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I mentioned to a friend the other day how nice it would be to have a sleeping porch--it still gets relatively pleasant outside at night and sleeping on a screened porch would be lovely!

 

J.

 

I'd prefer that as well -- I spend a lot of time out on the swing... in more amenable temperatures as we are pretty bugless around here ....but this new lung reconfiguration leaves me more appreciative of a climate controlled environment (i.e no heavy humidity, dust, smoke,) Yesterday was just oppressive here again -- heat index 104......we're just not used to this kind of heat up here in the mountains! Today was a little better but some idiot thought she had to go shopping in the city!

 

Liz

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Hmmm, breeding doesn't matter much to a dead dog. Thanks for helping that dog. I have never been able to acclimatize to high heat/humidity, and had a bit of an emergency last year. I don't risk it for me, and that means by default, my dogs don't either. That said, low 90s is almost tolerable to do some work out side. Upper 90s+ high humidity, no.

 

Today as I checked my sheep, they looked about as tired as I am of this weather. Looks like we will have low 90s next week, so if we don't get some rain, it's going to be a very bad scene.

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You're right, Mr. McCaig, advising a vet when a dog is already on wobbly legs was a mistake, unless, as you note, the vet is right next door. In my haste to imprint the seriousness of such an occasion, I mis-spoke. :rolleyes:

 

I'm glad to see this discussion now that summer is upon us. Y'all take care!

Cheers ~

 

Gloria

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If I have to do ranch work in the brutal heat I will do it as early as it is light. When we trail sheep the work is sometimes like a 1 to 2 hour all out sprint for the dog as they are pushing in back then up the side of hundreds of sheep. When I have had to work all day in the heat and I know for a fact that http://www.k9energyedge.com/inform.html has saved my dogs life several times. When working on the range often the only water you have is what you pack on your horse or ATV. I have had dogs get the “staggers” and I can say it is terrifying to feel that helpless when a dog is in that kind of distress. I have had friends dogs die because of this. I have used and seen the energy edge used on dogs that were staggering after exercise, and the recovery after use is amazing.

 

 

The owners of this product are friends of mine, but I have no “stake” in the company. Dr Untisz started making the product when her Kelpie got the staggers. She developed her own product and people started to ask for it when she went to dog trials. She gave it out for years and then decided to market it when the demand so big she could not keep up. The following is from the owner of this site Angie Untisz DMV

 

Carbohydrates provide energy during the initial phases of work (it takes a few minutes for fat metabolism to be "activated") and when there is a sudden need for more energy, such as sprinting, jumping, running up hill etc. Carbs are stored as glycogen in the muscles but these stores are easily depleted and not quickly replenished. Studies have shown that providing a "good carb" source after exercise (within 20 minutes of ending exercise) takes advantage of open pathways on the muscle cell and restore glycogen more effectively than normal feeding. This targeted approach allows for up to 80% restoration of glycogen resources. Diet alone provides only up to 40% restoration.

A "good carb" can be given in small volume, is readily absorbed and doesn't cause the release of insulin. Maltodextrin (also called Dextrin) fits this definition. It can be mixed with a small volume of water and given to "hot" dogs soon after exercise. It's rapidly absorbed without stimulating insulin release (so no rebound hypoglycemia). Mixing a small amount of protein with the maltodextrin is synergystic.

 

When I train my dogs I often end up working them in the middle of the day. I keep it short 6-10 minutes and let them cool in the water tank. At trials i will use the product for my older dog to keep him from being so sore at 3 day trials. Lana

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I agree with Lana. Energy Edge is an amazing product! I do what Lana says and I know Lana and I both feed a high quality food with NO grain and add fat to their food. This helps build up their endurance and heat tolerance. That said, if the temp is too high and my dog is too hot, I will retire during a run. It's only a dog trial!!! I think the USBCHA guidelines for having a tub of water on the course during hot weather is a must.

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A few people have mentioned or questioned using ice to cool down a hot dog. This is a no-no. Ice constricts the blood vessels (this is why you ice something swollen - to reduce bloodflow to the area). Constricting the blood vessels at the surface through use of ice or really cold water will prevent the dog's core from cooling.

 

If you're going to be working dogs in the heat, you better have access to or supplies to cool off an overheating dog quickly. Time is of the essence.

 

Best advice I can give is learn your dog and stop him/her from getting too hot.

 

Stay cool!

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Best advice I can give is learn your dog and stop him/her from getting too hot.

 

Stay cool!

 

Yeah, Mick is a dog that will just keep going no matter how hot or tired he is, if left to his own devices. Fortunately, I have him trained to take water breaks and jump into kiddie pools/water tanks on command. Personally, I think that's a great thing for any dog to learn. Sinead will quit if she gets overheated, but Mick won't.

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Geri, Lana, bless you!

 

I've never heard of Energy Edge or that Balanced Fat stuff, but I'll definitely look into it.

 

One thing that worries me about Nick, particularly now summer is here, is that when he works, he powers up like he's launching to the moon. Every movement he makes, even when going slow, is just so powerful that he's burning enormous reserves of energy. He's a prime candidate for overheating, and I've been concerned about how to help him out, as an athlete. The scary part is that some of the stuff out there is horrendously expensive.

