Jump to content
BC Boards

Recommended Posts

I am having a difficult time in cleaning Daisy's teeth. I can't find a tooth paste that she likes and on top of that she thinks the brush is a toy. :rolleyes:

 

I would like to try giving Daisy bones to chew on to see if this works better. My dad got her some meaty beef bones (from the knee to the ankle) but I am a little concerned these are too hard for her teeth. They also don't seem to get the back half of her teeth very well. What bones would be best?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I particularly like bones like beef ribs and other similar-sized bones that are not too hard but are small enough that the dogs can really work them with their back teeth. That said, many of the bones my dogs get are beef leg bones because that's what we have available. My more enthusiastic chewers tend to have cleaner teeth but, in general, they all tend to have very clean teeth.

 

I think part of the issue is finding the kind of bone that your dog will chew vigorously with her back teeth, and that may take a little experimenting. I think some folks have good luck with chicken parts (raw, of course) like backs and hind quarters, or turkey necks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No advice on the bones but we do have some tooth cleaning wipes here for dogs. I usually take turns with my two... between those and a brush with paste. With the wipes you use your finger to clean so it perhaps won't seem so much of a toy/ game thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

All of my teeth cleaning problems were solved when I started feeding raw, as in Raw Meaty Bones diet. My 7 1/2 year old had dark stains on her teeth and now they are white, almost as bright as my puppies.

 

Your right to be afraid of the leg bones. No weight bearing bones because they are too hard. No cooked bones either because they can splinter.

 

Good Luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same question when my Finn was just over a year, his teeth had gotten very dirty.After working as a vet tech I do not like anaesthesia unless absolutely neccessary, so I asked on here & the wise folks reccommended raw meaty bones.They were right ! We buy the Primal " Recreation " bones, usually the 4 inch beef,and knawing on them does remove the tartar ( plus he loves it :rolleyes:

 

http://www.primalpetfoods.com/product/list/c/11

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I taught Riley to accept the administrations of a tooth scaler. If you have good eyesight it is easy to tell the tartar from the tooth surface and it scrapes away quite easily. I do Riley's teeth twice a year or so and he lays quietly with his head on my leg while I work. He really hates tooth brushing, but will nearly fall asleep while I fuss with the scaler. With some bribery I was even able to get my mom's Lab/Dane cross to let me get the worst of it off of his teeth in one session. Dogs rarely get cavities, but the heavy buildup of tartar near the gumline can cause pain and gingivitis. With just a little downward pressure on the tooth at the gumline towards the tip of the tooth those yellow, brown edged irritating layers of tarter flake right off. The vet I worked for used a type of sonic water scraper under anesthesia which was faster, but a good old scaler will do the job just as well.

 

Oh, did a friend's GSD, too. Most dogs don't seem to mind this very much at all. The worst part for them is accepting the restraint to lie still flat out on their side so you can work properly. And yes, I've done this with the approval of a vet watching when the sonic machine broke down. It works.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard very good reviews of a product called Petzlife (sp?) for doggie teeth cleaning. I believe it comes in either a spray or gel, and folks who have used it were really pleased.

 

For my dogs, I give them turkey or chicken necks specifically for teeth cleaning. I put on a pair of gloves and hold the chicken/turkey neck, and make sure my dogs chew with their back teeth, switching sides and whatnot. I'm sure others just let the dogs at 'em, but mine are gulpers and I want to make sure they are chewing in order to clean the teeth. Just be careful you still have all your fingers at the end, if you try this! :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
I give turkey necks...the bigger the better to discourage my lab mix from swallowing them whole. Also beef knuckle bones and ribs.

 

I've been trying for months to find turkey necks. Grocery stores around here don't seem to carry them, farmers' markets ditto, have searched online, have checked with the local "upscale" pet stores that carry raw foods.... no go. The best I've found is that the Pet Depot near me has a source but apparently they are in the process of working out a new technique to sterilize turkey necks (to minimize risks to humans handling them?) without "cooking" them (endangering the dogs who consume them).

 

Those of you who do feed turkey necks - where on earth do you get them from?

Link to post
Share on other sites

wholesale meat supplier (supplies restaurants and zoos mostly) or from Oma's Pride.

