less active and not underfoot all day.

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My experience of Corgis is not good. The ones I've known were barky and snarky. Especially with other dogs. YMMV.

 

I've known one Corgi and it was a tough dog. Probably not good with kids. It used to hang on my friend's punching bag and dangle forever.

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I will second the "don't choose by a breed" advice given earlier, and also the suggestion of an adult dog. You have some specific needs, I would talk to some excellent rescues and tell them you are open to meeting the right dog . The right dog may turn out to be a JRT, it may turn out to be a nice mellow BC, it might turn out to be an oversized Pap or even a mix. You need a laid-back, bombproof with kids dog who gets along well with your other dog. Use that as your criteria vs. size, fur color, etc.

 

Please be very careful when adopting a dog from rescue though:

 

[disclaimer! this is not, I repeat NOT a slam on rescues!!!!]

Some people who run rescues can be lead by their heart rather than their head when taking in, evaluating and placing a dog. I have met several people in the greater Portland area who had real issues with dogs they adopted (kid aggression, dog aggression, serious resource guarding) that their rescue either did not see or chose to overlook and these dogs were placed with families with young children or in homes with novice pet owners with unpleasant results. In several cases, the rescue became angry and either refused to take the dog back or blamed the adopters.

 

Choose a rescue with a good reputation, get to know all you can about the dog and consider having an impartial 3rd party (a knowledgeable dog friend, an excellent trainer or behaviorist with experience in problem dogs) evaluate the dog during a visit, and make sure they understand all your needs. Spend a lot of time talking to the humans involved and you will get a better feel for their understanding of dogs and how they behave.

 

There are a lot of very nice, very cool dogs out there who ended up in rescue because of unfortunate circumstances who would be perfect for you.

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rushdoggie gave some excellent advice. As did others. I'm definitely on the "No JRT" band wagon. While they are smart, cute, perfect size dogs, they are not for the feint of heart. My mother had one and one of her friends had two when I was in high school. If you're serious about training and investing A LOT of time into one, by all means, get one, but they take a lot of dedication. They are stubborn, bred to work independently from their handler. While ours was not as "high strung" as some I've seen, she had little respect for authority and took some serious training to even get a decent recall.

 

Great mousers though.

 

I would also look for an adult rescue proven to be good with kids!

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I'll echo the "NO JRT" sentiments. :rolleyes: As a rule, they are very high energy and stubborn to boot, AND prone to nipping. Sure, there are exceptions, but remember, they were bred to hunt varmints in packs, so obedience, calmness and bid-ability aren't their usual strong points. I've yet to meet a JRT that I'd consider truly safe with kids, simply because the natural energy level of children keys the dogs up, too.

 

I'll also echo that choosing a specific breed might not be the best course. For a house full of kids, I'd recommend you look at individual dogs with an eye towards temperament rather than breed, and look at the parents' temperaments, too. If you *can* find a calm, gentle adult dog from rescue or someone needing a good home, that might be easier than trying to raise a puppy in a house full of kids. Yes, you want be sure where the dog comes from, but children around puppies .... a cute picture, but not the best way to raise a respectful, well-mannered pup. Children can easily trigger play nips in almost any breed.

 

That said, though, if you do want a puppy, I still recommend looking at various individuals, rather than any specific breed. Having a bunch of kids around your house opens liabilities the average puppy buyer doesn't have. Good luck! :D

Cheers ~

 

Gloria

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Don't rule out a larger dog. I know space is an issue, but a calm, relaxed larger dog will take up far less actual space than a hyper, reactive, frenetic small one.

This is so, so true! A calm adult dog who enjoys children would be my vote, and size wouldn't be much of a factor.

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DW recently took in a foster JRT.

Some I have not cared for too much and some have been so-so.

Of all the dogs we have and have had, I have never actually hated a dog.

Until Jack, the JRT!

I hate that dog with a passion. It barks over everything, attacks Bernie, Nisa and Tasha for no particular reason and is the biggest pain in the ass of a dog we have ever had. It gets along great with the other ankle biters (2 chihuahuas and a toy poodle) but does not like the larger ones and lets its feelings be well known.

 

I know not all JRTs are this way, but then again just from what has been said here and I have heard from others, I would take a dozen spastic over the top no off switch border collies before I will ever let another JRT set its paw in this house again.

 

YMMV

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Thankyou for all the advice - i didn't mean to start an anti JRT thread though! :rolleyes: lol

 

I went out yesterday and today, just to go out of my way to meet JRT - (the park of course) I came across 11. 2 of those i knew of already as they dog walk at the same times as me. The other nine were new to me. 7 were very friendly, with the same kind of temperments as Ollie. 1 was very(!!!) crazy - jumping up ect, but the owner just didnt seem to have control and i consider that to be a training problem. The last one was on a lead as was a rescue nerous of other dogs.

 

So they cant all be bad! :D

 

I'll keep you all updated on my research! :D

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