 

However, these supplements look cost-effective as well as like good stuff, so I'll give them a closer look when I'm not falling asleep at my computer. :rolleyes:

 

Thank you, ladies!

Cheers ~

 

Gloria

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I've always heard that rubbing alcohol is the best option when trying to cool a dog down. We had a dog come into the shelter on the brink of heat stroke (very overweight, senior Rottie brought in in the uncovered back of a pickup on a day in the low 90s) and the vet suggested rubbing alcohol on her belly and foot pads to cool her instead of water. The receiving room smelled like rubbing alcohol for the next few hours, but the dog recovered fairly quickly and needed no further treatment.

 

My dogs have agility classes back to back and outdoors so at least once a week they have to be outside for 2 hours as things are heating up (9 to 11am), and each spend an hour training. I make sure we have a shaded crating area, lots of water, and opportunities to rest and take a dip in the kiddie pool and we've never had a problem.

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With all this discussion of jumping in the water to cool off, it would be good to remind folks that certain dogs do not behave responsibly around water and can actually die, quite rapidly, from something called "water intoxication". Border collies, because of their love of splashing and biting at water, are particularly susceptible. If you have one of these dogs, you should know the signs and symptoms and be prepared to react.

 

Here is a recent thread: Water Intoxication

 

Here is another example from a dog I know, just this week: Part I Part II

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Hmmm, breeding doesn't matter much to a dead dog. Thanks for helping that dog. I have never been able to acclimatize to high heat/humidity, and had a bit of an emergency last year. I don't risk it for me, and that means by default, my dogs don't either. That said, low 90s is almost tolerable to do some work out side. Upper 90s+ high humidity, no.

 

Today as I checked my sheep, they looked about as tired as I am of this weather. Looks like we will have low 90s next week, so if we don't get some rain, it's going to be a very bad scene.

 

 

Still hot up here again this week....but at least we've had some rain...and the heat indexes have cooled down....still in the 90s with humidity in this neck of the woods but we've had some rain so it's still nice and green ...the summer hasn't been all that bad (but then, I've not been outdoors on a roof like poor DH).

 

What's your dog's swimming style? Dock diver? Otter? Plays in the shallows? I've got one of each...

 

Ladybug glides through the frog pond, seeking her prey, while Brodie plays in the shallows but once in awhile, he'll do a lap. Robin continues to cannonball in and swamp everyone...Ladybug found it necessary to nip his ear the other day to remind him of his manners. I let them try the swimming pool...what the heck, we've got to replace the liner anyway. Ladybug said no thanks. Been there, done that and there's a bath at the end of it. Swim out to the line boys and come right back....felt like I was teaching my four year old again.... Robin does swim nicely in the pool -- just glides off the steps like my son used to.....Brodie plays on the steps....he likes the shallows. Then a rinse with the hose and a towel dry --

 

I actually (and I'm embarrassed to admit this) for the first time saw Robin rolling on the grass to dry himself off like a genuine self respecting Border Collie yesterday. My Mudbug got so many baths and spray-offs with the hose last year as a pup that he's used to being towel dried and its become part of the swimming routine as well as on rainy days.

 

I keep a stack of old bath towels on the porch and they all get dried off, Robin is first in line. I gave my nephew the privilege of drying off Robin yesterday (he wants a dog- his mother left him with me to show him how much work they are) while I worked on Brodie and Ladybug. Must be he didn't complete the job to Robin's satisfaction, nor did he comb him out like I do, so Robin actually went out and rolled on the grass to dry himself off....the first time I've ever seen that spoiled rotten dog do that. I know, I'm silly but there's a method to my madness....the more hair I remove outside, the less I have to vacuum up inside. :rolleyes:

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What's your dog's swimming style? Dock diver? Otter? Plays in the shallows? I've got one of each...

 

Duncan likes to pretend to be a hovercraft:

 

4803400503_fb3a46d665_z.jpg

 

He is, however, willing to swim - provided that some object to fetch is involved:

 

4803408927_741aeb43b3_z.jpg

 

But if he can't get anyone to throw anything for him, he just stands there like a pathetic drowned rat:

 

4803414753_60ebea9d58_z.jpg

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I like the Balanced Fat, plus a product for post hard exercise called K9 SuperFuel.

 

I thought I liked the K9 Superfuel, too, until I realized their shipping on the 1lb jar costs almost as much as the darned product. :rolleyes: I can't rationalize buying the 40 or 55 dollar container now, so ... guess I'll wait on that. I think I'll give the Energy Edge a whirl, though.

 

~ Gloria

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Four things I do here in the Phoenix, AZ area:

 

1) Never go out until 15-20 minutes prior to sunset. The sun is then low enough to basically be blocked out by ground clutter.

2) Cerb goes out every day...there's a lot to be said for being acclimated.

3) Cold drinking water. Not only cools down the "panting area" but puts cold water in the highly vascularized stomach, cooling the core.

4) Spray bottle: Lets me squirt him down several times during eaach session

 

I also keep sessions to ~ 1/2 hour, let him dictate the intensity and I've actually trained for a "get a drink" command.

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