 

Most meat counters can order them for you by the case. Speak to the manager. I don't even mention dog, it's not of their business and for some reason make them rather nervous about you until they get to know you better. Turkey necks are common in southern cooking and in gourmet cooking (for stock in particular) so a request is not that bizarre.

 

Look for grocers that carry all parts - pigs feets, necks, turkey wings etc. They are your best bet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I get turkey necks at my local grocery store BUT only on very random occasions. I look every single time I go by the poultry display, and maybe every 6 weeks or so, they'll have a big lot of turkey necks in 1-2 lb. packs. These are always marked "Purdue Turkey Necks." They must have some kind of deal with Purdue to take their necks on occasion?

 

(It might help that we have a fairly high population of new immigrants around here - someone told me once to look in ethnic markets, because turkey necks are used more commonly in other countries to make soups, stews, etc..)

 

Mary

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to get them by the case from a local food distributor for .69/lb I think (not a grocery store...a company that distributes to restaurants and stores). I would search on Yahoo! Groups and see if there is a local raw feeding group for your area...that's where I find out about how to get most stuff around here. You could also look up distributors and see if anyone will order a case for you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can get chicken necks any time from my regular grocery store. Turkey necks aren't available as often, but they're still in stock at times. I guess I'm lucky that they carry all kinds of fun stuff like that. I've seen pigs feet, but never bought 'em. Last week I bought a huge package of chicken hearts for the dogs, cheap! My poor husband was so traumatized. :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

I read somewhere about using backing soda to clean dogs teeth. I started using that to get the stains off the back upper molars. Now I use the dental wipes and peanut butter flavored DOG toothpaste. She had one cleaning when she was around 2 years old. I rec'd the postcard from the vet about another cleaning. I went in for a visit to get the one last itsy bitsy tick off her chest (foung 8-10 in 1 1/2 weeks this past May) and I couldn't get it out with the tick tool. I mentioned the postcard and he said she didn't need it and didn't want to put her under unncessarily. I told him I didn't like the brown stains on the upper back molars...he used the scraper and my dog just let him without a fight. He was so amazed...guess all the time I put into cleaning them paid off.

 

Thanks for all the tips about the raw meaty bones and sources. I will definitely look for some. Qustion though...shouldn't I make sure they were from animals raised without hormones, etc? How do you know if they don't have all that "stuff?" Is there something listed on the packaging?

 

Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
shouldn't I make sure they were from animals raised without hormones, etc? How do you know if they don't have all that "stuff?"

 

How do you know the meat *you* eat doesn't have all that stuff? If you are buying locally-raised meats, milk, cheeses, and eggs, and organic fruits and veggies, then you are probably as close as one can get from all that "stuff." Otherwise, it's in there,

A

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can get chicken necks any time from my regular grocery store. Turkey necks aren't available as often, but they're still in stock at times. I guess I'm lucky that they carry all kinds of fun stuff like that. I've seen pigs feet, but never bought 'em. Last week I bought a huge package of chicken hearts for the dogs, cheap! My poor husband was so traumatized. :rolleyes:

Why is it that you used to be able to get packages of hearts, livers, and gizzards and now they all come separate? The package of hearts I bought the other day was kind of creepy, though, lol!

 

I have a Compare foods in Durham where I can get all sorts of different things for the dogs. They cater to a Hispanic market and so carry things that you don't usually see in other stores (why I don't know, because it's stuff like beef neckbones, beef shins--look like little steaks, goat stew meat, and so on), which is great for variety!

 

J.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is it that you used to be able to get packages of hearts, livers, and gizzards and now they all come separate? The package of hearts I bought the other day was kind of creepy, though, lol!

 

And for some reason the hearts have gone up per pound too, I paid $1.29 the other day and they were .89 about 2 years ago. Chicken hearts make the best "pill pockets" (Thanks to Root Beer who pointed it out).

 

The necks are the best for us, but I do have a dog who still has some gunk in some parts of his mouth (he doesn't seem to chew all over it) so I am trying this:

 

Pro Den Plaque Off

I have a friend who has used it and swears the plaque started flaking off about 6 weeks after she started. The dose I give him is so tiny that the jar I have should last a year (it was $16), so the price is right. I also found you can buy the seaweed its made of by the pound cheaper (just go_ogle the scientific name of it) so if it works for my littel Geezer man I may start giving it to all of them. Heck, I may start using it myself!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lark turned her nose up at chicken necks last night, so I gave them to Pip and Phoebe. I can see what people mean about them not being entirely useful for teeth cleaning. Granted they weren't huge necks, but I don't think any chewing happened--I handed them out turned around and when I turned back, they were gone. I suspect not a single tooth came in contact with those necks!

 

j.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you know the meat *you* eat doesn't have all that stuff? If you are buying locally-raised meats, milk, cheeses, and eggs, and organic fruits and veggies, then you are probably as close as one can get from all that "stuff." Otherwise, it's in there,

A

I'm trying to learn more about raw diet, feeding bones, etc. Thus my question around is there a source for Organic raw meaty bones, chicken necks, etc. or not?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it varies. There are some folks who have posted here in the past who say they are part of co-ops that get really good prices on stuff that's local. In other places, that may not be the case. Buying organic is going to cost you more. I would suggest going to your local farmer's market and talking to local producers. Around here, folks already offer meat cuts to raw feeders, but even if they don't at the local farmer's market, many farmers will be happy to supply you with parts, especially parts that aren't in high demand from their regular customers (typical stuff people eat). If you talk to people directly, you can find out about their husbandry practices and probably find suppliers whose husbandry matches your needs. For example, you might find that you don't really need organic, but that naturally raised (minimal chemical input) would suit your needs, and be less costly.

 

So anyway, start at your farmer's market and go from there.

 

J.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it varies. There are some folks who have posted here in the past who say they are part of co-ops that get really good prices on stuff that's local. In other places, that may not be the case. Buying organic is going to cost you more. I would suggest going to your local farmer's market and talking to local producers. Around here, folks already offer meat cuts to raw feeders, but even if they don't at the local farmer's market, many farmers will be happy to supply you with parts, especially parts that aren't in high demand from their regular customers (typical stuff people eat). If you talk to people directly, you can find out about their husbandry practices and probably find suppliers whose husbandry matches your needs. For example, you might find that you don't really need organic, but that naturally raised (minimal chemical input) would suit your needs, and be less costly.

 

So anyway, start at your farmer's market and go from there.

 

J.

 

 

Thanks Julie, I appreciate the information. With you living in Oxford..there is a meat packaging company (think that is what it is called) in Durham closer to RTP I think it's called Inscoe's...have you ever gotten anything from them? That is IF they are even a company that has these kinds of parts available.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just moved to Oxford in January, so I'm not really familiar with anything in Raleigh. I'll have to look in to it though. I don't feed organic because I can't really afford it, though my dogs do get a lot of lamb and chicken that I've raised myself and venison hunted by others, so I know how a good part of their diet was raised!

 

J.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No poultry has hormones in it, by law. Lamb rarely is raised with either hormones or tons of antibiotics.

 

"Organic" meat is little bit of public manipulation. If you really want sustainable meat, look for locally raised, right off the farm. You want sustainable farming practices, forage based feeding, and humane management of the animals.

 

Organic ONLY refers to inputs. It's highly relevant with regard to fruit, grain, veggies (shudder, apples). But the benefits in animal products versus simply humanely, sustainably raised livestock isn't as clear, I don't think.

 

I get a ton of really crazy, weirdo stuff at Compare Foods, a market that is ethnically focused. I've gotten whole pig heads there, for about fifty cents a pound. Those are awesome for puppies or old dogs IF they are used to raw feeding.

 

I get these packets of beef ribs that are about twelve inches long, then go down to maybe four inches. The larger ribs go to Lu the retired LGD, Sam the service dog, whose teeth need to stay spotless, and Ted and Gus who have trouble with plaque buildup for some reason.

 

The other really awesome tooth cleaner is beef shank cross cuts. There are meaty ones, but the useful ones are the boney frisbees. The bone part is actually munchable with some work. It's not brittle, it has a honeycomb structure which gives under pressure unless your dog's teeth are very soft (in which case raw bones of all kinds are out(!

 

To munch these, the dog hhas to get this flat disc t way back in his mouth and shave away. Awesome.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...